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theatre of silence

Also called ‘theatre of the unexpressed’. Term applied to a group of French writers of the 1920s, led by Gaston Baty, Jean-Jacques Bernard and Denys Amiel (1884–1977), who rejected ...

theatre of silence

theatre of silence   Reference library

The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
84 words

... of silence Also called ‘theatre of the unexpressed’. Term applied to a group of French writers of the 1920s, led by Gaston Baty , Jean-Jacques Bernard and Denys Amiel ( 1884–1977 ), who rejected traditional ‘literary’ theatre to emphasize, like Maurice Maeterlinck , a ‘hidden’ dialogue behind the spoken words. Chekhov was a precursor of those who exploited silence. Enlisted later were Beckett and Pinter , whose The Caretaker ( 1960 ) contains 143 pauses. Marvin Carlson See also subtext . M. Daniels , The French Drama of the Unspoken ...

Silence, Theatre of

Silence, Theatre of   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
96 words

..., Theatre of , term used for plays which, like those of Maeterlinck , who is regarded as the founder of the genre, and particularly of J.-J. Bernard , are important as much for what they omit from their dialogue as for what they actually say—a theatre, in fact, of pregnant pauses, during which the imagination of the audience supplies the missing ingredient, which is not only unexpressed but perhaps cannot be expressed in words. Hence the French term for this type of play, le théâtre de l'inexprimé . It is also known as the theatre of l'école...

theatre of silence

theatre of silence  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Also called ‘theatre of the unexpressed’. Term applied to a group of French writers of the 1920s, led by Gaston Baty, Jean-Jacques Bernard and Denys Amiel (1884–1977), who rejected traditional ...
Theatre of Silence

Theatre of Silence  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Term used for plays which, like those of Maeterlinck, who is regarded as the founder of the genre, and particularly of J.-J. Bernard, are important as much for what they ...
Henry IV Part 2

Henry IV Part 2   Reference library

Michael Dobson

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,727 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...fear of worsening his sickness. 3.2 In Warwickshire Sir John is welcomed by his old acquaintances Justice Shallow and Justice Silence, where he chooses recruits from among a number of villagers: the fittest of them, Mouldy and Bullcalf, offer bribes, through Bardolph, to be exempted from military service, and Sir John does not select them despite Shallow’s protests, picking the unimpressive Feeble, Wart, and Shadow instead. Alone, Sir John reflects with amusement at the discrepancy between the insignificant Shallow he remembers and the tales he now tells of his...

Venus and Adonis

Venus and Adonis   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Will Sharpe

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
1,978 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

.... It remains one of the few major works in world literature to depict the passionate pursuit of a male object by a female subject. Shakespeare’s auspicious debut in print may owe its existence to the outbreak of plague that closed the London theatres for nearly two years in July 1592 , during which the young playwright apparently turned to an alternative career, as a poet, and to an alternative source of income, a patron. Shakespeare’s dedication of Venus and Adonis to Henry Wriothesley , Earl of Southampton , calls it the ‘first heir of my invention’,...

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,520 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...engraving talents of Robert and George *Cruikshank and the bustling commercial spirit of the 1820s [ see *prints, 22 ]. It is not known whether, on reaching the metropolis, Clare read one of the numerous cheap editions of Life in London , or encountered the torrent of merchandise, ranging from beer-mugs to firescreens, that displayed its leading characters, or, still more likely, attended one of the numerous adaptations of Egan's work being performed at the *theatre [24] ( W. T. Moncrieff 's version of it staged at the Adelphi Theatre ran continuously...

Richard III

Richard III   Reference library

Randall Martin and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,559 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...London, which makes a date of 1592–3 for Richard III more likely. This time frame would explain the absence of any documentary evidence referring to the play before the plague closed the theatres, a silence that seems telling in the view of its later manifest popularity. While it has a large number of roles, Elizabethan doubling practices allow it to be performed with a smaller cast than that required by the earlier Henry VI plays. A date of 1592–3 also supports the theory that publication of the anonymous True Tragedy of Richard the Third ( 1594...

Publishing

Publishing   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,242 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...to define the content and scope of printed matter. Modern historians who assess the effectiveness of British state censorship purely by counting the numbers of successful government prosecutions seriously underestimate the operations of an informal system of harassment which as often as not silenced publishers through the debtors' courts. British governments were adept at avoiding the appearance of state censorship by encouraging the initiatives of private prosecuting societies, such as the *Society for the Suppression of Vice , or by using paid ministerial...

Measure for Measure

Measure for Measure   Reference library

Sonia Massai and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,564 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Measure exemplifies the systematic suppression of diversity. A feminist and a materialist critic have, for example, remarked that if ‘feminist criticism…is restricted to exposing its own exclusion from the text’ ( Kathleen McLuskie , 1985 ), a materialist critic ‘looking for evidence of resistance…[will] find rather further evidence of exploitation’ ( Jonathan Dollimore , 1985 ). Stage history: The Revels accounts for 1604–5 report the only recorded performance prior to the closure of the London theatres in 1642 . During the Restoration, Measure for...

20a The History of the Book in Britain, c.1475–1800

20a The History of the Book in Britain, c.1475–1800   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,011 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of literary property’, since it helped to establish the notion of a ‘public domain’ of works that were available to any publisher who wished to produce an edition at a competitive price (Gray, 197). Among those who took immediate advantage of the new dispensation was John *Bell , proprietor of the ‘British Library’ bookshop on the Strand in London. In 1776 , Bell initiated his ‘Poets of Great Britain Complete from Chaucer to Churchill’, a series running to a total of 109 volumes, priced at 1 s . 6 d . each. He also launched ‘*Bell’s British Theatre ’ in...

Labour History

Labour History   Quick reference

John L. Halstead

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,401 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of English Local Government (10 vols, 1906–29 ). The subject here is not a labour institution, but the parish vestries and the municipal councils which were—or became—the theatre of much ‘labour’ activity. The early part of their remarkable ‘partnership’ can be followed in Royden J. Harrison , The Life and Times of Sidney and Beatrice Webb 1858–1905: The Formative Years ( 2000 ). The edifice of labour institutional history is much developed. We have comprehensive general histories of trade unionism ; an introduction in Henry Pelling , A History of...

Jean-Jacques Bernard

Jean-Jacques Bernard  

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Overview Page
(b. Enghien, France, 30 July 1888; d. Meulan, France, 14 Sept. 1972)Playwright. Bernard's theatre Of silence presents sensitive studies of shy or reticent characters whose silences betray more than ...
anti-play

anti-play  

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Overview Page
A theatre work in which the creator sets out to subvert and counter the theatrical conventions of the day, e.g. by the use of long silences, inactivity, nonsequential plotting or ...
John Silence: Physician Extraordinary

John Silence: Physician Extraordinary  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Algernon Blackwood, 1908, Eveleigh Nash.The eponymous hero is the Sherlock Holmes of the occult, a middle-aged, independently wealthy freelance physician: ‘the cases that especially appealed to him ...
Moves

Moves  

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Overview Page
Ballet in one act with choreography by Robbins. Premiered 3 Jul. 1959 by Ballets USA at Spoleto. Performed in silence, it was described by Robbins as ‘a ballet…about relationships… between people—man ...
Navajo Code Talkers

Navajo Code Talkers  

U.S. military personnel of the Navajo tribe used in World War II, principally in the Pacific theater, to make and receive voice radio transmissions in the Navajo language during combat. ...
Nederlands Dans Theater

Nederlands Dans Theater  

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Overview Page
One of the most successful dance companies in the world, it was founded in 1959 by a group of breakaway dancers from Sonia Gaskell's Netherlands Ballet. They based their new company in The Hague, ...
Anthesteria

Anthesteria  

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Overview Page
A festival of Dionysus, which despite its name (suggesting anthos, flower) was associated esp. with the new wine. It was celebrated in most Ionian communities, but almost all details are known from ...
David Lichine

David Lichine  

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(orig. David Lichtenstein; b Rostov-on-Don, 25 Oct. 1910; d Los Angeles, 26 Jun. 1972)Russian-US dancer, choreographer, and teacher. He studied with Egorova and Nijinska in Paris, making his debut ...

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