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stoneware

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Stoneware

Stoneware   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Dead Sea Scrolls

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008

Being easily available raw materials, hard limestone and basalt were used for a wide range of domestic ware and utensils:

Stoneware

Stoneware   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
275 words
Illustration(s):
1

Pottery made from a secondary clay needing a higher firing temperature (1200–1300°C) than earthenware. These temperatures facilitate vitrification, while requiring

stoneware

stoneware   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
219 words
Pottery made of clay and a fusible stone (usually feldspar) fired at high temperatures to achieve vitrification of the stone (but not the clay). Stoneware is non-porous, and glazing is ... More
stoneware

stoneware   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
75 words
A hard, dense *pottery, vitrified and non-porous after a single firing. It was first produced in the Rhineland in the Middle Ages and from the 17th century in England. It was usually white ... More

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