Update
The Oxford Biblical Studies Online and Oxford Islamic Studies Online have retired. Content you previously purchased on Oxford Biblical Studies Online or Oxford Islamic Studies Online has now moved to Oxford Reference, Oxford Handbooks Online, Oxford Scholarship Online, or What Everyone Needs to Know®. For information on how to continue to view articles visit the subscriber services page.
Dismiss

Overview

iconoclasm

Return to overview »

You are looking at 1-9 of 9 entries

View:

Iconoclasm and Iconophobia

Iconoclasm and Iconophobia   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
3,517 words

The Renaissance humanists believed that the arts had their origins in the praise and invocation of the gods. But the

Iconoclasm

Iconoclasm   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Religion
Length:
3,158 words

The term iconoclasm can be understood on two levels, abstractly or concretely. In a figurative or abstract sense, an iconoclast

Iconoclasm

Iconoclasm   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
220 words

(Gk., ‘image-breaking’).

A movement which agitated the Church in the E. Roman Empire, c.725–843. The veneration of icons

Iconoclasm

Iconoclasm   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
1,243 words

The destruction of images, particularly for religious reasons. The word is also used more broadly, however, to refer to the

iconography: iconoclasm

iconography: iconoclasm   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
268 words

During the periods 726–87 and 815–43 icon veneration was banned in the Byzantine empire: figural images of Christ and the

iconoclasm

iconoclasm   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Scottish History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
397 words

of the Reformation has left an indelible mark on Scottish history. The country's medieval churches and abbeys seem to have

iconoclasm

iconoclasm   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Western Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
857 words

means image breaking and, as such, is a term applied to any period where the destruction of images has taken

iconoclasm

iconoclasm   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
1,464 words

The name “iconoclasm”, which means etymologically the breaking (kla-ô, I break) of Images (eikôn), has been

Iconoclasm

Iconoclasm   Reference library

Paul A. Hollingsworth and Anthony Cutler

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
1,327 words
(from εἰκονοκλάστης, “imagedestroyer”), a religious movement of the 8th and 9th C. that denied the holiness of Icons and rejected icon veneration. Clerical opposition to the artistic ... More

View: