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wardship

Subject: Law

N. The jurisdiction of the High Court to make a child a ward of court and assume responsibility for its welfare. The jurisdiction is almost unlimited, although subject to ...

wardship

wardship   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
99 words

... . The right of the Crown to hold and administer the estates of heirs of tenants-in-chief until they reached the age of 21, or 14 for an heiress. During this period the Crown received the revenues of the estate and could determine the marriage of the heir or heiress. These rights were enforced from Henry VII's reign ( 1485–1509 ) until the abolition of feudal tenures in 1660 . Wardships were frequently sold to nobility and gentry , and were, of course, lucrative assets. Often wards were married off to a child of the person who got wardship;...

wardship

wardship   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
132 words

... The right of the Crown to hold and administer the estates of heirs of tenants‐in‐chief until they reached the age of 21, or 14 for an heiress. During this period the Crown received the revenues of the estate and could determine the marriage of the heir or heiress. These rights were enforced from Henry VII's reign ( 1485–1509 ) until the abolition of feudal tenures in 1660 . Wardships were frequently sold to nobility and gentry , and were, of course, lucrative assets. Often wards were married off to a child of the person who got wardship; sometimes...

wardship

wardship   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
238 words

... , the right of a feudal lord to retain and profit from the land a deceased tenant had held of him by knight service , until the legal heir came of age. In the medieval period the wardship of the lands of tenants‐in‐chief, who held directly of the crown, was a valuable form of political patronage; such wardships, together with the marriages of the heirs, might be awarded on easy terms to those the king favoured, or simply sold to the highest bidder. The administration of crown wardships was normally entrusted to an official known as the escheator ....

wardship

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A Dictionary of Law (9 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
294 words

...wardship proceedings are useful include: • where parents refuse to consent to medical treatment and it is necessary to take long-term decisions about the child; • where third parties, such as the press, are intruding in a child’s life; • where a child is about to be kidnapped and removed from the jurisdiction. Wardship offers immediate and effective protection in such a case since the moment an application is made, the child becomes a ward of court, and hence can be stopped at a port or airport. The Children Act 1989 has restricted the use of wardship by...

wardship

wardship   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law Enforcement (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Law
Length:
293 words

...of court, and hence can be stopped at a port or airport. The Children Act 1989 has restricted the use of wardship by local authorities and has considerably reduced the need for wardship in private law proceedings, since individual disputes about a child can frequently be settled by a specific issue order or a prohibited steps order . Cases: Re C (A Baby) [ 1996 ] 2 FLR 43 (CA); Re W (Wardship: Discharge: Publicity) [ 1995 ] 2 FLR 466 (CA); A v Liverpool CC [ 1982 ] AC 363...

wardship

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A Dictionary of Social Work and Social Care (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... A power that resides with the High Court to assume responsibility for all aspects of the care of a child. When the High Court makes a child a ward no orders can be made or decisions or actions taken that affect the child without the permission of that court having first been obtained. The High Court effectively becomes the child’s responsible parent. As the Children Act ( 1989 ) confers on courts, including the High Court, the power to make orders relating to children, wardship proceedings are used only in cases where exceptionally complex decisions...

wardship

wardship   Reference library

Antti Arjava

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... and tutelage Roman law placed all fatherless children below puberty under guardianship ( tutela impuberis ). This ended at the age of 12 (girls) or 14 (boys). The guardian ( tutor ) administered the ward’s property, not selling land and avoiding risk. In rich families the father would nominate a guardian in his will . Otherwise the nearest male relative was called to this duty, or a guardian was appointed by a magistrate. Officially, women could not be guardians, although local tradition in Egypt , Palestine , and probably elsewhere had allowed...

wardship

wardship noun   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
23 words
wardship

wardship noun   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
20 words
wardship

wardship noun   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
23 words
wardship

wardship  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The right of the Crown to hold and administer the estates of heirs of tenants‐in‐chief until they reached the age of 21, or 14 for an heiress. During this period the Crown received the revenues of ...
wardship

wardship  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
N.The jurisdiction of the High Court to make a child a ward of court and assume responsibility for its welfare. The jurisdiction is almost unlimited, although subject to consideration of the child's ...
Family and Society

Family and Society   Quick reference

Ralph Houlbrooke

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,144 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...than a dead letter. Civil marriage, introduced in 1653 , lasted only until the Restoration . But Parliament's victory in the Civil War brought, in 1646 , one of the most fundamental changes ever to take place in the family life of the upper classes, the abolition of feudal wardship . Some of its worst abuses had already been removed under the early Stuarts, but its abolition removed for good the fear that predatory guardians might choose unsuitable marriage partners for orphaned heirs. Minorities now became opportunities for beneficial retrenchment. It was...

escheator

escheator  

The royal official responsible for lands which came into the king's hands on a temporary basis, by reason of forfeiture, minority of the heirs of a tenant‐in‐chief (see wardship), or ...
Court of Wards and Liveries

Court of Wards and Liveries  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The court that administered funds received by the monarch for rights of wardship, marriage, and livery. Established in 1541, it was abolished in 1660. Its records are kept at The National Archives in ...
ward of court

ward of court  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
1 A minor under the care of a guardian (appointed by the parents or the court), who exercises rights and duties over the child subject to the general control and discretion of the court.2 A minor in ...
children's guardian

children's guardian  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
A person appointed by the court to protect a minor's interests in proceedings affecting his interests (such as adoption, wardship, or care proceedings), formerly known as a guardian ad litem. Since ...
section 8 order

section 8 order  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Court orders under the Children Act 1989 that settle practical details concerning the child's care and upbringing in any family proceedings in which the child's welfare is a matter for consideration ...
family proceedings

family proceedings  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
All court proceedings under the inherent jurisdiction of the High Court that deal with matters relating to the welfare of children (see welfare principle). Before 1989 the court's powers to make ...
defective titles

defective titles  

A Commission for Defective Titles was first issued by James I in 1606 to enable his subjects ‘to quietly and privately enjoy their private estates and possessions’. The main object ...

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