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date: 21 May 2019

gonzo journalism

Source:
A Dictionary of Journalism
Author(s):

Tony Harcup

gonzo journalism 

A style of reporting incorporating a variety of literary conventions to place the journalist at the centre of the narrative. Most closely associated with the US writer Hunter S. Thompson (1937–2005), gonzo journalism involves a mixture of personal observation, verbatim transcripts of conversations, overheard dialogue, and extracts from documents or original notes, mostly delivered at great length and frequently focusing as much on the quest for information as on the information itself. Although often criticized for self-indulgence, elements of gonzo can be detected in much mainstream journalism today. See also immersion reporting; literary journalism; long-form journalism; new journalism.