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date: 15 October 2019

Robert Louis Stevenson 1850–94
Scottish novelist. See also Stanley 

  1. Every one lives by selling something.
    Across the Plains (1892) ‘Beggars’ pt. 3
  2. Here lies one who meant well, tried a little, failed much:—surely that may be his epitaph, of which he need not be ashamed.
    Across the Plains (1892) ‘A Christmas Sermon’ pt. 4
  3. If your morals make you dreary, depend upon it they are wrong.
    Across the Plains (1892) ‘A Christmas Sermon’
  4. The world is so great and I am so small,
    I do not like it at all, at all.
     
    couplet rejected for A Child's Garden of Verses (1885); see Stevenson
  5. Our business in this world is not to succeed, but to continue to fail, in good spirits.
    Ethical Studies (1924) ‘Lay Morals and Other Ethical Papers’
  6. Politics is perhaps the only profession for which no preparation is thought necessary.
    Familiar Studies of Men and Books (1882) ‘Yoshida-Torajiro’
  7. I've a grand memory for forgetting, David.
    Kidnapped (1886) ch. 18
  8. I kept always two books in my pocket, one to read, one to write in.
    Memories and Portraits (1887)
  9. Wine is bottled poetry.
    The Silverado Squatters (1883)
  10. The strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.
    title of novel, 1886
  11. Man is not truly one, but truly two.
    The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886)
  12. I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel's sake. The great affair is to move.
    Travels with a Donkey (1879) ‘Cheylard and Luc’
  13. I own I like definite form in what my eyes are to rest upon; and if landscapes were sold, like the sheets of characters of my boyhood, one penny plain and twopence coloured, I should go the length of twopence every day of my life.
    Travels with a Donkey (1879) ‘Father Apollinaris’
  14. Fifteen men on the dead man's chest
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!
    Drink and the devil had done for the rest—
    Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!
     
    Treasure Island (1883) ch. 1
  15. Tip me the black spot.
    Treasure Island (1883) ch. 3
  16. Pieces of eight, pieces of eight, pieces of eight!
    Treasure Island (1883) ch. 10
  17. Many's the long night I've dreamed of cheese—toasted, mostly.
    Treasure Island (1883) ch. 15
  18. There is no duty we so much underrate as the duty of being happy.
    Virginibus Puerisque (1881) ‘An Apology for Idlers’
  19. He sows hurry and reaps indigestion.
    Virginibus Puerisque (1881) ‘An Apology for Idlers’
  20. To travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive, and the true success is to labour.
    Virginibus Puerisque (1881) ‘El Dorado’
  21. Marriage is like life in this—that it is a field of battle, and not a bed of roses.
    Virginibus Puerisque (1881) title essay, pt. 1
  22. The cruellest lies are often told in silence.
    Virginibus Puerisque (1881) title essay, pt. 4
  23. What hangs people…is the unfortunate circumstance of guilt.
    The Wrong Box (with Lloyd Osbourne, 1889)
  24. In winter I get up at night
    And dress by yellow candle-light.
    In summer, quite the other way,—
    I have to go to bed by day.
     
    A Child's Garden of Verses (1885) ‘Bed in Summer’
  25. The world is so full of a number of things,
    I'm sure we should all be as happy as kings.
     
    A Child's Garden of Verses (1885) ‘Happy Thought’; see Stevenson
  26. I was the giant great and still
    That sits upon the pillow-hill,
    And sees before him, dale and plain,
    The pleasant land of counterpane.
     
    A Child's Garden of Verses (1885) ‘The Land of Counterpane’
  27. I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me,
    And what can be the use of him is more than I can see.
     
    A Child's Garden of Verses (1885) ‘My Shadow’
  28. Must we to bed indeed? Well then,
    Let us arise and go like men,
    And face with an undaunted tread
    The long black passage up to bed.
     
    A Child's Garden of Verses (1885) ‘North-West Passage. Good-Night’
  29. I will make you brooches and toys for your delight
    Of bird-song at morning and star-shine at night.
     
    Songs of Travel (1896) ‘I will make you brooches and toys for your delight’
  30. Sing me a song of a lad that is gone,
    Say, could that lad be I?
    Merry of soul he sailed on a day
    Over the sea to Skye.
     
    Songs of Travel (1896) ‘Sing me a song of a lad that is gone’
  31. Give to me the life I love,
    Let the lave go by me,
    Give the jolly heaven above
    And the byway nigh me.
     
    Songs of Travel (1896) ‘The Vagabond’
  32. Wealth I seek not, hope nor love,
    Nor a friend to know me;
    All I seek, the heaven above
    And the road below me.
     
    Songs of Travel (1896) ‘The Vagabond’
  33. Under the wide and starry sky
    Dig the grave and let me lie.
    Glad did I live and gladly die.
     
    Underwoods (1887) ‘Requiem’
  34. This be the verse you grave for me:
    ‘Here he lies where he longed to be;
    Home is the sailor, home from sea,
    And the hunter home from the hill.’
     
    Underwoods (1887) ‘Requiem’