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stock character

A stereotyped character easily recognized by readers or audiences from recurrent appearances in literary or folk tradition, usually within a specific genre such as comedy or fairy tale. ...

stock character

stock character   Reference library

Marvin Carlson

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
489 words

... character A character of the same general type appearing in a number of different plays. Perhaps the best-known theatrical tradition relying heavily upon stock characters was the Italian commedia dell'arte , which offered not only traditional general types—the young lovers, the comic servants, the foolish old men—but much more specific stock characters that were also endlessly repeated: the flamboyant but cowardly Spanish captain, the foolish pedant, the elderly lover of the young wife. The comic tradition has continued through the centuries to make much...

stock character

stock character   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
306 words

... character A *character of the same general type appearing in a number of different plays. The Italian * commedia dell'arte offered traditional general types—the young lovers, the comic servants, the foolish old men—but also more specific stock characters that were also endlessly repeated: the flamboyant but cowardly Spanish captain, the foolish pedant, the elderly lover of the young wife. The comic tradition has continued through the centuries to make much use of this device, but stock characters have also been important in serious drama, every...

stock character

stock character   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... character A stereotyped character easily recognized by readers or audiences from recurrent appearances in literary or folk tradition, usually within a specific genre such as comedy or fairy tale. Common examples include the absent-minded professor, the country bumpkin, the damsel in distress, the old miser, the whore with a heart of gold, the bragging soldier, the villain of melodrama , the wicked stepmother, the jealous husband, and the soubrette . Similarly recognizable incidents or plot-elements which recur in fiction and drama are known as stock...

stock character

stock character noun   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
37 words
stock character

stock character  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A stereotyped character easily recognized by readers or audiences from recurrent appearances in literary or folk tradition, usually within a specific genre such as comedy or fairy tale. Common ...
stock characters

stock characters   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Media and Communication (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
56 words

... characters Conventional types rather than individuals, closely associated with established representational codes (typically those of a particular genre ). They are not necessarily stereotypes but are easily recognizable to audiences within a particular culture ( see also interpretive community ). See also anti-hero ; archetype ; hero or heroine ; motif ; sitcom . ...

Stock Characters

Stock Characters   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
591 words

... Characters are not to be confused with stereotyped characters. The latter are often pejorative renderings that elide individuality in order to present the character as a stand-in for a group denigrated by those with more social power, while stock characters form a repertory troupe of figures who have been repeatedly used in crime and mystery writing, because they serve functional purposes, most often related to creation of effect or to management of the narrative plot or of readers' expectations. When Edgar Allan Poe introduced a police official into “The...

Measure for Measure

Measure for Measure   Reference library

Sonia Massai and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,564 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...ruler in disguise’, and ‘the bed-trick’—only the first one derives from the play’s main sources, the fifth novella of the eighth decade in Cinthio ’s Hecatommithi ( 1565 ), its dramatic rendition Epitia ( 1573 ), and Whetstone ’s Promos and Cassandra ( 1578 ). The stock character of the ruler in disguise, which enjoyed sweeping popularity on the early Jacobean stage (see, for example, Middleton ’s The Phoenix , Marston ’s The Malcontent and The Fawn , and Sharpham’s The Fleer ), might derive from Elizabethan history plays, such as Heywood ’s ...

Novels

Novels   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,137 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...fiction: fairy-tale elements in the plots, for example, make Fanny Price a Cinderella as well as a study in regulated jealousy. The fictionality of her fictions, clearly signalled by references to the reader's expectations, the author's arbitrary will, and the stock phrases with which characters are released into their future lives, acknowledges the fragility of the happy endings to which her novels, as social comedies, conform. The traditions of the philosophical novel also continued. Mary Shelley's first novel, Frankenstein ( 1818 ), finds in the...

42 The History of the Book in Japan

42 The History of the Book in Japan   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
8,089 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
4

...striving to make their books more attractive and accessible to readers. One practice that soon became ubiquitous was the inclusion of small kana glosses alongside characters to indicate the pronunciation; this initially constituted a service to readers with a limited grasp of characters, but it later became a means for playful or ironic use of the glosses to subvert the sense of the characters. Similarly ubiquitous was the use of illustrations, which formed an indispensable part of all literary works; some authors produced their own illustrations, some made...

The Two Gentlemen of Verona

The Two Gentlemen of Verona   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,682 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...some attention, sporadic revivals in Stratford and London during the inter-war years still failed to establish the play in the British public’s imagination. In theatrical circles the play even acquired the derisive nickname ‘The Walking Gentlemen’ (‘walking gentleman’ is stock-company slang for a wholly undistinguished minor male role). The play was more popular with French and German audiences (Theodore Fontane, seeing Phelps’s revival, had clamoured for a Berlin production as early as 1857 ), enjoying a major production at the Odéon in 1902 , and...

20a The History of the Book in Britain, c.1475–1800

20a The History of the Book in Britain, c.1475–1800   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,011 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...including books of private prayers, *psalters , psalms, and almanacs. The ‘ *English Stock ’, as it became known, confirmed the prosperity of the Company, although the running of the scheme also had the effect of alienating many among the most junior ranks of the profession, who felt excluded from the profits generated by the staple works that formed the core of the English Stock. Efforts in the early decades of the 17 th century to create a Latin Stock and an Irish Stock proved unsuccessful. At the same time as the Stationers’ Company was consolidating its...

14 Printed Ephemera

14 Printed Ephemera   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
7,034 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...as such might have been thought unlikely to form part of the collecting interests of the book-centred library owner within the social elite. Ballads and chapbooks were published during the 17 th century under a monopoly grant by a group of publishers, partners in the *Ballad Stock , organized through the Stationers’ Company. However, because the grant did not prevent the intervention of others in this profitable and accessible area of the market, the ballad became the focus of long-running commercial struggles. The *broadside ballad was printed in *black...

Scottish Local and Family History

Scottish Local and Family History   Quick reference

David moody

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,622 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...existed before the end of the 18th century; and to find a domestic dwelling dating from earlier than 1800 is relatively rare. Much less than 1 per cent of Scotland's housing stock pre‐dates 1851 . There is a shortage, too, of artefacts to support an artisanal vision: 18th‐century inventories of ‘gear’ of even the middling classes such as tenant farmers show a meagre stock—a few shirts, blankets, a bolster, chopins and noggins, perhaps a candlestick, a few pots, and a smoothing iron, plus some linen and equipment for making butter and beer (at which...

Landscape History: The Countryside

Landscape History: The Countryside   Quick reference

H. S. A. Fox

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,175 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...earlier antecedents): this was the deliberate creation of ‘closed’ villages and the related spontaneous development of contrasted ‘open’ settlements. In closed villages landlords carefully controlled labour, destroyed surplus cottages, and renovated or reconstructed the building stock, as at Lockinge and Ardington, described in 1891 as a ‘delightful Berkshire colony’, though visibly steeped in deference and dependence. In open villages no landlord or group of farmers could control immigration or building standards. Such villages came to have the appearance...

All’s Well That Ends Well

All’s Well That Ends Well   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,814 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...himself by falsehood, and is dimissed to happiness.’ Coleridge , more sympathetic to Bertram’s plight, defended him by attacking Helen instead (‘it must be confessed that her character is not very delicate, and it required all Shakespeare’s consummate skill to interest us for her’, Table Talk , 1835 , although elsewhere he describes her as ‘Shakespeare’s loveliest character’), and for most of the next century discussions of the play continued to centre on whether its hero (hapless victim or bounder) or its heroine (virtuous exemplar of self-help or...

Publishing

Publishing   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,242 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the countryside selling trinkets, gifts, household goods, and toys. Even the most prosperous establishments stocked items other than books, for book-selling alone was rarely sufficient to make a decent living, and not all the commodities and services the bookseller offered were directly connected with the culture of print. The provincial bookseller—there are 988 listed in 316 towns in the Universal British Directory for the 1790s—carried a varied stock that typically included not only books but also stationery and patent medicines; the shop might even carry...

4 The History of the Book in Byzantium

4 The History of the Book in Byzantium   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
2,204 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...empire. The Byzantines called themselves Romans, but understood that they were custodians of the Greek literary heritage; in their formal writings they did their best to imitate the language and style of the Greek classics. One has to ask how far they succeeded in preserving the stock of Greek literature they inherited in late antiquity. It is fairly certain that already by this date a number of classical texts were no longer in circulation; the destruction of the library at the Serapeum in Alexandria in 391 will no doubt have led to further losses. Though...

11 The Technologies of Print

11 The Technologies of Print   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
10,192 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
8

...and novelist Samuel *Richardson , whose medium-size London printing office in Salisbury Square was also his dwelling, until the weight of the stock of type began to threaten the building’s structure, compelling him to move. The office’s equipment comprised one or more presses and a quantity of type. The type was held in open *type cases , subdivided in divisions each of which held multiple *sorts of one character. These smaller compartments of the case varied in size according to the frequency with which each letter, number, or mark of *punctuation was...

Design

Design   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,178 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...£17,500 (compared with £500 in 1756–7 and £7,700 in 1770 ). Rundells was involved in a number of subsidiary businesses including a diamond-cutting business in Spital-fields and a modern plate workshop, first in Greenwich and after 1807 in Soho, which supplied them with their stock and work on commission. But the largest manufacturers to exploit the neoclassical taste lay outside London, where production could be undertaken on an industrial scale [ see *consumerism, 19 ]. In the early 1760s Matthew *Boulton built his Soho factory at Handsworth,...

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