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stadial

A time when glaciers advanced and periglacial conditions extended, but not as significantly as in a glacial. Renssen et al. (2005) Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, maintain that ...

stadium

stadium n.   Quick reference

Concise Medical Dictionary (9 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
31 words

... n. ( pl. stadia ) a stage in the course of a disease; for example, the stadium invasionis is the period between exposure to infection and the onset of...

stadium

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A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
32 words

... ( pl . stadia ) 1. Large open space, often long and relatively narrow, with a rounded end, used for foot-racing in Classical Antiquity. 2. Modern sports arena or football stadium...

stadium

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Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
109 words

... . Although dictionaries traditionally gave priority to ✳stadia as the plural, stadiums is the more natural and now the more usual form. Stadiums has been the predominant form in English print sources since the mid-1980s—e.g.: • “Dozens of stadiums have sprouted up all over the country in recent years.” Lisa Respers , “Funds Sought for Stadium in Aberdeen,” Baltimore Sun , 28 Apr. 1997 , at B1. • “The other 25 percent of the money would go for ‘regional attractions’ like baseball and football stadiums in Pittsburgh.” Tom Barnes , “New Tax...

stadium

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A Dictionary of Nursing (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
30 words

...stadium [ stay -diŭm] n. ( pl. stadia ) a stage in the course of a disease. s. invasionis the period between exposure to infection and the onset of symptoms....

stadium

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
109 words

... [MC] An ancient Greek open‐air running track and sports ground, providing for spectators by raised earth banks. The stadium was shaped like a hairpin, one end curved and the other, the starting point, either open as at Athens and Delphi, or squared as at Olympia. In the Roman period, stone seating was normal. Occasionally, as at Nicopolis, a Roman stadium was rounded at both ends. The standard length was 600 feet which gave a straight course for the sprint race of about 200 yards. The two‐grooved starting line is seen at Corinth (in the agora ), Delphi,...

Stadium

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The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,769 words
Illustration(s):
1

...period. For example, in Rome the Stadium of Domitian—built in the Campus Martius in 92–96 ce and restored in the third century by Severus Alexander—was built for the display of Greek athletic contests. In Athens the well-known Panathenaic Stadium was constructed in 140–144 ce by Herodes Atticus , who also renovated the stadium at the Sanctuary of Apollo at Delphi. The Panathenaic Stadium was very lavish: constructed of Pentelic marble, it included seating for fifty thousand. At Aphrodisias, another marble Roman stadium built in the first century ce is...

Stadium

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The Grove Encyclopedia of Classical Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Classical studies
Length:
949 words

... ( 197–159 bc ). Stadia for Greek-style athletics contests continued to be built during the Roman Imperial period. For example the Stadium of Domitian in Rome was erected in ad 92–6 and restored in ad 228 by the Emperor Severus Alexander . The famous Panathenaic stadium at Athens was constructed between ad 140 and 144 by Herodes Atticus , who also renovated the stadium at Delphi . The Panathenaic stadium was especially lavish, being built of Pentelic marble and seating c. 50,000 spectators. In ad 391 the Christian Emperor...

stadium

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Richard Allan Tomlinson

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
313 words
Illustration(s):
1

...vaulted substructures (the stadium of the Roman period at Perge, S. Turkey) they served as natural catchment areas for rainwater, and required drainage. This often takes the form of a channel at the edge of the running track, perhaps punctuated with water basins at intervals. These probably facilitated cleaning of the channels rather than the provision of water for either spectators or athletes. See athletics ; sanctuaries . Richard Allan Tomlinson stadium Air view of the Piazza Navona, Rome, with the outline of the stadium of Domitian , who founded the...

stadium

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Richard Allan Tomlinson

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
321 words

... (Greek στάδιον) , running track, about 200 m. long (the term also signifies a comparable unit of linear measurement i.e. a ‘stade’; see measures ). Athletic activity often antedates the surviving stadia (e.g. at Nemea ); presumably any area of flat ground was used. One of the earliest definable stadia, that in the sanctuary of Poseidon at Isthmia , consists simply of a starting gate on the relatively level ground of the sanctuary, with a bank raised artificially to one side for spectators. The architectural development of stadia can be seen by the...

stadium

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The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
190 words

... (Gk. stadion ), running track, about 200 m. long (the term also signifies a comparable unit of linear measurement (i.e. a ‘stade’; see measures ). Athletic activity often antedates the surviving stadia (e.g. at Nemea ); presumably any area of flat ground was used. One of the earliest definable stadia, that in the sanctuary of Poseidon at Isthmia , consists simply of a starting‐gate on the relatively level ground of the sanctuary, with a bank raised artificially to one side for spectators. The architectural development of stadia can be seen by the...

Stadium

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Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... This word comes, via Latin, from Greek stadion , an altered form of spadion , ‘racecourse’, from span , ‘to pull’, referring to the drawing of chariots, while at the same time influenced by stadios , ‘steady’. The stade (Greek stadion ) was also a measure of length, 600 Greek feet, the equivalent of about 607 English feet (185m). The Olympic stadium had terraced seats along its length and the length of the course was traditionally said to have been fixed by hercules...

Wembley stadium

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A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
90 words

...stadium The Great Stadium at Wembley Park, London, was built to coincide with the British Empire Exhibition of 1923 . Work was completed just four days before hosting its first Football Association Cup Final on 29 April 1923 . The Rugby League Cup Final was played at Wembley every year between 1929 and 2000 (except 1932 ). The greatest moments in its history were the hosting of the 1948 Olympic Games and the 1966 World Cup. The stadium was completely rebuilt from 2000 and opened in 2007 to hold 90,000...

Wembley stadium

Wembley stadium   Reference library

Richard A. Smith

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
115 words

...stadium . The Great Stadium at Wembley Park, London, was built to coincide with the British Empire Exhibition of 1923 . Work was completed just four days before hosting its first Football Association Cup Final on 29 April 1923 . It has since been a venue for a multitude of sports, including boxing, hurling, speedway, greyhound meetings, horse shows, and show jumping events. The Rugby League Cup Final has been played at Wembley every year since 1929 (except 1932 ). The greatest moments in its history were the hosting of the 1948 Olympic Games and...

Twickenham stadium

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A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
45 words

...stadium ( Middx .). The headquarters of the Rugby Football Union. The site was purchased by William Williams in 1907 , laid out with stands and provided with a car park. It has since been added to and has a capacity of more than...

Twickenham stadium

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J. A. Cannon

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
47 words

...stadium (Middx.) . The headquarters of the Rugby Football Union. The site was purchased by William Williams in 1907 , laid out with stands and provided with a car park. It has since been added to and has a capacity of more than 60,000. J. A....

Stadium Food

Stadium Food   Reference library

Dan Macey

Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover’s Companion to New York City

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Society and culture, Cookery, Food, and Drink
Length:
1,338 words

...food to Yankee Stadium, Madison Square Garden, Meadowlands Sports Complex, and Shea Stadium, was sold to food service giant Aramark in 1994 . Legends Hospitality Management, a firm owned by the New York Yankees, the Dallas Cowboys, and the private equity firms Goldman Sachs and Dallas-based CIC Partners, bought the Yankees’ concession business in 1998 . Legends, which has operated concessions at both minor and major league stadiums, including Angels Stadium in Anaheim, California, had $53 million in concession sales in 2013 at Yankee Stadium, making food...

stadium paradox

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Mathematics (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... paradox One of Zeno’s paradoxes which relate to the issue of whether time and space are made up of minute indivisible parts. It considers two rows of objects of equal size—of the smallest possible size—moving with equal velocity in opposite directions, with a speed equal to the smallest unit of length per smallest unit of time. The argument at the centre of the paradox is that relative to one another, they move at one unit of space in half of the unit of time, contradicting the proposition that there is a smallest unit of...

Heysel Stadium disaster

Heysel Stadium disaster   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Sports Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Society and culture
Length:
98 words

...Stadium disaster A crowd disaster at Belgium's Heysel Stadium in Brussels on 29 May 1985 when 39 fans of the Italian football club Juventus died before the final of the European (Club Champions) Cup against English club Liverpool. A retaining wall collapsed on the terraces—widely believed to have been caused by the aggressive behaviour of some Liverpool supporters—and people were crushed or trampled to death in the aftermath. Controversially, the match went on to be played, the television schedules taking priority. English clubs were banned from European...

stadium or moving rows paradox

stadium or moving rows paradox   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Philosophy (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
167 words

... or moving rows paradox . The most mysterious of Zeno of Elea 's paradoxes of motion. The rows are like trains of coaches; the train of A -coaches is stationary, those of B -coaches and C -coaches are moving past it at equal speeds in opposite directions. Zeno seems to infer that a B takes as long, and also half as long, to pass a moving C as to pass a stationary A ; hence that a time is equal to its half. One suggestion is that he is attacking the idea of a minimum time-stretch: a B 's A -passing time is supposed for argument's sake to be such...

stadium

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The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... . Although several dictionaries seem to prefer stadia as the plural, stadiums is the more natural and the more usual form. Stadiums is also 30 times more common—e.g.: “[D]ozens of stadiums have sprouted up all over the country in recent years” ( Baltimore Sun ). See plurals ( B )...

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