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date: 20 January 2020

Geoffrey Chaucer c.1343–1400
English poet 

  1. Whan that Aprill with his shoures soote
    The droghte of March hath perced to the roote.
     
    The Canterbury Tales ‘The General Prologue’ l. 1
  2. And smale foweles maken melodye,
    That slepen al the nyght with open ye
    (So priketh hem nature in hir corages),
    Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages.
     
    The Canterbury Tales ‘The General Prologue’ l. 9
  3. He was a verray, parfit gentil knyght.
     
    The Canterbury Tales ‘The General Prologue’ l. 72
  4. He was as fressh as is the month of May.
     
    The Canterbury Tales ‘The General Prologue’ l. 92
  5. And Frenssh she spak ful faire and fetisly,
    After the scole of Stratford atte Bowe,
    For Frenssh of Parys was to hire unknowe.
     
    The Canterbury Tales ‘The General Prologue’ l. 124
  6. And theron heng a brooch of gold ful sheene,
    On which ther was first write a crowned A,
    And after Amor vincit omnia.
     
    The Canterbury Tales ‘The General Prologue’ l. 160; see Virgil
  7. Somwhat he lipsed, for his wantownesse,
    To make his Englissh sweete upon his tonge.
     
    The Canterbury Tales ‘The General Prologue’ l. 264
  8. A Clerk there was of Oxenford also.
     
    The Canterbury Tales ‘The General Prologue’ l. 285
  9. And gladly wolde he lerne and gladly teche.
     
    The Canterbury Tales ‘The General Prologue’ l. 308
  10. Housbondes at chirche dore she hadde fyve.
     
    The Canterbury Tales ‘The General Prologue’ l. 460
  11. The smylere with the knyf under the cloke.
     
    The Canterbury Tales ‘The Knight's Tale’ l. 1999
  12. ‘Tehee!’ quod she, and clapte the wyndow to.
     
    The Canterbury Tales ‘The Miller's Tale’ l. 3739
  13. Mordre wol out; that se we day by day.
     
    The Canterbury Tales ‘The Nun's Priest's Tale’ l. 3052
  14. Wommen desiren to have sovereynetee
    As wel over hir housbond as hir love.
     
    The Canterbury Tales ‘The Wife of Bath's Tale’ l. 1038
  15. And she was fayr as is the rose in May.
     
    The Legend of Good Women ‘Cleopatra’ l. 613
  16. That lyf so short,
    the craft so long to lerne.
     
    The Parliament of Fowls l. 1; see Hippocrates
  17. For of fortunes sharpe adversitee
    The worst kynde of infortune is this,
    A man to han ben in prosperitee,
    And it remembren, whan it passed is.
     
    Troilus and Criseyde bk. 3, l. 1625; see Boethius
  18. Go, litel bok, go, litel myn tragedye.
     
    Troilus and Criseyde bk. 5, l. 1786
  19. The erratik sterres, herkenyng armonye
    With sownes ful of hevenyssh melodie.
     
    Troilus and Criseyde bk. 5, l. 1816
  20. O yonge, fresshe folkes, he or she,
    In which that love up groweth with youre age.
     
    Troilus and Criseyde bk. 5, l. 1835
  21. O moral Gower, this book I directe
    To the.
     
    Troilus and Criseyde bk. 5, l. 1856