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sovereignty

Subject: Law

N. Supreme authority in a state. In any state sovereignty is vested in the institution, person, or body having the ultimate authority to impose law on everyone else in the state ...

sovereignty

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The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... 'säv(ǝ)rǝntē n. pl. -ies 1 supreme power or authority. 2 the authority of a state to govern itself or another state: national sovereignty. 3 a self-governing...

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A Dictionary of Philosophy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
44 words

... Final authority, that is itself subject to no further authority. Philosophical questions include asking whether such an authority is necessary in an orderly political state, or whether systems of ‘checks and balances’ can provide stable government with no one body claiming absolute sovereignty...

sovereignty

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Barry Buzan

A Concise Oxford Dictionary of Politics and International Relations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
243 words

... Sovereignty is the claim to be the ultimate political authority, subject to no higher power as regards the making and enforcing of political decisions. In the international system, sovereignty is the claim by the state to full self‐government, and the mutual recognition of claims to sovereignty is the basis of international society. Sovereignty is the other side of the coin of international anarchy, for if states claim sovereignty, then the structure of the international system is by definition anarchic. Sovereignty should not be confused with freedom...

sovereignty

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A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... The exercise by a state of absolute power over its territory, system of government, and...

sovereignty

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
71 words

... Ultimate authority, held by a person or institution, against which there is no appeal. In early modern Europe, sovereignty came to be ascribed to the absolute monarchs of the new nation‐states. In Britain, sovereignty resides in Parliament. In most countries, it now resides in ‘the people’. Since 1945 states agreed to pool sovereignty in certain intergovernmental organizations, such as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization ( NATO ) and the European Union ( EU...

sovereignty

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A Dictionary of Geography (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2023

... Conventionally, political authority exercised by a state over a given territory. Domestic sovereignty includes both authority and control but only within a state, while international legal sovereignty concerns the authority (government) of the state as recognized by other sovereign states. This legal personality can survive territorial and internal changes. Westphalian sovereignty implies the territorial organization of the state as an inviolate realm, free from intervention by other states, while interdependent sovereignty relates wholly to...

sovereignty

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Encyclopaedic Dictionary of International Law (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, International Law
Length:
478 words

... ‘Sovereignty as a principle of international law must be sharply distinguished from other related uses of the term: sovereignty in its internal aspects and political sovereignty. Sovereignty in its internal aspects is concerned with the identity of the bearer of supreme authority within a State. This may be an individual or a collective unit…. In international relations, the scope of political sovereignty is still less limited [than that within a State]. Political sovereignty is the necessary concomitant of the lack of an effective international order...

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A Dictionary of Law (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Law
Length:
219 words

... n. Supreme authority in a state. In any state sovereignty is vested in the institution, person, or body having the ultimate authority to impose law on everyone else in the state and the power to alter any pre-existing law. How and by whom the authority is exercised varies according to the political nature of the state. In many countries the executive, legislative, and judicial powers of sovereignty are exercised by different bodies. One of these bodies may in fact retain sovereignty by having ultimate control over the others. But in some countries,...

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Garner's Modern English Usage (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
51 words

... ; ⋆sovranty . The first is the standard spelling. The second is an experimental shortening habitually used by the poet John Milton ( 1608–1674 ) and later adopted by some British writers in the 1800s and 1900s—but it didn’t catch on. Current ratio in print ( sovereignty vs. ⋆ sovranty ): 3,014:1 ...

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A Dictionary of Critical Theory (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... A form of authority . Its principal characteristic is that it is the supreme or final authority, meaning that there is no other form of authority surpassing it. Sovereignty has taken a number of different forms throughout history, ranging from the tribal chief to feudal king and democratically elected president. The key political and theoretical problem it raises is the question of legitimacy: sovereignty is never purely intrinsic, or naturally occurring, it must be embedded in a social structure that serves as its condition of possibility. For...

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A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
862 words

...sovereignty can be understood as a social construction. The issue is not what sovereignty is, but how discourses and practices of sovereignty generate the effects of state power. Geographers have approached sovereignty principally through its relations with states and territory . In its ideal form as supreme authority, state sovereignty necessitates the systematic demarcation of land, sea, and air. No two entities can be sovereign over the same space, requiring the delineation of agreed boundaries ( see border ). But as an effective quality, sovereignty...

Sovereignty

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Jessie Moritz

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Politics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Politics
Length:
1,681 words

...has called for the re-creation of the sovereignty over the Islamic ummah under a khilāfat . Importantly, proponents of Jihād-i sovereignty believe that tawḥīd provides a clear and single direction and demands a unified spirit from the ummah . Jihād-i sovereignty is thus far more inflexible than the understanding of sovereignty promulgated by Ijtihād-i Islamists. Ijtihād-i sovereignty is a liberal interpretation of Islamic sovereignty. Ijtihād-i proponents strive to adapt Islamic sovereignty to the modern world. They maintain that Islam does...

Sovereignty

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Jack Donnelly

The Oxford Companion to International Relations

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
3,661 words

...and sovereign. Their sovereignty is not “merely formal” but, like all sovereignty, essentially formal. Possessing the capabilities to exercise effective control adds something else to, rather than perfects, sovereignty. Conversely, rule by force without right is not imperfect sovereignty but domination, a different type of (nonsovereign) rule. Sovereignty, in the legal-political sense, is a matter of jurisdiction, in the literal sense of the right to state (dictate) the law. Those who exercise supreme jurisdiction exercise sovereignty and can be said to be...

sovereignty

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Dictionary of the Social Sciences

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
418 words

... Final and absolute authority within a political community—originally ascribed to the king, and now more generally to the state or to the citizens ( popular sovereignty ). Although Roman law developed a concept of the sovereign power of the emperor, modern Western reflections on sovereignty emerged only as the religious structure of worldly authority began to crumble during the Renaissance. The first modern account of sovereignty is usually credited to the sixteenth-century French political philosopher Jean Bodin , who argued that all political...

Sovereignty

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The Oxford Companion to American Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Law
Length:
1,884 words

...and Hugo Grotius were instrumental not only in codifying sovereignty, but also in codifying it primarily in terms of nation-states. As a result, although the concept of sovereignty does not require a nation-state, today we inevitably link the two. Bodin described sovereignty as viewed from inside the political system, whereas Grotius described it as viewed from outside the political system. From the inside, sovereignty is experienced as a limited supreme power, whereas from the outside sovereignty is experienced primarily in terms of supreme power limited...

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The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
481 words

... , the ultimate locus of power and fount of authority in society, is a vexed issue in Irish history. High kings had developed a loose and contested monarchy in Ireland but, after Henry II 's assertion of lordship in 1171 , the sovereignty of Ireland rested outside the island as an inalienable attribute of the English crown. This was qualified in two ways. First the papacy , which claimed sovereignty over islands, had granted the lordship of Ireland to the English king to reform its religion under Pope Adrian's bull Laudabiliter of 1156 . In ...

sovereignty

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Saladin Meckled-Garcia

The Oxford Companion to Philosophy (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
223 words

... . The right, by a governing power, held against other powers, to rule a designated territory, people, and their resources—a jurisdiction—and defend these from incursion. It requires, first, criteria for according the right, and secondly, correlative duties on the part of other states. Until the Treaty of Westphalia ( 1648 ), after the Thirty Years War, the accepted sources of the right were principally religious. Post-Westphalia a secular basis for the right became established, granting sovereignty to de facto independent political entities. The...

Sovereignty

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Oxford Companion to Australian Politics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
1,199 words

... Sovereignty is a core concept for defining the nation state in domestic politics and international relations . Domestic sovereignty refers to the ultimate source or origin of political power within the state that is usually assumed to be single and indivisible. In international politics nation states are credited with being the primary actors whose national sovereignty is recognised by international law and supposed to be respected by other nation states. Sovereignty has always been a highly contested concept because of its absolutist origins and...

Sovereignty

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Richard Falk

The Oxford Companion to Comparative Politics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
2,317 words

...For Locke, the locus of sovereignty was suspended somewhere between the state and society, a constitutionalist nexus that has become associated with the inner nature of legitimate government at the level of the sovereign state. So conceived, sovereignty is compatible with citizen rights and the accountability of government and officialdom, including the head of state. Indeed, some formulations of sovereignty, tracing their lineage to Rousseau—especially those imbued with democratic ideology—go much further. They locate sovereignty in civil society or in the...

Sovereignty

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The Oxford Companion to Politics of the World (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
2,290 words

...For Locke the locus of sovereignty was suspended somewhere between the state and society, a constitutionalist nexus that has become associated with the inner nature of legitimate government at the level of the sovereign state. So conceived, sovereignty is compatible with citizen rights and the accountability of government and officialdom, including the head of state. Indeed, some formulations of sovereignty, tracing their lineage to Rousseau, especially those imbued with democratic ideology, go much further. They locate sovereignty in civil society or in the...

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