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sic transit gloria mundi

Thus passes the glory of the world; a Latin sentence spoken during the coronation of a new Pope, while flax is burned to represent the transitoriness of earthly glory. It was first used at ...

sic transit gloria mundi

sic transit gloria mundi   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

... transit gloria mundi thus passes the glory of the world; a Latin sentence spoken during the coronation of a new Pope, while flax is burned to represent the transitoriness of earthly glory. It was first used at the coronation of Alexander V in Pisa, 7 July 1409 , but is earlier in origin; it may ultimately derive from ‘ O quam cito transit gloria mundi [Oh how quickly the glory of the world passes away]’ in the De Imitatione Christi of Thomas à Kempis...

sic transit gloria mundi

sic transit gloria mundi  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Thus passes the glory of the world; a Latin sentence spoken during the coronation of a new Pope, while flax is burned to represent the transitoriness of earthly glory. It was first used at the ...
Latinism

Latinism   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...Latinism . A latin word or other element in another language: for example, in English the word stimulus , the phrase non sequitur , the sentence Sic transit gloria mundi , and the derivative illegality (from illegalis ). ...

hat, the red

hat, the red   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Christian Art and Architecture (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
83 words

...the cardinalate. It was a very broad-brimmed, flat-topped hat with fifteen tassels on either side. It was never actually worn after the cardinal was invested with it, and after his death it was hung over his grave until it perished, when it was swept up and thrown away— sic transit gloria mundi . Archbishops often use a version, green and with fewer tassels, on their letter-heads, but do not actually have them. Neither kind is now...

Sic

Sic   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... (Latin, ‘thus’, ‘so’) A word used in quoting after a doubtful or unusual word or phrase, or a misspelling, to indicate that it is here printed exactly as in the original and to call attention to the fact that it is wrong in some way or different from what is to be expected. Sic transit gloria mundi (Latin, ‘So passes away the glory of the world’) A quotation from De Imitatione Christi by Thomas à Kempis ( 1380–1471 ), a classic statement on the transitory nature of human vanities. At the coronation ceremony of the pope, a reed surmounted with flax is...

Flambeau

Flambeau   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
140 words

...at Easter and Christmas. The pope 's role was active. The symbolism was eschatological (end of the world). Around 1260 ( Stephen of Bourbon ), we learn that an acolyte lit and extinguished the flambeau in front of the pope before he was crowned, and said to him: “ Sic transit gloria mundi ”. Here the role of the pope was passive, and the ceremony symbolized the transitory character of his power. Systematically attested from 1404 , this rite remained in force until the early 20th century. A. Paravicini Bagliani , Le Corps du pape , Paris, 1997. Agostino...

Latinisms

Latinisms   Reference library

Garner's Modern English Usage (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
184 words

...especially in scholarly contexts ( e.g. , i.e. , ibid. , id. ); (3) those used in jargon of doctors, lawyers, and scientists ( metatarsus , habeas corpus , chlorella ); (4) the mottoes and maxims used especially in ceremonial contexts ( E pluribus unum , Sic transit gloria mundi ); (5) those that literate people know and occasionally find useful ( ipse dixit , non sequitur , rebus , mutatis mutandis ); and (6) the truly rare ones that characterize sesquipedality ( ceteris paribus , hic et ubique , ignoratio elenchi ). Increasingly, the...

Proverbs

Proverbs   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,280 words

...or the Latin sayings Memento mori , “Remember (that you must) die,” or Caveat emptor , “Let the buyer beware.” Other proverbs express a truism that one is expected to recognize and to apply appropriately, such as Metron ariston , “Moderation is the best thing,” or Sic transit gloria mundi , “So passes the glory of the world.” Many proverbs use metaphorical language that must be decoded. For example, animals are often used metaphorically for human types: Aquila non captat muscas , “An eagle does not catch flies,” or Asinus asinum fricat , “One donkey...

Ruins

Ruins   Reference library

Karen Lang

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
3,844 words

...sense of time and history. Still, the sense of ruins did not shift entirely. Whether construed in medieval Christianity as indications of God’s punishment and the fall of the pagan world, or in the humanist, moral sense of vanitas ( memento mori ) and transience ( sic transit gloria mundi ), or of glory and inevitable fall, as Rome told by its very ruins ( Roman quanta fuit ipsa ruina docet ), the ruin served as the pretext for a meditation—on religious truth, on the exemplarity of history, or on the inevitable passing of time. The aesthetics of ruins is...

latinisms

latinisms   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
163 words

...in scholarly contexts ( e.g. , i.e. , ibid. , id. ); (3) the ones used in jargon of doctors, lawyers, and scientists ( metatarsus , habeas corpus , chlorella ); (4) the mottoes and maxims used especially in ceremonial contexts ( E pluribus unum , Sic transit gloria mundi ); (5) the ones that literate people know and occasionally find useful ( ipse dixit , non sequitur , rebus , mutatis mutandis ); and (6) the truly rare ones that characterize sesquipedality ( ceteris paribus , hic et ubique , ignoratio elenchi ). ...

Thomas à Kempis

Thomas à Kempis (13791471)   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
332 words

...and God laughs’ in a TV interview, which sounds like a modern development of the old proverb. O quam cito transit gloria mundi [O, how quickly the world's glory passes away]. In the same work. More usually rendered as ‘ Sic transit gloria mundi [So passes away the glory of the world].’ This expression is used at the coronation ceremony of Popes when a reed surmounted with flax is burned and a chaplain intones: ‘ Pater sancte, sic transit gloria mundi ’ to remind the new Holy Father of the transitory nature of human vanity. ODQ (1992) says, however, that...

Transience

Transience   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
866 words

...version is: ‘This also shall pass away’ in Edward Fitzgerald Polonius (1852) And this, too, shall pass away Sic transit gloria mundi. Thus passes the glory of the world. said during the coronation of a new Pope, while flax is burned to represent the transitoriness of earthly glory Anonymous used at the coronation of Alexander V in Pisa, 7 July 1409, but earlier in origin; see Thomas à Kempis Sic transit gloria mundi Sic transit gloria mundi passes the glory of the world glory of the world All flesh is as grass, and all the glory of man as the flower...

Anonymous

Anonymous   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Political Quotations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
2,972 words

...Gordon Brown and Peter Mandelson in The Mail on Sunday 19 May 1996 anchor of ideology compass of principle rocks of mere personality Sic transit gloria mundi. Thus passes the glory of the world. said during the coronation of a new Pope, while flax is burned to represent the transitoriness of earthly glory used at the coronation of Alexander V in Pisa, 7 July 1409, but earlier in origin Sic transit gloria mundi Thus passes the glory of the world The silly, flat, dishwatery utterances of the man who has to be pointed out to intelligent observers as...

Anonymous

Anonymous   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
11,058 words

...salve , regina Salve, regina hail holy queen Hail holy queen this vale of tears this vale of tears Sic transit gloria mundi. Thus passes the glory of the world. said during the coronation of a new Pope, while flax is burned to represent the transitoriness of earthly glory used at the coronation of Alexander V in Pisa, 7 July 1409, but earlier in origin; see thomas à kempis Sic transit gloria mundi Sic transit gloria mundi Sic transit gloria mundi passes the glory of the world glory of the world glory of the world Te Deum laudamus: Te Dominum...

Anonymous

Anonymous   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
8,736 words

... ad astra ardua ad astra struggle to the stars Sic semper tyrannis. Thus always to tyrants. motto of the State of Virginia; see Booth Sic semper tyrannis Sic semper tyrannis Sic transit gloria mundi. Thus passes the glory of the world. said during the coronation of a new Pope, while flax is burned to represent the transitoriness of earthly glory used at the coronation of Alexander V in Pisa, 7 July 1409, but earlier in origin; see Thomas à Kempis Sic transit gloria mundi Sic transit gloria mundi passes the glory of the world glory of the world...

Fragment

Fragment   Reference library

A. Slessarev

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
1,137 words

...poetry for its suggestion of nature’s triumph over civilization, and the ruined aesthetic of the fragment appealed to the Eng. picturesque imagination. Meanwhile, the fragment’s implication of the passage of time and its lack of temporal context aligned with the sic transit gloria mundi meditation. While Eng. poets produced a body of work that can be called fragmentary in retrospect, Ger. romantic poets actively cultivated a fragmentary aesthetic. The Jena circle, founded by K.W.F. Schlegel and A. W. Schlegel , published a series of philosophical...

Narrative Theory

Narrative Theory   Reference library

Didier Coste

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Literary Theory

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Literature, Literary theory and cultural studies
Length:
18,678 words
Illustration(s):
2

...is the discourse of change, not action; it provides a transitive view of the world. 18 Daniel Punday is eager to add a spatial dimension, one of movement, to what he sees as limited to change in time in Didier Coste’s definition of narrative meaning. 19 But, if “ sic transit gloria mundi ” could be the blasé motto of narrative discourse, then the spatial dimension is ipso facto already present in the inevitable metaphors of “passing,” “going to,” and “going through” (the Catalan language strangely uses the auxiliary verb “va” for its narrative preterit)....

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