You are looking at 1-7 of 7 entries  for:

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology x
clear all

Did you mean Eri'danus, Danú Eri'danus, Danú

View:

Danu

Danu   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

... , Dana . . Speculative name for the mother goddess of the Continental Celts based on the evidence of place-names, e.g. Danube (L Dānuvius ; Hungarian Duna ; German Donau ); also a variant for the Irish Ana (a prosthetic d -= Ana ) and linked to the Welsh Dôn . Other goddesses named Danu appear as far afield as Russia and India; in India's Rig-Veda the name of the goddess Danu signifies ‘stream’ and ‘the waters of...

Dôn

Dôn   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

.... Welsh name for the Celtic mother-goddess, whose name in Continental Europe may have been Danu ; counterpart of the Irish Ana , goddess of the Tuatha Dé Danann . Surviving Welsh literature, especially the fourth branch of the Mabinogi , tells us more about Dôn than we can know about either Danu or Ana. Sister of Math fab Mathonwy, she bore at least five important children, the daughter Arianrhod and the sons Gwydion , Gilfaethwy , Gofannon , and Amaethon ; in the Triads her husband is given as Beli . She may have had powers over fertility. The...

Kerry

Kerry   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...[Ir. Ciarraighe Ciarraí ]. South-westernmost county of Ireland, western Munster , occupying, 1,815 square miles deeply indented by Dingle, Kenmare, and other bays. Kerry has rich associations in Irish mythology and folklore, is the reputed home of Ana (or Danu), for whom the Tuatha Dé Danann are named, and is also the realm of the Cailleach Bhéirre . The county takes its name from Ciar , a love-child of Queen Medb and Fergus mac Róich ; his descendants settled west of the Abbeyfeale River. Kerry is a common invasion route in the Lebor Gabála ...

Ana

Ana   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...goddess of pre-Christian Ireland, the mother or ‘nourisher’ of the Tuatha Dé Danann , the ‘people, tribe, or nation of Ana’. In Sanas Cormaic [Cormac's Glossary] (10th cent.), she is Ana, and Ireland may be known as the ‘land of Ana’. A prosthetic D - changes Ana, Anu to Dana, Danu; some commentators advise that these forms are later scholarly inventions, while others point out that the name Dana has discrete associations and parallels. She is most probably the grandmother of Ecne , a personification of knowledge and enlightenment. She may also be the...

Tuatha Dé Danann

Tuatha Dé Danann   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...Tuatha Dé Danann, who are sometimes called Trí Dé Danann [the three gods of Danu/ Ana ] and fir Trí nDéa [men of the three gods]. The phrase Tri Dée Dána [three gods of arts], from which Trí Dé Danann may be derived, describes Brian (1) , Iuchair , and Iucharba , who are also sons of Ana/ Danu and who appear in many episodes of Lebor Gabála ; they are leading characters in Oidheadh Chlainne Tuireann [The Tragic Story of the Children of Tuireann]. Three other sons of Ana/Danu are Goibniu the blacksmith, Credne the artificer or silversmith, and ...

Oidheadh Chlainne Tuireann

Oidheadh Chlainne Tuireann   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...or the Three Sorrowful Stories of Erin] along with the Deirdre story and Oidheadh Chlainne Lir [The Tragic Story of the Children of Lir]. A child of Ogma and Étan (1) , Tuireann fathers three sons, Brian (1), Iuchair, and Iucharba, upon the divine Ana (also Danu) herself; variant texts cite great Brigit as the mother. His paternity complete, Tuireann plays no part in the story. The action begins along the Boyne while the Tuatha Dé Danann are preparing for the great battle with the Fomorians that will be known as Mag Tuired ( see ...

Lebor Gabála Érenn

Lebor Gabála Érenn   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...of their name as ‘men of bags’. The divine origins of the Tuatha Dé Danann are implicit in the usual story of their arrival in Ireland, descending from a dark cloud on a mountain in the west, instead of by ship as other invaders had. Their very name, ‘people of the goddess Danu/ Ana’, may have been invented in the Lebor Gabála , but the phrase Tuatha Dé was earlier used to describe the old gods or to denote the Israelites in translations of the Bible. The complete origin of the name and the precise implications of it are still disputed. Unquestionably...

View: