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date: 14 June 2021

Alexander Pope 1688–1744
English poet 

  1. Poetic Justice, with her lifted scale.
     
    The Dunciad (1742) bk. 1, l. 52
  2. Gentle Dullness ever loves a joke.
     
    The Dunciad (1742) bk. 2, l. 34
  3. A brain of feathers, and a heart of lead.
     
    The Dunciad (1742) bk. 2, l. 44
  4. All crowd, who foremost shall be damned to Fame.
     
    The Dunciad (1742) bk. 3, l. 158
  5. A wit with dunces, and a dunce with wits.
     
    The Dunciad (1742) bk. 4, l. 90
  6. The Right Divine of Kings to govern wrong.
     
    The Dunciad (1742) bk. 4, l. 187
  7. Lo! thy dread empire, Chaos! is restored;
    Light dies before thy uncreating word:
    Thy hand, great Anarch! lets the curtain fall;
    And universal darkness buries all.
     
    The Dunciad (1742) bk. 4, l. 653
  8. Vital spark of heav'nly flame!
    Quit, oh quit this mortal frame:
    Trembling, hoping, ling'ring, flying,
    Oh the pain, the bliss of dying!
     
    ‘The Dying Christian to his Soul’ (1730); see Hadrian
  9. How happy is the blameless Vestal's lot!
    The world forgetting, by the world forgot.
     
    ‘Eloisa to Abelard’ (1717) l. 207
  10. Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind!
     
    ‘Eloisa to Abelard’ (1717) l. 209
  11. I am his Highness' dog at Kew;
    Pray, tell me sir, whose dog are you?
     
    ‘Epigram Engraved on the Collar of a Dog which I gave to his Royal Highness’ (1738)
  12. Sir, I admit your gen'ral rule
    That every poet is a fool:
    But you yourself may serve to show it,
    That every fool is not a poet.
     
    ‘Epigram from the French’ (1732)
  13. You beat your pate, and fancy wit will come:
    Knock as you please, there's nobody at home.
     
    ‘Epigram: You beat your pate’ (1732)
  14. As yet a child, nor yet a fool to fame,
    I lisped in numbers, for the numbers came.
     
    ‘An Epistle to Dr Arbuthnot’ (1735) l. 127
  15. The Muse but served to ease some friend, not wife,
    To help me through this long disease, my life.
     
    ‘An Epistle to Dr Arbuthnot’ (1735) l. 131
  16. Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer,
    And without sneering, teach the rest to sneer.
     
    ‘An Epistle to Dr Arbuthnot’ (1735) l. 201; see Wycherley
  17. ‘Satire or sense, alas! can Sporus feel?
    Who breaks a butterfly upon a wheel?’
     
    of Lord Hervey
    ‘An Epistle to Dr Arbuthnot’ (1735) l. 307; see Anonymous
  18. Unlearn'd, he knew no schoolman's subtle art,
    No language, but the language of the heart.
     
    of his own father
    ‘An Epistle to Dr Arbuthnot’ (1735) l. 398
  19. Who shall decide, when doctors disagree?
     
    Epistles to Several Persons ‘To Lord Bathurst’ (1733) l. 1
  20. The ruling passion, be it what it will,
    The ruling passion conquers reason still.
     
    Epistles to Several Persons ‘To Lord Bathurst’ (1733) l. 155; see Pope
  21. Consult the genius of the place in all.
     
    Epistles to Several Persons ‘To Lord Burlington’ (1731) l. 57; see Virgil
  22. 'Tis education forms the common mind,
    Just as the twig is bent, the tree's inclined.
     
    Epistles to Several Persons ‘To Lord Cobham’ (1734) l. 101
  23. Search then the Ruling Passion: There, alone,
    The wild are constant, and the cunning known;
    The fool consistent, and the false sincere.
     
    Epistles to Several Persons ‘To Lord Cobham’ (1734) l. 174; see Pope
  24. Nature, and Nature's laws lay hid in night.
    God said, Let Newton be! and all was light.
     
    ‘Epitaph: Intended for Sir Isaac Newton’ (1730); see Squire
  25. Unerring Nature, still divinely bright,
    One clear, unchanged, and universal light,
    Life, force and beauty must to all impart,
    At once the source and end and test of art.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 70
  26. Great wits sometimes may gloriously offend,
    And rise to faults true critics dare not mend.
    From vulgar bounds with brave disorder part
    And snatch a grace beyond the reach of art.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 152
  27. A little learning is a dangerous thing;
    Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 215
  28. Hills peep o'er hills, and Alps on Alps arise!
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 232
  29. Whoever thinks a faultless piece to see,
    Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er shall be.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 253
  30. True wit is Nature to advantage dressed,
    What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 297
  31. Words are like leaves; and where they most abound,
    Much fruit of sense beneath is rarely found.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 309
  32. Expression is the dress of thought.
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 318; see Johnson, Wesley
  33. A needless Alexandrine ends the song,
    That, like a wounded snake, drags its slow length along.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 356
  34. True ease in writing comes from art, not chance.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 362
  35. The sound must seem an echo to the sense.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 365
  36. But when loud surges lash the sounding shore,
    The hoarse, rough verse should like the torrent roar.
    When Ajax strives, some rock's vast weight to throw,
    The line too labours, and the words move slow.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 368
  37. Some praise at morning what they blame at night;
    But always think the last opinion right.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 430
  38. To err is human; to forgive, divine.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 525; see Anonymous
  39. All seems infected that th'infected spy,
    As all looks yellow to the jaundiced eye.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 558
  40. Men must be taught as if you taught them not,
    And things unknown proposed as things forgot.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 574
  41. The bookful blockhead, ignorantly read,
    With loads of learned lumber in his head.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 612
  42. For fools rush in where angels fear to tread.
     
    An Essay on Criticism (1711) l. 625
  43. Eye Nature's walks, shoot Folly as it flies,
    And catch the Manners living as they rise.
    Laugh where we must, be candid where we can;
    But vindicate the ways of God to man.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 1 (1733) l. 13; see Milton
  44. Hope springs eternal in the human breast:
    Man never Is, but always To be blest.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 1 (1733) l. 95
  45. Lo! the poor Indian, whose untutored mind
    Sees God in clouds, or hears him in the wind.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 1 (1733) l. 99
  46. Why has not man a microscopic eye?
    For this plain reason, man is not a fly.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 1 (1733) l. 193
  47. Die of a rose in aromatic pain?
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 1 (1733) l. 200; see Winchilsea
  48. The spider's touch, how exquisitely fine!
    Feels at each thread, and lives along the line.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 1 (1733) l. 217
  49. All are but parts of one stupendous whole,
    Whose body, Nature is, and God the soul.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 1 (1733) l. 267
  50. All nature is but art, unknown to thee;
    All chance, direction, which thou canst not see;
    All discord, harmony, not understood;
    All partial evil, universal good.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 1 (1733) l. 289
  51. And, spite of Pride, in erring Reason's spite,
    One truth is clear, ‘Whatever is, is right.’
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 1 (1733) l. 293
  52. Know then thyself, presume not God to scan;
    The proper study of mankind is man.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 2 (1733) l. 1; see Charron
  53. Created half to rise, and half to fall;
    Great lord of all things, yet a prey to all;
    Sole judge of truth, in endless error hurled;
    The glory, jest, and riddle of the world!
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 2 (1733) l. 15
  54. Vice is a monster of so frightful mien,
    As, to be hated, needs but to be seen;
    Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face,
    We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 2 (1733) l. 217
  55. The learn'd is happy nature to explore,
    The fool is happy that he knows no more.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 2 (1733) l. 263
  56. Behold the child, by Nature's kindly law
    Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a straw.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 2 (1733) l. 275
  57. For forms of government let fools contest;
    Whate'er is best administered is best.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 3 (1733) l. 303
  58. Thus God and nature linked the gen'ral frame,
    And bade self-love and social be the same.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 3 (1733) l. 317; An Essay on Man Epistle 4 (1734) l. 396 is similar
  59. What can ennoble sots, or slaves, or cowards?
    Alas! Not all the blood of all the Howards.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 4 (1734) l. 205
  60. An honest man's the noblest work of God.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 4 (1734) l. 248; see Ingersoll
  61. Thou wert my guide, philosopher, and friend.
     
    An Essay on Man Epistle 4 (1734) l. 380
  62. Achilles' wrath, to Greece the direful spring
    Of woes unnumbered, heavenly goddess, sing!
     
    translation of The Iliad (1715) bk. 1, l. 1; see Homer
  63. Get place and wealth, if possible, with grace;
    If not, by any means get wealth and place.
     
    Imitations of Horace bk. 1, Epistle 1 (1738) l. 103; see Horace
  64. Not to admire, is all the art I know,
    To make men happy, and to keep them so.
     
    Imitations of Horace bk. 1, Epistle 6 (1738) l. 1; see Horace
  65. There still remains, to mortify a wit,
    The many-headed monster of the pit.
     
    Imitations of Horace bk. 2, Epistle 1 (1737) l. 304
  66. Learn to live well, or fairly make your will;
    You've played, and loved, and ate, and drunk your fill:
    Walk sober off; before a sprightlier age
    Comes tittering on, and shoves you from the stage.
     
    Imitations of Horace (1737) bk. 2, epistle 2
  67. The feast of reason and the flow of soul.
     
    Imitations of Horace bk. 2, Satire 1 (1734) l. 128
  68. For I, who hold sage Homer's rule the best,
    Welcome the coming, speed the going guest.
     
    Imitations of Horace bk. 2, Satire 2 (1734) l. 159; Pope's translation of The Odyssey (1725–6) bk. 15, l. 84, has ‘Speed the parting guest’
  69. Let humble Allen, with an awkward shame,
    Do good by stealth, and blush to find it fame.
     
    Imitations of Horace Epilogue to the Satires (1738) Dialogue 1, l. 135
  70. Happy the man, whose wish and care
    A few paternal acres bound,
    Content to breathe his native air,
    In his own ground.
     
    ‘Ode on Solitude’ (written c.1700, aged about twelve)
  71. Thus let me live, unseen, unknown;
    Thus unlamented let me die;
    Steal from the world, and not a stone
    Tell where I lie.
     
    ‘Ode on Solitude’ (written c.1700, aged about twelve)
  72. Hunger is insolent, and will be fed.
    translation of The Odyssey (1725) bk. 7, l. 300
  73. What dire offence from am'rous causes springs,
    What mighty contests rise from trivial things.
     
    The Rape of the Lock (1714) canto 1, l. 1
  74. Beauty draws us with a single hair.
     
    The Rape of the Lock (1714) canto 2, l. 28
  75. Here thou, great Anna! whom three realms obey,
    Dost sometimes counsel take—and sometimes tea.
     
    The Rape of the Lock (1714) canto 3, l. 7
  76. At ev'ry word a reputation dies.
     
    The Rape of the Lock (1714) canto 3, l. 16
  77. The hungry judges soon the sentence sign,
    And wretches hang that jury-men may dine.
     
    The Rape of the Lock (1714) canto 3, l. 21
  78. Coffee, (which makes the politician wise,
    And see thro' all things with his half-shut eyes).
     
    The Rape of the Lock (1714) canto 3, l. 117
  79. Teach me to feel another's woe;
    To hide the fault I see;
    That mercy I to others show,
    That mercy show to me.
     
    ‘The Universal Prayer’ (1738)
  80. ‘Blessed is the man who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed’ was the ninth beatitude.
    letter to Fortescue, 23 September 1725
  81. A man should never be ashamed to own he has been in the wrong, which is but saying, in other words, that he is wiser to-day than he was yesterday.
    Miscellanies (1727) vol. 2 ‘Thoughts on Various Subjects’
  82. It is with narrow-souled people as with narrow-necked bottles: the less they have in them, the more noise they make in pouring it out.
    Miscellanies (1727) vol. 2 ‘Thoughts on Various Subjects’
  83. When men grow virtuous in their old age, they only make a sacrifice to God of the devil's leavings.
    Miscellanies (1727) vol. 2 ‘Thoughts on Various Subjects’
  84. All gardening is landscape-painting.
    Joseph Spence Anecdotes (ed. J. Osborn, 1966) no. 606
  85. Here am I, dying of a hundred good symptoms.
    to George, Lord Lyttelton, 15 May 1744