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Snakes

Snakes   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
364 words

(sing. ὄφις) or serpents. Despite the general interest of Byz., zoological treatises on snakes have not survived. Sporadic information on ...

Snakes

Snakes   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

Snakes (ḥfʒw was the most common Egyptian term for the members of the suborder Ophidia) were found throughout ...

Snakes

Snakes   Reference library

The New Encyclopedia of Reptiles and Amphibians (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
18,296 words
Illustration(s):
30

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snake

snake   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
119 words

Any of c.2,700 species of legless, elongated reptiles forming the suborder Serpentes of the order Squamata (which also includes ...

snakes

snakes   Quick reference

A Dictionary of the Bible (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Religion
Length:
69 words

Common in Palestine, and often mentioned in the Bible from Gen. 3: 14 onwards. There existed cobras and vipers. In ...

snakes

snakes   Reference library

Irad Malkin

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
492 words
were regarded in Greek and Roman religion mostly as guardians, e.g. of houses, tombs, springs, and altars. Snakes appear as attributes of bell-shaped idols in Minoan houses and small ... More
snake

snake   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
proverbial allusions to the snake focus on its venomous bite as representing a lurking danger; it is a type of deceit and treachery, as with reference to the fable by Aesop, in which the ... More

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