Update

You are looking at 1-20 of 2,445 entries  for:

  • All: structures of feeling x
clear all

View:

Overview

structures of feeling

Raymond Williams coined this phrase in Preface to Film (1954) to discuss the relationship between dramatic conventions and written texts. What concerned Williams was the social ...

structures of feeling

structures of feeling   Reference library

Dictionary of the Social Sciences

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
182 words

... of feeling A key and recurring term in Raymond Williams 's studies of culture, structures of feeling refers to the general organization of emotion and experience in a given period—especially as developed along generational lines. It describes the ways in which common values or shared generational experiences shape subjective experience. For Williams, certain social practices, works of art, and literature are the principle records of such structures. Although the term has obvious affinities with the concept of ideology , Williams initially argued...

structures of feeling

structures of feeling   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Media and Communication (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
53 words

... of feeling Distinctive values and ways of organizing experience shared by a generation within a culture and reflected in common patterns and conventions in certain artistic forms and social practices in a particular historical period (Williams). See also age cohort ; cultural materialism ; dominant form ; emergent form ; residual form . ...

structures of feeling

structures of feeling  

Raymond Williams coined this phrase in Preface to Film (1954) to discuss the relationship between dramatic conventions and written texts. What concerned Williams was the social acceptability of ...
structure of feeling

structure of feeling   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Critical Theory

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

...'s concept of hegemony . Hegemony, which can be thought of as either ‘common sense’ or the dominant way of thinking in a particular time and place, can never be total, Williams argued, there must always be an inner dynamic by means of which new formations of thought emerge. Structure of feeling refers to the different ways of thinking vying to emerge at any one time in history. It appears in the gap between the official discourse of policy and regulations, the popular response to official discourse and its appropriation in literary and other cultural...

structure of feeling

structure of feeling   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Critical Theory (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...’s concept of hegemony . Hegemony, which can be thought of as either ‘common sense’ or the dominant way of thinking in a particular time and place, can never be total, Williams argued, there must always be an inner dynamic by means of which new formations of thought emerge. Structure of feeling refers to the different ways of thinking vying to emerge at any one time in history. It appears in the gap between the official discourse of policy and regulations, the popular response to official discourse and its appropriation in literary and other cultural...

Women

Women   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,844 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of his children, that gave Wollstonecraft the critical perspective on masculinity which is so fundamental to her assertion of women's rights, even while it coexists so clearly with her sense of the importance of manly virtue. More clearly than anyone else, Wollstonecraft herself shows the complex consequences for women of this increasing valorization of the masculine, as she veered between identifying herself strongly with the new ideal of manliness and the power of masculine reason on the one hand and feeling intense anger at the exclusion of women...

Novels

Novels   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,137 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and political subjection of women. This form of criticism is seen most clearly in Hays's two novels of the 1790s, Memoirs of Emma Courtney ( 1796 ) and The Victim of Prejudice ( 1799 ). The male counterpart to the heroines of Hays and Wollstonecraft, the ‘man of feeling’, exemplified in the work of Henry *Mackenzie , has almost as complex, and much more under-recognized, a pattern of development and redeployment: Godwin 's Fleetwood: or the New Man of Feeling ( 1805 ) is the most elaborate example. Like the novel of sensibility, what are now called...

Consumerism

Consumerism   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
3,809 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of an ethos is similarly necessary for understanding the counterpart of the capitalist; that is, the consumer. For Campbell, it was not Calvinist theology that was destined to induce a population to turn ‘consumer’, but rather the new epistemology of sensory experience and the aesthetics of subjectivity (‘taste’) developed by * Locke , amplified by Shaftesbury and Hutcheson , and finding fruition in *Romanticism . Consumption was a structure of feeling. Locke's empiricist philosophy created a model of man not as ‘given’ but as the product of...

17 Bookbinding

17 Bookbinding   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
5,252 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
9

...and actively designed covers we are familiar with today. The story of dust jackets and pictorial covers for paperbacks belongs more to design history than bookbinding history, but the importance of these contemporary methods of drawing attention to books by their covers is self-evident. The growth of machine-made cloth binding in the 19 th century led to a corresponding decline in the making and decoration of leather bindings, although the trade never died out. A reaction against a feeling that artistic standards in bookbinding had fallen was initiated in...

Poetry

Poetry   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,432 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...feeling. For our continued influxes of feeling are modified and directed by our thoughts, which are indeed the representatives of all our past feelings; and as by contemplating the relation of these general representatives to each other, we discover what is really important to men, so by the repetition and continuance of this act feelings connected with important subjects will be nourished, till at length, if we be originally possessed of much organic sensibility, such habits of mind will be produced that by obeying blindly and mechanically the impulses of...

Psychology

Psychology   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,151 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and that these conclusions are called ‘common sense’. They are the outcome of the association of our ideas; our experience of one member of a series can make us recall any one of the others without our needing to repeat the entire chain. Thus a feeling of pain or pleasure, or a judgement concerning morality, can be instantly revived by some brief impression before we are able to recall the circumstances that produced the original feeling or judgement. Since these sudden revivals of ideas precede our ability to account for them, they appear fanciful, irrational,...

Poverty

Poverty   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,179 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of public and private domains, in which women of all classes were confined to the household and men to the public, economic, visible, even proto-democratic realm. Elements of this ideology certainly existed. Public-spirited gentlemen who took an interest in poor law business were said to display ‘manlier feeling’, while women writers carved out their own sphere for philanthropy, recommending a distinctly female practice of visiting poor women in their homes to give advice on household economy and childbirth. Poor women were associated with the comforts of...

Architecture

Architecture   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,949 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Caernarvonshire ( 1819–26 ). The disillusion of the time was most completely expressed by the young architect Augustus Welby Northmore *Pugin in Contrasts ( 1836 ). Focusing his anger on the often cheaply built Commissioners Churches, Pugin broadly indicted contemporary architecture for its lack of feeling, contrasting its plain and supposedly morally insincere style with the richly decorated, and therefore deeply spiritual, work of medieval architects. Pugin's damning opinion lives on today in the mythography of modern architecture, but its fierce...

Literary Theory

Literary Theory   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,935 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and then the application of the rules deduced from this enquiry to ‘the imitative arts’. Kant, in contrast, writes that the ‘determining ground’ of the beautiful is ‘the feeling of the Subject, and not any concept of an Object’. His point was not that an experience of beauty arises without reference to objects; rather, a thing is judged to be beautiful ‘solely in respect of that quality in which it adapts itself to our mode of taking it in’. The case of the sublime is even more striking, for while we may ‘with perfect propriety’ call many objects in...

History

History   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,067 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of uneven development became the basis not only of the practice of writers such as Barbauld and Shelley but also of the most popular and widely imitated new form of historiographical practice in post-Waterloo literary culture, Walter *Scott 's Waverley novels. In these works, one can see how the dialectics of uneven development and the notion of a homogeneous empty time may be said to go hand in hand. That the logic of uneven development had indeed structured Scott's fiction from his first great experiment had been acknowledged in the final chapter of ...

Religion

Religion   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,549 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...isolation as a non-juror contributed to the intensity of his religious feeling and experience, but it is to be found as well in High Church circles within the Church of England. Such a background helped to form John *Wesley . Samuel Wesley , his father, was a High Church parson in remote Lincolnshire; Susanna Wesley , his mother, was the daughter of a prominent Dissenter. From this earnest and devout household, John and his brothers drew their determination to undertake the systematic practice of piety at Oxford, both in good works, such as *prison ...

Women Local and Family Historians

Women Local and Family Historians   Quick reference

Joan Thirsk

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,549 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...wrote vividly of its distinctive landscape, expressing her strong feeling of Cornwall being an ‘old country’; and in reporting her conversations with local people, she strove to uncover the distinctive qualities of Cornish folk. That same strategy has shown again powerfully in the 20th century in the work of Ella Pontefract, Marie Hartley, and Joan Ingilby, writing from the 1930s onwards, starting from visits to remote Swaledale before many visitors had found it (see Hilary Diaper (ed.), A Favoured Land: Yorkshire in Text and Image: The Work of Marie Hartley,...

Class

Class   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,846 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of trade unionists like the Tolpuddle Martyrs ( 1834 ) and Glasgow Cotton-Spinners ( 1836 ). The Chartist National Petition of 1837 asserted that ‘the Reform Act has effected a transfer of power from one domineering faction to another, and left the people as helpless as before. Our slavery has been exchanged for an apprenticeship to liberty, which has aggravated the painful feeling of our social degradation, by adding to it the sickening of still deferred hope.’ Some Chartists began to evict both the middle and upper class from the category of ‘the...

War

War   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,919 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...own defence—had focused feeling about national self-respect and the disappearance of that Scotland which had negotiated the Union as a free and equal party. The army recruited heavily in Scotland for both the Seven Years War and the American War, and turned immediately to this resource on the outbreak of war in 1793 . This was only the beginning of a massive military effort in which militia and volunteers gave Scots the satisfaction of providing for their own defence as well as offering their contribution to the defence of the southern kingdom. They could...

Romeo and Juliet

Romeo and Juliet   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Anthony Davies, and Will Sharpe

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
4,098 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...the closeness of the Capulet family a dominant motif, thereby challenging the youth-centred priorities of Zeffirelli’s. Forbidden by the series’ commitment to full texts to sacrifice long speeches in the interests of dramatic pace, this production compensates for the inadequacy of the young performers in its leads by its detailed and sensitive exploration of family relationships, projecting an unusual sympathy for the older generation (notably Michael Hordern ’s Capulet). As such it strives intelligently to use the medium to dramatize feeling rather than...

View: