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Overview

society

A group of individuals, all of the same species, in which there is some degree of co-operation, communication, and division of labour.

Society

Society   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... In the restricted sense, the world of fashion, high society or the upper ten . Society of Friends See quakers . Society of Jesus See jesuits . Society of the Temple, The See under temple . Society verse See vers de société . Affluent society, The See under affluent . Café society See under café . Camden Society See under camden . Dorcas Society See under dorcas . Fabian Society See under fabius . Flat Earth Society See under flat . Friendly society See under friend . High society See under high . John Birch Society See under ...

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A Dictionary of Sociology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
404 words

...society’, ‘capitalist society’, and of ‘society’ being responsible for some observed social phenomenon. On reflection, however, such a usage clearly has its problems: for example, is British society a clear unity, or can we also talk of Welsh , Scottish , and Northern Irish societies? And, even within England, are there not wide cultural differences between (say) north and south? Is there one capitalist society—or many? Nor is a society the same thing as a nation-state. The former Yugoslavia clearly contained several societies: Croat, Slovenian, Serbian, and...

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The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
43 words

... A group of persons unified by a distinctive and systematic set of normative relations, whereby actions of one are perceived as meriting characteristic responses by others. To be part of the same society is to be subject to these norms of...

society

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The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... A group of people connected to one another by shared customs, institutions, culture, and, to a lesser extent,...

society

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A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
345 words

...). Among human geographers, society has three main senses. The first treats society as something left over when economy, polity, and culture are removed, i.e. it is a residual term. The second, shared by anthropology and history, refers to generic types of human association, e.g. hunter-gatherer societies, pre-industrial societies, or slave-owning societies. In current social theory, examples include knowledge society and network society . The third equates society with nation and/or state, as in the phrase, Canadian society. In so doing, a supposedly...

society

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A Dictionary of Zoology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
25 words

... A group of individuals, all of the same species, in which there is some degree of co-operation , communication , and division of labour....

society

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Lincoln Allison

A Concise Oxford Dictionary of Politics and International Relations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
303 words

... The English word ‘society’ can be stretched or narrowed to cover almost any form of association of persons possessing any degree of common interests, values, or goals. ‘Society’ in the nineteenth century meant the upper classes; one might now refer to ‘international academic society’ or ‘European society’, though these uses might be disputed. The primary and most normal sense refers to a society defined by the boundaries of the state, even though this usage is odd and potentially misleading in the many cases where there is more than one sizeable ethnic or...

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A Dictionary of Critical Theory

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

... An abstract term for the complex set of beliefs, practices , rules, and traditions groups of people adhere to. Society is always greater than a single individual, and as such it is often defined in the negative as the opposite of the individual, or as that which constrains the individual and prevents him or her from living out their desires . But it is also used in more affirmative terms to classify the ensemble of institutions, organizations, and relationships that give support to the individual. It is often contrasted with culture , with the...

society

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A Dictionary of Critical Theory (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... An abstract term for the complex set of beliefs, practices , rules, and traditions groups of people adhere to. Society is always greater than a single individual, and as such it is often defined in the negative as the opposite of the individual, or as that which constrains the individual and prevents him or her from living out their desires . But it is also used in more affirmative terms to classify the ensemble of institutions, organizations, and relationships that give support to the individual. It is often contrasted with culture , with the...

society

society   Reference library

Dictionary of the Social Sciences

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
723 words

...the mid-nineteenth century. Comte and Spencer insisted that society was not the sum of individuals but a distinctive entity that transcended the individual members. This conception of society was developed systematically by Emile Durkheim , who emphasized society's objective existence external to individuals and frequently constraining on them. Society, as such, came to be seen as an entity in its own right, independent of the actions of the individuals that composed it. This tension between society and the individual has been a central methodological and...

society

society   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to George Eliot

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,845 words

...network of society, in which both individuals and classes are enmeshed, is the product of a long process of evolution, and, as she puts it in her early essay on ‘The *Natural History of German Life ’, ‘what has grown up historically can only die out historically, by the gradual operation of necessary laws’. The sense of society as ‘incarnate history’ ( Essays , 287), as a constantly evolving organism of interdependent parts which act on one another in subtle and unexpected ways, is succinctly captured in the description of old provincial society in ...

society

society   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Philosophy (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
178 words

... . A set of individuals and/or institutions in relations governed by practical interdependence, convention, and perhaps law—which relations may vary from the local to the international. The modern concept emerged in later eighteenth-century Europe (in arguments against absolutism and civic republicanism) to denote a supposed sphere of causal and moral self-sufficiency lying between the political and the personal. The concept was the ground for the new ‘science’ of ‘sociology’. It later came to be used more loosely to include the political and the personal....

Society

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Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
897 words

...not only toward the rich society and the powerful society, but upward to the Great Society. Lyndon Baines Johnson 1908 – 73 American Democratic statesman , 36th President 1963–9 speech at University of Michigan, 22 May 1964 great Society Great society If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich. John F. Kennedy 1917 – 63 American Democratic statesman , 35th President 1961–3 inaugural address, 20 January 1961 help the many who are poor save the few who are rich Society is based on the assumption...

society

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A Dictionary of Cultural Anthropology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Social sciences, Anthropology
Length:
120 words

...society 1. a general characteristic of being human, which is that as a species we spend our lives in organized social groups; or, 2. a specific group of people who share a common existence. The concept’s centrality to British and European social anthropologies historically marked a divide with American cultural anthropology , although the distinctions are less pronounced today. ‘Society’ and its presumed opposites have long framed anthropological inquiry and debates, among them individual vs. society; nature vs. society; and civilized vs....

society

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A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... A group of individuals, all of the same species , in which there is some degree of co-operation , communication , and division of...

society

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A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... A broad grouping of people (including a community or nation) that shares common traditions, institutions, collective activities, and...

SOCIETY

SOCIETY   Reference library

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Philosophy, Literature, Literary reference works
Length:
232 words

... “Society” is borrowed from the Latin societas (association, meeting, community, society), which can designate participation in a commercial enterprise as well as an alliance or political union: a socius is a partner and, no doubt, according to the etymology, a comrade in war. Latin societas was used to render the Greek koinônia [ ϰοινωνία ‎], from koinos [ ϰοινός ‎] (common, public); on the relation between “community” and “society,” see POLIS , COMMUNITY , II . The term “society” acquired precise meaning rather late, through a series of...

AIDS and society

AIDS and society   Reference library

Science, Technology, and Society

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...responses by communities, societies, and the state, the history of the epidemic reveals a fourth critical domain in which society matters. As Mann and Tarantola put it, “the lesson of the modern pandemic is that certain features of society are fundamental determinants of the epidemic's natural history” (p. 4). Whereas the HIV/AIDS epidemic spreads from one individual to another by way of specific behavioral and social practices, a growing body of evidence makes clear that the broad social and structural characteristics of a society facilitate or discourage the...

genetics and society

genetics and society   Reference library

Science, Technology, and Society

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...and society . On July 3 , 2000 , Time magazine asserted that “history books will mark this week as the ceremonial start of the genomic era.” The remark is typical of how many journalists, scientists, business leaders, and politicians describe the significance of genetic research and genetic technology. That is, genetics is said to bring about changes that are so profound and so far-reaching as to amount to the beginning of a new era, no less world-altering than the beginning of the industrial era in the late eighteenth century. Such claims are not...

robots and society

robots and society   Reference library

Science, Technology, and Society

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...and society . Robotics historically derives from two very different origins. Designers of early mechanical automata sought to amaze viewers with sophisticated machines that displayed lifelike physical behaviors. The second origin is the community of science fiction authors who sparked the public imagination with androids endowed with superhuman qualities that, as often as not, possessed the capability to do great harm or good to human society. Commercial and research robotics did not initially realize these early explorations in social robotics, but rather...

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