Show Summary Details

Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD REFERENCE (www.oxfordreference.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2013. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single entry from a reference work in OR for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 15 November 2019

Deposition from the Cross, the 

Source:
The Oxford Dictionary of Christian Art and Architecture
Author(s):
Tom Devonshire JonesTom Devonshire Jones, Linda MurrayLinda Murray, Peter MurrayPeter Murray

The account in the Gospels of the taking down of the body of Jesus from the Cross (also called Descent from the Cross) is in all four Gospels. Mark (15: 42–7) says: ‘When evening had come, and since it was the day of Preparation, that is, the day before the sabbath, Joseph of Arimathaea, a respected member of the council, who was also himself waiting expectantly for the kingdom of God, went boldly to Pilate, and asked for the body of Jesus. Then Pilate wondered if he were already dead; and summoning the centurion, he asked him whether he had been dead for some time. When he learned from the centurion that he was dead, he granted the body to Joseph. Then Joseph bought a fine linen cloth, and taking down the body, wrapped it in the linen cloth, and laid it in a tomb that had been hewn out of the rock. He then rolled a stone against the door of the tomb. Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Joses saw where the body was laid.’ Matthew (27: 57–66) and Luke (23: 50–5) have similar accounts, but John (19: 39–42) adds: ‘Nicodemus … also came bringing a mixture of myrrh and aloes, weighing about a hundred pounds. They took the body of Jesus and wrapped it with the spices in linen cloths, according to the burial custom of the Jews. Now there was a garden in the place where he was crucified, and in the garden there was a new tomb in which no one had ever been laid. And so, because it was the Jewish day of Preparation, and the tomb was nearby, they laid Jesus there.’ Because the next day was a great feast the body had to be buried before sunset to avoid defilement, but the stages between the death of Christ on the Cross and His actual burial came to be extended in works like the ... ...

Access to the complete content on Oxford Reference requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can''t find the answer there, please contact us.