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Overview

speed of sound

Symbol c or c s. The speed at which sound waves are propagated through a material medium. In air at 20°C sound travels at 344 m s−1, in water at 20°C it travels at 1461 m s−1, ...

speed of sound

speed of sound   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... of sound the speed at which sound travels in a given medium under specified conditions. The speed of sound at sea level in the International Standard Atmosphere is 1,108 feet per second (or 658 knots, or 1,215 kilometers per...

speed of sound

speed of sound   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Physics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Physics
Length:
217 words

...speed of sound Symbol c or c s . The speed at which sound waves are propagated through a material medium. In air at 20°C sound travels at 344 m s −1 , in water at 20°C it travels at 1461 m s −1 , and in steel at 20°C at 5000 m s −1 . The speed of sound in a medium depends on the medium’s modulus of elasticity ( E ) and its density ( ρ ‎) according to the relationship c =√( E / ρ ‎). For longitudinal waves in a narrow solid specimen, E is the Young modulus; for a liquid E is the bulk modulus ( see elastic modulus ); and for a gas E = γ ‎ p ,...

speed of sound

speed of sound   Reference library

The New Oxford Dictionary for Scientific Writers and Editors (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

... of sound Symbol: c or c a A physical quantity, the speed of propagation of sound waves in a medium. The *SI unit is the metre per second. The value in dry air at 0 °C is 331.4 m s −1...

speed of sound

speed of sound  

Symbol c or cs. The speed at which sound waves are propagated through a material medium. In air at 20°C sound travels at 344 m s−1, in water at 20°C it travels at 1461 m s−1, and in steel at 20°C at ...
The Two Gentlemen of Verona

The Two Gentlemen of Verona   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,682 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...compelled to agree to this course of action. 2.1 In Milan, Valentine has fallen in love with Silvia. She has commissioned Valentine to write a letter for her to ‘one she loves’, and when she inspects what he has written he cannot understand what she means by telling him to keep it; Speed has to explain that Valentine is himself the object of her love. 2.2 Exchanging rings with vows of mutual fidelity, Proteus and Julia part. 2.3 Proteus’ servant Lance and his dog Crab are also off to Milan: deploring the dry-eyed callousness of his dog, Lance comically re-enacts...

Welsh Local and Family History

Welsh Local and Family History   Quick reference

D. Huw Owen

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,425 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and in the topography of Wales. The second volume of John Speed 's Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine ( 1611 ), featuring Wales, was influenced by the writings of Llwyd and Saxton's maps, but Speed himself was responsible for the town plans which accompanied the county maps, and the sixteen town views which accompanied his map of Wales: one for each of the four episcopal centres and the main town in twelve shires. The members of the North Wales gentry who provided John Speed with additional information for a revised version of the Theatre probably...

19 The Electronic Book

19 The Electronic Book   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
5,019 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...aware of it. From the mid- 1990s publishers understood the power of exploiting this technology themselves, which had a significant impact on the cost and speed of book production and resulted in the nearly fourfold growth in the number of US titles produced annually between 1994 (52,000) and 2004 (195,000). The files used to produce books could be read on a computer screen, but paper was still the medium of presentation. Electronic files alone were not enough to initiate a revolution in reading. Many factors had to be in place before the era of e-books...

Psychology

Psychology   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,151 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...says Stewart, would apply with equal force to the sciences of matter. A person unfamiliar with *Newton 's third law of motion applies it when he pushes his canoe away from the shore with a pole, or when using a slingshot he makes use of the notion of centrifugal forces. Even a horse circling the ring under the direction of a lunging-rein adapts the obliquity of its body with ‘mathematical accuracy’ to the rate of its speed. Despite all our familiarity with the practical applications of physical and chemical laws, it is still a valuable discovery when...

17 Bookbinding

17 Bookbinding   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
5,252 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
9

...books sound and well made, without missing leaves—and wealthy owners did not necessarily have fancy bindings. Early bookbinding practice is not well documented; contemporary manuals or archival sources on binders and their lives are relatively scarce before the 19 th century. The bindings themselves constitute the largest body of evidence for exploring bookbinding history. The serious study of the subject began in the late 19 th century, initially with a focus on the artistic qualities of fine bindings, maturing into a tradition of comparative study of...

Romeo and Juliet

Romeo and Juliet   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Anthony Davies, and Will Sharpe

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
4,098 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...successful of all films based on Shakespeare, is both disturbing and clever in juxtaposing the controlled manipulation of the world as the mass media deliver it with the confused but essentially sacrificial love of the teenage Romeo (Leonardo DiCaprio) and Juliet (Claire Danes). The film presents, with the speed and energy of MTV, images which reflect a postmodern American society and environment choked with the obsolescent and the discarded, including a good deal of religious kitsch. Encapsulating the dislocated action within the ephemerality of television...

Casualisms

Casualisms   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
961 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the proliferation of casualisms in modern prose? There seem to be two main causes. First, casualisms reflect the ever-greater sense of speed in modern society. Clipped speech is faster speech. Second, manners have long been moving away from stiff formality, as the Evanses noted: Forty years ago it was considered courteous to use formal English in speaking to strangers, implying that they were solemn and important people. Today it is considered more flattering to address strangers as if they were one's intimate friends. This is a polite lie, of course; but it is...

Headlinese

Headlinese   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
1,623 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Canada Financial Aid> <Okinawa Case Pressed in Court> . In text, a writer would be better off using the adjectival forms Canadian and Okinawan . See functional shift . C. Peculiar Grammar of. Another effect of space constraints in headlines is the adoption of punctuation and syntax constructions that are not found in general prose. They would sound strange indeed in conversation. Commas and semicolons serve unique purposes in headlines, largely because periods usually appear only in abbreviations. Commas routinely stand in for the conjunction and ...

Split Infinitives

Split Infinitives   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
1,692 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...all parents to make sure their children are protected by either car seats or seat belts .) See parallelism . C. Justified Splits. A number of infinitives are best split. Perhaps the most famous is from the 1960s television series Star Trek , in which the opening voice-over included this phrase: to boldly go where no man (or, in the revival of the 1980s and 1990s, where no one ) has gone before . The phrase sounds inevitable partly because it is so familiar, but also because the adverb most naturally bears the emphasis, not the verb go . And that...

Punctuation

Punctuation   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
7,703 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...is the cuing system by which writers signal their readers to slow down, pause, speed up, supply tonal inflections, and otherwise move more smoothly through sentences. Punctuation is an aspect of rhetoric: a way of giving emphasis and rhythm and achieving clarity. Meanwhile, punctuation problems are often a prime indicator of poor writing: “Most errors of punctuation arise from ill-designed, badly shaped sentences, and from the attempt to make them work by means of violent tricks with commas and colons.” Hugh Sykes Davies , Grammar Without Tears 167...

sound speed

sound speed  

The rate at which sound energy moves through a medium. In sea water this is between 1400 and 1550 m/s. In sea water, the speed of sound is a function of temperature, salinity, and pressure due to ...
sound barrier

sound barrier  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Name for the technical difficulties in accelerating an aircraft to a speed faster than that of sound. When an aircraft approaches the speed of sound, various problematic aerodynamic factors come ...
Mach

Mach  

A measurement of speed relative to the speed of sound. 1 Mach is the speed of sound, which varies from about 1225 kilometres per hour (km h-1) in warm air at sea level to about 1060 kilometres per ...
hypervelocity impact

hypervelocity impact  

The impact of an object into a target at a speed that greatly exceeds the speed of sound in the struck body. Typically, in solids, this limit occurs at around 4 km/s. At these speeds solid rock ...
sonic

sonic  

Adj. of or pertaining to sound or the speed of sound.
magnetostrictive tablet

magnetostrictive tablet  

A type of data tablet that consists of an array of wires that will propagate strain waves at the speed of sound. As the device can be controlled by signals moving at the speed of light, the ...

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