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Subscriber: null; date: 16 October 2019

CATEGORY

Source:
Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon
Author(s):
Barbara CassinBarbara Cassin

CATEGORY 

“Category” is derived, via Vulgar Latin, from the Greek katêgoria [ϰατηγορία‎], (kata [ϰατά‎], against, on, and agoreuô [ἀγορεύω‎], speak in public), which designates both the prosecution in a trial and the attribution in a logical proposition—that is, the questions that must be asked with regard to a subject and the answers that can be given. From Aristotle to Kant and beyond, logic has therefore determined a list of “categories” that are as well operations of judgment (cf. JUSTICE); see ESTI (esp. Box 1) and HOMONYM. On the lexical networks implied by this ontological systematics, see BEGRIFF, MERKMAL, PREDICATION, PROPOSITION, SUBJECT, and cf. ESSENCE, PROPERTY, TO BE, TRUTH, UNIVERSALS.

AUFHEBEN, GENRE, OBJECT, PRINCIPLE, WHOLE