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tolerance

1 In instrumentation, the limit of allowable error. 2 In immunology, ability to accept antigenic stimuli without adverse reaction. ...

tolerance

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A Dictionary of Nursing (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
60 words

...tolerance [ tol -er-ăns] n. the reduction or loss of the normal response to a substance that usually provokes a reaction in the body. drug t. tolerance that may develop after taking a particular drug over a long period of time. In such cases increased doses are necessary to produce the desired effect. See also glucose tolerance test , immunological tolerance...

tolerance

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Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
113 words

... n. the reduction or loss of the normal response to a drug or other substance that usually provokes a reaction in the body. Drug tolerance 1. may develop after taking a particular drug over a long period of time. In such cases increased doses are necessary to produce the desired effect. Some drugs that cause tolerance also cause dependence . See also glucose tolerance test ; immunological tolerance ; tachyphylaxis . 2. acceptance of others whose beliefs, customs, behaviour, or lifestyle are different from one’s own or from accepted social...

tolerance

tolerance   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
92 words

... 1 the progressive attenuation of the response to an agent (usually a drug) whereby increasing concentrations of the agent are required to maintain the response. Underlying mechanisms confer either functional (or pharmacodynamic) tolerance, where the loss of response is due to desensitization of effector mechanisms, or metabolic (or pharmacokinetic) tolerance, whereby elimination of the agent is accelerated usually by induction of catabolic enzymes or other inactivating mechanism. 2 the ability of an organism to grow and thrive in an unfavourable...

tolerance

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A Dictionary of Electronics and Electrical Engineering (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... The maximum permissible error or variation permitted in the electrical properties or physical dimensions of any component or device. ...

Tolerance

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A Dictionary of Epidemiology (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...Tolerance In toxicology and pharmacology, the adaptive state characterized by diminished effects of a particular dose of a substance. ...

tolerance

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A Dictionary of Chemical Engineering

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...tolerance A range of physical dimensions of an object within which the true dimensions lie. It is used in machining components such as the meshing gears where clearance must be controlled. ...

tolerance

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A Dictionary of Social Work and Social Care (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... The body’s gradual adaption to taking a drug so that increasing amounts are needed in order to gain the desired effect. See also addiction ....

tolerance

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The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... 1 The capacity to endure pain or hardship, such as harsh environmental conditions or psychological stress. 2 Condition in which increasing doses of a drug are required to maintain the same response. See also drug tolerance . 3 Failure of a body to mount a specific immune response against a particular antigen. Such immunological tolerance usually results from the body having difficulty distinguishing between its own materials that should be tolerated, and foreign materials that should be attacked by...

tolerance

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A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... The ability of an organism to survive environmental conditions. The prefixes eury - and steno - refer to wide and narrow ranges of tolerance respectively. An organism can be widely tolerant of one factor, such as temperature, but narrowly tolerant of another, such as salinity. The climatic tolerance thesis is that boundaries to the distribution of life forms and species often coincide with isometric lines of climatological variables ( Grace (1987) New Phytologist 106, 1 ); see Ruggiero (2001) J. Biogeog. 28, 10...

tolerance

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A Dictionary of Dentistry (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Dentistry
Length:
42 words

... n. A characteristic of substance dependence that may be shown by the need for markedly increased amounts of the substance to achieve intoxication or the desired effect. It may develop after taking a particular drug over a long period of...

tolerance

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A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... ( permissible deviation ) The discrepancy allowed between an exact location or fit, and one that deviates slightly, but is still acceptable and functions. When setting out, cutting, manufacturing, and fitting, it is normal to attempt to obtain total accuracy but, in practice, the process often results in slight variation. As long as the variation is within the acceptable tolerance, then functionality will still be...

tolerance

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A Dictionary of Biology (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
211 words

...tolerance 1. The ability of an organism to withstand extreme variations in environmental conditions, such as drought. 2. The build-up of resistance to drugs or other chemicals (such as pesticides), which occurs after prolonged use or application. Increasingly large doses of the chemical are required to produce the desired effect in the organism. 3. ( immunological tolerance ) The phenomenon by which the cells of the immune system are constrained from mounting an immune response against ‘self’ tissues. During their development and maturation, lymphocyte...

tolerance

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A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n . 1. The quality of being able or willing to accept the behaviour of others. 2. The capacity to withstand extreme conditions or circumstances. 3. In relation to drugs such as narcotic analgesics, dopamine antagonists, and barbiturates , a tendency to require ever-increasing dosages of the drug to achieve a desired effect, or a markedly diminished effectiveness with continuation of the same dosages, caused by various mechanisms that reduce the number of drug molecules reaching neuroreceptor sites on target cells or that involve compensatory...

Tolerance

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Daniel Mansuy and Manfred Svensson

The Oxford Guide to the Historical Reception of Augustine

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
2,599 words

... given that he obviously sees tolerance as a dependent and therefore secondary concept. There is, furthermore, an aspect where Aug. may help to correct some modern conceptions of tolerance. The modern period, in fact, has extended tolerance in many ways, but sometimes at the cost of conceptual confusion. As we have seen in Aug.'s very explicit identification of tolerance with virtues like patience or endurance, he defines the specific scope of tolerance as a virtue needed to deal ...

Tolerance

Tolerance   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
556 words

... The notion of tolerance cannot be properly understood in the Middle Ages if we forget that the West understood itself as Christendom and that unity came a from common faith . Church and State had identical attitudes at this time. Ecclesia and Imperium were progressively confused. We must distinguish tolerance towards those who were not Christians from the attitude shown to heretics . The principle of tolerance in the Middle Ages is to be understood in the light of the unifying principle of faith and the fusion between Church and State at...

Tolerance

Tolerance   Reference library

Anas Malik

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Politics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Politics
Length:
1,626 words

... . “Tolerance” has been defined as a “double negation”: a negative appraisal of something others do, followed by a decision not to interfere with it, despite one's capacity for doing so. Comments on tolerance in Islam arise in a polarized political situation. The clash-of-civilizations narrative posits the “West” in conflict with an incompatible Islam, often painted as intolerant, illiberal, and hostile. Underlying assumptions about a monolithic Islam and a Muslim cultural essence are repeatedly questioned in academic scholarship but remain entrenched in...

Tolerance

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A Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
557 words

... Religious tolerance is, in the main, a modern idea advanced by thinkers such as Spinoza , John Locke , and John Stuart Mill , who broke consciously with tradition in this matter. Pre-modern Judaism, like pre-modern Christianity and Islam, held that there could be no toleration of religious viewpoints other than its own. Jews with a historical sense appreciate that certain ideas acceptable in a pluralistic society are simply not found in the classical sources but are none the worse for that. The most striking fact which emerges from the biblical...

Tolerance

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Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
265 words

...Human diversity makes tolerance more than a virtue, it makes it a requirement for survival. René Dubos 1901 – 82 French -born American microbiologist Celebrations of Life (1981) Make hatred hated! Anatole France 1844 – 1924 French novelist and man of letters speech to public school teachers in Tours, August 1919 Tolerance is only another name for indifference. W. Somerset Maugham 1874 – 1965 English novelist A Writer's Notebook (1949) written in 1896 We should therefore claim, in the name of tolerance, the right not to tolerate...

tolerance

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Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... ; toleration . The former is the quality, the latter the act or practice. As a matter of word frequency, toleration occurred much more often in print sources than tolerance during the 17th to 19th centuries, but the position was reversed about the time of World War I: since 1914 , tolerance has consistently appeared in print more frequently than toleration...

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A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... The ability of an organism to survive exposure to potentially harmful amounts of a substance without showing an adverse...

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