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Thomas Lodge

Subject: Literature

( c.1557–1625) English author of Rosalynde; his Wit's Misery (1596) refers to an Ur-Hamlet: ‘the vizard of the ghost which cried so miserably at the Theatre, like an oyster-wife, ...

Lodge, Thomas

Lodge, Thomas (1558–1625)   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to Literary Britain & Ireland (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature, Society and culture
Length:
39 words

..., Thomas ( 1558–1625 ), poet , playwright , novelist , literary apologist , and doctor : educ. London ( City : Merchant Taylors' School, Suffolk Lane) and Oxford ( Trinity College ); enters Lincoln's Inn, London ( Holborn ) 1576 . A Defence of Plays 1580 , Phillis 1593...

Lodge, Thomas

Lodge, Thomas (c.1557–1625)   Quick reference

An A-Z Guide to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

..., Thomas ( c. 1557–1625 ) English author of Rosalynde ; his Wit's Misery ( 1596 ) refers to an Ur-Hamlet : ‘the vizard of the ghost which cried so miserably at the Theatre, like an oyster-wife, “Hamlet,...

Lodge, Thomas

Lodge, Thomas   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

..., Thomas ( 1558–1625 ), English writer. Son of the lord mayor of London, and educated at Oxford, Lodge is now chiefly remembered for his prose romance Rosalynde ( 1590 ), which tells the same story as Shakespeare 's As You Like It . Other romances include Scillaes Metamorphosis ( 1589 ) and A Margarite of America ( 1596 ); he also wrote a play and published a collection of satirical verse, before training as a physician. Dictionary of National Biography...

Lodge, Thomas

Lodge, Thomas (1558–1625)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Writers and their Works (3 ed.)

..., Thomas ( 1558–1625 ) English poet , dramatist , pamphleteer , and fiction writer An Alarum Against Usurers ( 1584 ) Miscellaneous Scillaes Metamorphosis ( 1589 ) Poetry Rosalynde: Euphues Golden Legacie ( 1590 ) Fiction Robert Second Duke of Normandy, Surnamed Robin the Divell ( 1591 ) Fiction Euphues Shadow, the Battaile of the Sences ( 1592 ) Fiction The Life and Death of William Long Beard ( 1593 ) Fiction Phillis ( 1593 ) Poetry The Wounds of Civill War ( 1594 ) Drama A Fig for Momus ( 1595 ) Poetry A Margarite of America (...

Lodge, Thomas

Lodge, Thomas (1557/8?–1625)   Reference library

Jane Kingsley-Smith

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

..., Thomas ( 1557/8?–1625 ), poet , dramatist , and prose-writer , son of the lord mayor of London, and University Wit. Lodge ’s literary career spanned many genres including contemporary satire, literary criticism ( A Defence of Poetry , 1580 ), two plays ( The Wounds of Civil War , 1588 , and A Looking Glass for London and England , 1590 ), and various pastoral romances. It was the romance Rosalynde, Euphues Golden Legacy , published in 1590 , that garnered Lodge the most praise in his lifetime and caught Shakespeare’s attention. Its popularity...

Lodge, Thomas

Lodge, Thomas (1558–1625)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
440 words

..., Thomas ( 1558–1625 ) Writer and doctor , son of Sir Thomas Lodge , lord mayor of London, educated at Merchant Taylors' School, London, and Trinity College, Oxford. He was a student of Lincoln's Inn in 1578 and seems to have converted to Roman Catholicism c. 1580 . In 1579–80 he published an anonymous Defence of Poetry , a reply to Stephen Gosson 's School of Abuse , and in 1584 An Alarum against Usurers (dedicated to Philip Sidney ), depicting the dangers that moneylenders present to young spendthrifts. Appended to it was a prose...

Lodge, Thomas

Lodge, Thomas (1558–1625)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
314 words

..., Thomas ( 1558–1625 ) Writer and doctor , he seems to have converted to Roman Catholicism c. 1580 . In 1579–80 he published an anonymous Defence of Poetry , a reply to Stephen Gosson 's School of Abuse , and in 1584 An Alarum against Usurers (dedicated to Philip Sidney ). Appended to it was a prose romance, Forbonius and Prisceria . Scilla's Metamorphosis , an Ovidian verse fable, was published in 1589 . In 1585 and 1586 Lodge may have sailed on a privateering expedition to the Terceras and the Canaries; he said he wrote his best‐known...

Thomas Lodge

Thomas Lodge (1558–1625)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
109 words

...0Thomas Thomas Lodge 1558 – 1625 English man of letters and physician Love in my bosom like a bee Doth suck his sweet; Now with his wings he plays with me, Now with his feet. ‘Love in my bosom like a bee’ (1590) love in my bosom in my bosom like a bee in my bosom like a bee Love guards the roses of thy lips And flies about them like a bee; If I approach he forward skips, And if I kiss he stingeth me. ‘Love guards the roses of thy lips’ (1593) love guards the roses roses of thy lips roses of thy lips Love in thine ...

Lodge, (Thomas) Henry

Lodge, (Thomas) Henry (9 Feb 1884)   Reference library

Richard Zimmerman and Tim Smolko

The Grove Dictionary of American Music (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
476 words

..., (Thomas) Henry ( b Providence, RI , 9 Feb 1884 ; d West Palm Beach, FL , 16 Feb 1953 ). Pianist and composer . He began composing in his teens and had at least three pieces published in 1904 (two songs and a march). Lodge worked in Providence as a piano demonstrator and salesman, then as a school teacher for several years before moving to New York City in 1912 . Between 1904 and 1918 he published some 17 rags and ragtime blues with various firms in New York and Boston. Along with composing, he played piano in theater and dance orchestras...

Thomas Lodge

Thomas Lodge  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
( c.1557–1625)English author of Rosalynde; his Wit's Misery (1596) refers to an Ur-Hamlet: ‘the vizard of the ghost which cried so miserably at the Theatre, like an oyster-wife, “Hamlet, revenge!”’
As You Like It

As You Like It   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,253 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...‘It was a lover and his lass’ (sung in 5.3) in Thomas Morley ’s First Book of Airs in 1600 would appear to support this dating. Text: Despite the Stationers’ Register entry of 1600 the play was not printed until the First Folio appeared in 1623 . The Folio supplies a generally reliable text which, lacking distinctively authorial spellings and errors, was probably set from a Promptbook , or perhaps a literary transcript of foul papers . Sources: The main plot of As You Like It derives from Thomas Lodge ’s Rosalynde ( 1590 ), a prose tale...

A Lover’s Complaint

A Lover’s Complaint   Reference library

Michael Dobson

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
1,103 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...this poem, believing it to have been an inferior work foisted on Shakespeare by Thomas Thorpe . It was only after Kenneth Muir and MacDonald P. Jackson independently vindicated the poem’s authenticity in 1964 and 1965 that more commentators began to find the poem of interest, particularly in relation to the Sonnets it follows. It was pointed out that in placing this poem after the last of the Sonnets Shakespeare might have been following the examples of Thomas Lodge and Samuel Daniel , who had both appended poems in which seduced women lament...

The Rape of Lucrece

The Rape of Lucrece   Reference library

Michael Dobson

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
1,732 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...forceful display of rhetoric. Critical history: The popularity reflected by the proliferation of early editions of The Rape of Lucrece is confirmed by allusions and imitations: it was praised by Thomas Freeman in 1614 (‘Who loves chaste life, there’s Lucrece for a teacher’), and imitated by Thomas Middleton (in The Ghost of Lucrece , 1600 ), Thomas Heywood (in his play The Rape of Lucrece , published in 1608 ), and John Quarles , whose ‘Tarquin Banished; or, The Reward of Lust’ was appended to the 1655 edition of Shakespeare’s poem. After...

Venus and Adonis

Venus and Adonis   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Will Sharpe

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
1,978 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...stories in Ovid (principally those of Salmacis and Hermaphroditus, and Echo and Narcissus, the latter cited by Venus at l. 161), and in part by a growing fashion for the Ovidian ‘erotic epyllion’ (miniature epic on an amorous theme) which had begun with the publication of Thomas Lodge ’s Scilla’s Metamorphosis in 1589 (written in the same six-line stanzaic form Shakespeare adopts here, rhyming ababcc ). This vogue would find its most famous expression in Marlowe ’s Hero and Leander , not published until 1598 but composed at around the same time as...

The Poor

The Poor   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,036 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...were recorded. From 1904 birth certificates do not state that a birth took place in a workhouse; instead the number and the street occupied by the workhouse was recorded. Sometimes, euphemistic names were given for London workhouses, such as Twyford Lodge for Willesden Workhouse Infirmary and The Lodge, Bancroft Road, for Mile End Workhouse. For background, see Simon Fowler , The Workhouse: The People, the Places, the Life Behind (2006) , Norman Longmate , The Workhouse: A Social History (2003) , Felix Driver , Power and Pauperism: The Workhouse...

Richard III

Richard III   Reference library

Randall Martin and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,559 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...of York. 3.1 Prince Edward is welcomed to London by the lords and Mayor but misses his absent mother and brother. Against his better judgement, the Cardinal is persuaded to fetch the Duke of York out of sanctuary. The young princes reluctantly submit to Gloucester’s advice to lodge temporarily in the Tower. Catesby is sent to find out Hastings’s opinion about the idea of Gloucester becoming king. Gloucester promises Buckingham the earldom of Hereford for his support after he is crowned. 3.2 Lord Stanley’s messenger reports to Hastings his master’s dreams of...

Slavery

Slavery   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,891 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...forged by the anti-slave trade movement enabled the campaign to claim to be the most popular movement demanding major political change. Demands for the abolition of the slave trade—the easiest, most practical entrée to the wider problem of colonial slavery itself—were firmly lodged in parliament and supported by a massive national base well before the upheavals of 1789 . The Revolution changed everything of course. Initially, the simple weight and logic of the Revolution's basic ideology—the rights of man—gave abolition added impetus. But for many of the...

Central Government, Courts, and Taxation

Central Government, Courts, and Taxation   Quick reference

R. W. Hoyle

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
7,753 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Their arrangement in termly files or rolls, which generally lack modern indexes to their contents, has discouraged their use. The attraction of Chancery, Star Chamber, and Requests is their use of English bill procedure. This allowed both plaintiffs and defendants to lodge with the court colourful, anecdotal, and often tendentious accounts of their mishaps, frequently at great length. These are then enlarged upon by copious depositions and examinations. Although some of their records are lost (the decree and order books of Star Chamber, together...

Sesquipedality

Sesquipedality   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
2,158 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...he enucleated her. He cut her head off, and then he took her eyes out.” Ibid. at 72. • synaesthesia : “The synaesthesia (mixing of senses) of ‘visible sob’ might seem too rich to apply to a golf ball, if it didn't occupy the climactic position in the description.” David Lodge , The Art of Fiction 148 ( 1992 ). The third stance is that if you know you’re writing for a specific audience with a prodigious, specialized vocabulary—whether one particular reader or the intelligentsia generally—then use hard words that are truly unsimplifiable. But question...

Actors' Order of Friendship

Actors' Order of Friendship  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A fraternal order for performers chartered in Philadelphia in 1849, its first lodge was called the Shakespeare Lodge. In 1888 a New York City branch, the Edwin Forrest Lodge, was ...

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