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transduction

1 The transfer of genetic material from one bacterial cell to another by means of a bacteriophage. 2 The conversion of stimuli detected in the receptor ...

transduction

transduction   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biology (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
44 words

...transduction 1. The transfer of genetic material from one bacterial cell to another by means of a bacteriophage . 2. The conversion of stimuli detected in the receptor cells into electric impulses, which are transported by the nervous system. See also signal transduction...

transduction

transduction n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n . 1. The conversion of energy from one form into another by a transducer . See also sensory transduction . 2. In genetics, the transfer of DNA from one bacterial cell to another by a bacteriophage (a virus that infects a...

transduction

transduction   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
113 words

... 1 (in microbiology) the transfer of genetic information to a bacterium from a bacteriophage or between bacterial or yeast cells mediated by a phage vector. In generalized transduction any of the donor genes may be transduced, whereas in specialized transduction , i.e. by a lysogenic bacteriophage, only those genes at one of the ends of the prophage can be transduced. Abortive transduction occurs when phage DNA is not incorporated into the bacterial genome, but can nevertheless be transmitted in the phage to one of the daughter cells. 2 ...

transduction

transduction   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Genetics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
132 words

... the transfer of bacterial genetic material from one bacterium to another using a phage as a vector. In the case of restrictive or specialized transduction , only a few bacterial genes are transferred. This is because the phage has a specific site of integration on the host chromosome, and only bacterial genes close to this site are transferred. In the case of generalized transduction the phage can integrate at almost any position on the host chromosome, and therefore almost any host gene can be transferred with the virus to a second bacterium....

transduction

transduction   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Plant Sciences (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
46 words

... The transfer of bacterial genetic material from one bacterium to another via a phage. The genetic material of one bacterial cell becomes incorporated into phage particles which, after release from the dead host cell, then act as vectors carrying it to other bacterial...

transduction

transduction   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biomedicine (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...transduction 1. The conversion of a signal from one form to another, e.g. an action potential is transduced into a mechanical movement by muscle; sensory cells transduce a range of signals into nerve impulses. 2. The transfer of a gene from one bacterium to another by a bacteriophage ....

transduction

transduction n.   Quick reference

Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
54 words

... n. the transfer of DNA from one bacterium to another by means of a bacteriophage (phage). Some bacterial DNA is incorporated into the phage. When the host bacterium is destroyed the phage infects another bacterium and introduces the DNA from its previous host, which may become incorporated into the new host’s...

transduction

transduction   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... The transfer of host DNA from one cell to another by a virus...

transduction

transduction   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... Of genetic material; mediated by bacteriophages which, upon disintegration of the host bacteria, co-transfer the genetic material of the virus and parts of the host's DNA to a new...

sensory transduction

sensory transduction   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

...transduction Transformation of energy from a stimulus into a nerve...

abortive transduction

abortive transduction   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Genetics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
30 words

...transduction failure of a transducing exogenote to become integrated into the host chromosome, but rather existing as a nonreplicating particle in only one cell of a clone. See transduction...

abortive transduction

abortive transduction   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
40 words

...transduction a type of transduction in which the donor DNA is not integrated with the recipient chromosome but persists as a nonreplicating fragment that can function physiologically and can be transmitted to one daughter cell at each cell...

signal transduction

signal transduction   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biology (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
136 words

...which act to turn signal transduction pathways on and off. Other important components of signal transduction include protein kinases , which activate enzymes by transferring a phosphate group from ATP. See also ionotropic receptor ; metabotropic receptor . http://www.abcam.com/pathways/scientific-pathway-poster-library Free downloads of posters for cell signal pathways from Cambridge-based bioreagents company...

signal transduction

signal transduction   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biomedicine (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...signal transduction ( signal–response coupling ) The sequence of events by which an extracellular signal such as a hormone or light brings about a change in cellular activity. It may involve binding of a molecule to a cell surface receptor that changes the properties of that receptor triggering, in turn, the production of a second messenger which then alters the activity of some effector system. In many cases the intermediate steps provide some amplification so that a single binding event triggers the flow of many ions or the production of many second messenger...

sensory transduction

sensory transduction n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...transduction n . The conversion by a sensory receptor of any of a number of different forms of energy into nerve impulses or action potentials . Touch receptors supply kinetic energy; photoreceptors, light; auditory receptors, sound; temperature receptors, heat; olfactory and taste receptors, energy from chemical reactions; and electroreceptors in some species of fish, electrical energy. See also transducer . [From sensory + Latin transducere to lead across, from trans across + ducere, ductum to lead + -ion indicating an action,...

signal transduction

signal transduction   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
117 words

...transduction the process by which an extracellular signal (chemical, electrical, or mechanical) is converted into a cellular response. Typically, interaction of a hormone, growth factor, or other agonist with a specific membrane receptor leads to signal amplification by synthesis within the cell of one or more second messengers , or to activation of other downstream cascades, e.g. by phosphorylation of proteins. Chemical agonists that cross the cell membrane (e.g. steroid hormones) produce a cellular response without such amplification of the signal....

F-mediated transduction

F-mediated transduction   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Genetics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
3 words

...transduction...

high‐frequency transduction

high‐frequency transduction   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
20 words

...transduction abbr. : HFT; any transduction in which the transducing phage(s) constitute a large proportion of the total phage...

cellular signal transduction

cellular signal transduction   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Genetics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
106 words

...signal transduction the pathways through which cells receive external signals and transmit, amplify, and direct them internally. The pathway begins with cell-surface receptors ( q.v .) and may end in the cell nucleus with DNA-binding proteins that suppress or activate replication or transcription. Signaling pathways require intercommunicating chains of proteins that transmit the signal in a stepwise fashion. Protein kinases ( q.v .) often participate in this cascade of reactions, since many signal transductions involve receiving an extracellular,...

two‐component signal transduction

two‐component signal transduction   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
58 words

...signal transduction a system used by bacteria and lower eukaryotes to adapt to the prevailing environmental and nutrition conditions. A typical system comprises a sensor histidine kinase and a cognate response regulator . In response to a particular stimulus, the activated sensor kinase phosphorylates its cognate response regulator. This activated response regulator then effects changes in gene...

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