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date: 18 October 2019

Kissing 

  1. A kiss is a lovely trick designed by nature to stop speech when words become superfluous.
    Ingrid Bergman 1915–82 Swedish actress: attributed
  2. when asked what it was like to kiss Marilyn Monroe:
    It's like kissing Hitler.
    Tony Curtis 1925–2010 American actor: A. Hunter Tony Curtis (1985)
  3. A fine romance with no kisses.
    A fine romance, my friend, this is.
     
    Dorothy Fields 1905–74 American songwriter: ‘A Fine Romance’ (1936 song)
  4. To let a fool kiss you is stupid,
    To let a kiss fool you is worse.
     
    E. Y. (‘Yip’) Harburg 1898–1981 American songwriter: ‘Inscriptions on a Lipstick’ (1965)
  5. Where do the noses go? I always wondered where the noses would go.
    Ernest Hemingway 1899–1961 American novelist: For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940) ch. 7
  6. You must remember this, a kiss is still a kiss,
    A sigh is just a sigh;
    The fundamental things apply,
    As time goes by.
     
    Herman Hupfeld 1894–1951 American songwriter: ‘As Time Goes By’ (1931 song)
  7. If love is the best thing in life, then the best part of love is the kiss.
    Thomas Mann 1875–1955 German novelist: Lotte in Weimar (1939)
  8. I wasn't kissing her, I was just whispering in her mouth.
    on being discovered by his wife with a chorus girl
    Chico Marx 1891–1961 American film comedian: Groucho Marx and Richard J. Anobile Marx Brothers Scrapbook (1973) ch. 24
  9. A kiss can be a comma, a question mark or an exclamation point. That's basic spelling that every woman ought to know.
    Mistinguett 1875–1956 French actress: in Theatre Arts December 1955
  10. O Love, O fire! once he drew
    With one long kiss my whole soul through
    My lips, as sunlight drinketh dew.
     
    Alfred, Lord Tennyson 1809–92 English poet: ‘Fatima’ (1832) st. 3