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figure of speech

John Lyly (c. 1554—1606) writer and playwright

antithesis

George Pettie (c. 1548—1589) writer of romances

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euphuism


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An artificial, highly elaborate way of writing or speaking. Recorded from the late 16th century, the word comes from late 16th century: from Euphues, the name of a character in John Lyly's prose romance of the same name (1578–80), from Greek euphuēs ‘well endowed by nature’. It originally referred to a conversational and literary style popular in the late 16th and early 17th centuries in imitation of Lyly's work.

Subjects: Literature


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