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Stroke

Subject: Literature

A seven-poem sequence by Vincent Buckley Vincent Bukley, was first published in Quadrant (1965). The poem describes the familiar events associated with the death of a parent: the hospital ...

stroke

stroke   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
25 words

... A line forming part of a hand-rendered or printed character. The ratio of thickness of vertical to horizontal stroke s is known as ‘ stroke ...

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The Oxford Dictionary of Idioms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
92 words

... different strokes for different folks : see different . not ( or never ) do a stroke of work do no work at all. put someone off their stroke disconcert someone so that they do not work or perform as well as they might; break the pattern or rhythm of someone’s work. stroke of genius an outstandingly brilliant and original idea. stroke of luck ( or good luck ) a fortunate occurrence that could not have been predicted or expected. stroke someone ( or someone’s hair ) the wrong way irritate a...

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Food and Fitness: A Dictionary of Diet and Exercise (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... An interruption of the blood supply to the brain. A blood clot, a head injury, or a burst blood vessel in the brain (an aneurysm) can cause strokes. The main risk factors associated with strokes are high blood pressure, heart diseases, diabetes, smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity. A stroke results in a portion of the brain being deprived of oxygen often leading to some type of paralysis, but small strokes may occur without symptoms. Large strokes can result in severe paralysis or death. Regular exercise and a healthy, balanced diet lower blood...

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
85 words

... ( apoplexy ) Interruption of the flow of blood to the brain. It is caused by blockage or rupture of an artery and may produce a range of effects from mild impairment to death. Conditions that predispose to stroke include atherosclerosis and hypertension . Many major strokes are prevented by treatment of risk factors, including surgery and the use of anticoagulant drugs. Transient ischaemic attacks ( TIAs ), or ‘mini‐strokes’, which last less than 24 hours, are investigated to try to prevent the occurrence of a more damaging stroke...

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A Dictionary of Mechanical Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...stroke 1. ( stroke length ) (Unit m) The linear distance between top dead centre and bottom dead centre of a piston in a reciprocating engine or mechanism. 2. The movement of a piston or plunger in a reciprocating machine to execute a particular function; for example, the exhaust stroke of an engine in which the exhaust gas es are expelled from a...

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A Dictionary of English Manuscript Terminology 1450–2000

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, History
Length:
146 words

... In palaeography, a stroke is a line in the formation of a letter made by a single movement of the hand without change of direction. Thus, a scribe might write the letter l in a single stroke if it were a continuous loop back to the point of origin or in two strokes if he inscribed the vertical ascender and then doubled back upon himself. Various qualified types of stroke include headstroke, for, say, the cross-stroke (or cross-bar) on a T or t , and otiose stroke, for a superfluous flick of the pen trailing a letter, usually at the end of a word,...

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A Dictionary of Computer Science (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... A type of input to a graphics system consisting of a sequence of positions, possibly with other information. See also logical input device...

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The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Science and technology, Medicine and health
Length:
113 words

... ( apoplexy ; cerebrovascular accident ) An interruption in the blood supply to the brain. Causes include a blood clot, a head injury, or an aneurysm, but the primary cause is usually disease of the heart or blood vessels, with the effects on the head being secondary. A stroke results in a part of the brain being deprived of oxygen. Small strokes may occur without symptoms and go unnoticed by the victim, but the most common manifestation is some degree of paralysis; large strokes may be fatal. Regular aerobic exercise produces a number of benefits (e.g....

stroke

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Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
146 words

... ( apoplexy ) n. a sudden attack of weakness usually affecting one side of the body. It is the consequence of an interruption to the flow of blood to the brain. An ischaemic stroke occurs when the flow of blood is prevented by clotting ( see thrombosis ) or by a detached clot, either from the heart or a large vessel (such as the carotid artery), that lodges in an artery ( see embolism ). A haemorrhagic stroke results from rupture of an artery wall ( see cerebral haemorrhage ). Prolonged reduction of blood pressure may result in more diffuse...

stroke

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A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n . A blockage or (in about 20 per cent of cases) a haemorrhage of blood vessels in the brain, leading to a decreased supply of oxygenated blood to brain tissues normally perfused with blood by those vessels, lasting for more than 24 hours if the patient survives. The consequences depend on the site and extent of the stroke but often include paralysis (especially hemiplegia on the side of the body opposite the stroke), homonymous hemianopia , amnesia , aphasia , agraphia , convulsions , or coma . Also called cerebrovascular accident or CVA ....

Stroke

Stroke   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... The oarsman nearest the stern facing the coxswain , who sets the time of the stroke for the rest. His blade struck the water a full second before any other … Nor did he flag as the race wore on: as the others tired, he seemed to grow more fresh, until at length, as the boats begin to near the winning-post, his oar was dipping into the water nearly twice as often as any other. Stroke City A Northern Ireland nickname for the city of derry/londonderry , alluding to the stroke (‘/’) that separates the alternative names. The basic and historic name is Derry,...

stroke

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The Oxford Companion to the Body

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
1,447 words
Illustration(s):
1

... Apoplexy or stroke has been recognized at least since the beginning of Western medicine, in ancient Greece. Stroke arises from injury to the brain caused by interruption of the blood supply, rather like a heart attack: in fact stroke is now sometimes called a ‘brain attack’. Over 250 000 people suffer some type of stroke in the UK each year. Stroke now is the third leading cause of death and the most common cause of adult disability . The most typical manifestations include sudden weakness of the face, arm, or leg, and altered sensation or numbness, on...

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A Dictionary of Nursing (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
101 words

...stroke ( apoplexy ) [strohk] n. a sudden attack of weakness usually affecting one side of the body, resulting from an interruption to the flow of blood to the brain. The flow of blood may be prevented by thrombosis or embolism ( ischaemic s. ) or by haemorrhage ( haemorrhagic s. ). Prolonged reduction of blood pressure may result in more diffuse brain damage, as after a cardiorespiratory arrest. A stroke can vary in severity from a passing weakness or tingling in a limb ( see transient ischaemic attack ) to a profound paralysis, coma, and death. See...

‘Stroke’

‘Stroke’   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
126 words

...Stroke’ a seven-poem sequence by Vincent Buckley Vincent Bukley , was first published in Quadrant ( 1965 ). The poem describes the familiar events associated with the death of a parent: the hospital bedside, where the embarrassed visitors (‘voyeurs of decay’) engage in stiff, platitudinous conversation; the son's guilt over the lifetime lack of communication between himself and his father; and memories of the father in his prime compared with his present state. In the ‘life studies’ genre, which Buckley was one of the first Australian poets to employ, ‘Stroke...

stroke

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The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,318 words

...elsewhere—particularly in the heart. 1. Can strokes be avoided? 2. Assessment of neurological deficits 3. How much recovery will occur? 1. Can strokes be avoided? Much attention has been given in recent years to identifying ‘risk factors’, with a view to setting up programmes of stroke prevention. The major treatable factor is hypertension (high blood pressure). There is now clear evidence that the effective treatment of hypertension can reduce (although not eliminate) the risk of an acute stroke. This places considerable logistical demands on...

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A Dictionary of Dentistry (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Dentistry
Length:
185 words

... n. A cerebrovascular accident in which the blood supply to a part of the brain is suddenly interrupted by occlusion of a blood vessel ( ischaemia ), haemorrhage, or other causes. It can result in impaired vision, hearing, and speech because of the unilateral weakness or paralysis. There may also be difficulty in swallowing and clearing oral secretions, making the use of high-vacuum aspiration during operative dental procedures essential. Poor oral hygiene and reduced muscular activity can lead to an increased risk of caries and periodontal disease....

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A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... Also known as cerebrovascular accident ( CVA ); damage to brain tissue by hypoxia due to blockage of a blood vessel as a result of thrombosis, atherosclerosis, or haemorrhage. The severity and nature of the effects of the stroke depend on the region of the brain affected and the extent of damage. Hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia are major risk...

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A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...stroke A hemorrhage or thrombosis in a blood vessel in the brain, one of the most common causes of death in old people, formerly more common than now among the middle-aged, in whom it presented as a complication of undetected and untreated high blood pressure. ...

stroke velocity

stroke velocity   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... velocity The velocity of a swimmer in...

beginning stroke

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A Dictionary of Forensic Science

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Science and technology, Law
Length:
25 words

...stroke The initial stroke of a pen or other writing instrument, a characteristic that can be studied as part of questioned document ...

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