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Subscriber: null; date: 23 October 2019

stoa

Source:
A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture
Author(s):

James Stevens Curl,

Susan Wilson

stoa 

1. Type of Ancient-Greek portico of limited depth but great length, with a long wall at the back and a colonnade on the front, usually facing a public space, used for promenades, meetings, etc. Some were of two storeys, e.g. Stoa of Attalus, Athens (C2 bc—restored), with Doric columns on the lower storey and Ionic above.

2. Temple portico with the front columns so much in advance that an extra column is needed between the colonnade in front and the structure behind, i.e. a deep prostyle portico.

3. Byzantine hall with its roof supported on one or more parallel rows of columns.

Bibliography

Coulton (1976); Ck (1996); D (1950); D.S.R (1945); S (1901–2); Wy (1962)