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show a leg

Subject: History

The traditional call of the boatswain's mates in a British warship when the hands are called to turn out in the morning. It arose from the days of sail when seamen, who were signed on for ...

‘show a leg’

‘show a leg’   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
176 words

...show a leg’ , or ‘shake a leg’ , the traditional call of the boatswain 's mates in a British warship when the hands are called to turn out in the morning. It arose from the days of sail when seamen, who were signed on for the duration of a ship's commission , were always refused shore leave when in harbour for fear that they would desert. Instead of going ashore, women, ostensibly wives, were allowed to live on board while the ship remained in harbour, and of course joined the men in their hammocks at night. When hands were called in the morning, the...

show a leg!

show a leg! excl.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
427 words

...the morning falls to the master at arms, and he says ‘show a leg’ or ‘rise up and shine’. 1914 ‘ Bartimeus ’ ‘The Night Watches’ in Naval Occasions 181: 'Eave out, 'eave out, 'eave out ! Show a leg there, show a leg ! Sun's a-scorching your eyes out! 1919 Marvel 1 Mar. 16: Show a leg, you cannibal freaks! 1925 (con. WWI) Fraser & Gibbons Soldier and Sailor Words 142: Leg, Show A: Wake up. Turn out. 1931 J. Hanley Boy 142: Show a leg, you sucker. 1934 T. Wood Cobbers 79: Show a leg, me lucky lads! 1941 ‘Kiss Me Goodnight, Sergeant...

show a leg

show a leg v.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
161 words

... a leg v. ( also show leg ) [ show a leg , to make an appearance, is SE] to run off, to escape; to move at speed. 1821 ‘ An Amateur ’ Real Life in London I 137: [He] grabb'd his pocket-handkerchief, and was after shewing a leg,† when a little boy that kept his oglers upon 'em, let me into the secret, and let the cat out of the bag by bawling—Stop thief! [† Shewing a leg —or, as it is sometimes called, giving leg bail—making the best use of legs to escape detection]. 1837 R.M. Bird Nick of the Woods I 177: I'll fight for you, or run for you,...

show a leg

show a leg  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The traditional call of the boatswain's mates in a British warship when the hands are called to turn out in the morning. It arose from the days of sail when seamen, who were signed on for the ...
Hebrews

Hebrews   Reference library

Harold W. Attridge and Harold W. Attridge

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
22,421 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...The phrase should be translated ‘by saying’ and refers to the way in which the addressees are called upon to exhort one another in v. 13 . v. 16 , the homilist probes the application of the text with a series of questions, each of which uses a phrase of the psalm, a technique frequently exemplified in Philo's exegesis (e.g. Quis Heres , 115, 260–1; Spec. Leg. 3.25). These questions direct attention to the details of the failure of the ancient Israelites. The response that ‘all who left Egypt’ were at fault may recall YHWH's comment to Moses at Num 14:22 ,...

Twelfth Night

Twelfth Night   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,487 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...by male costume’s display of her figure. Dorothea Jordan was a sensation in the 1790s, and Leigh Hunt ’s account of the part is dominated by his attention to Ann Maria Tree’s limbs: ‘It is impossible not to be struck…with a leg like this. It is fit for a statue: still fitter for where it is.’ Equally appealing successors in the part included Charlotte Cushman , Ada Rehan , and Ellen Terry . Increasing decorative elaboration in the 19th century led to frequent transpositions of scenes, a tendency which culminated in Beerbohm Tree ’s 1901 production,...

2 Maccabees

2 Maccabees   Reference library

R. Doran and R. Doran

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
20,060 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and Christian, located it at Antioch. However, there is no indication of a change of scene from the preceding account, and the folk-tale type where a ruler is bested by a wiser underling argues against any search for a specific locale. The wicked character of the emperor is stressed, as the martyrs respond calmly while the emperor loses control of himself. vv. 3–5 , the brothers are all dehumanized, as first the tongue, the instrument of human communication, is cut out and then, with legs and arms lopped off, the first brother is fried like an animal. vv....

James

James   Reference library

Rainer Riesner and Rainer Riesner

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
10,287 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... 1 Enoch 48:7; 108:8 ; Apoc. Abr. 29:8 ; T. Iss. 4:6 ) and not a material one as in Gnosticism. To ‘care for orphans and widows’ ( v. 27 b ) is a common command in the OT ( Deut 14:28; Jer 5:28; Sir 4:10 , etc.) and was practised with great care in the primitive community of Jerusalem ( Acts 6:1–6 ). The ‘pure and undefiled’ religion ( v. 27 a ; cf. Philo, Leg. All. 1.50) is addressed to ‘God, the Father’. To call God three times ‘Father’ ( 1:17, 27; 3:9 ) is unusually often in a Jewish writing and might echo Jesus' regular address to God. The Love...

The Wisdom of Solomon

The Wisdom of Solomon   Reference library

William Horbury and William Horbury

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
21,675 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...is spelt out later in Philo ( Vit. Mos. 2.117–35; Spec. Leg. 1.84–97) and Josephus ( J. W. 5.232–5; Ant. 3.184–7). Sinners Justly Met a Strange End in the Sea, but the Righteous were Saved there, for the Elements are Governed in Favour of God's People ( 19:1–22 ) The seventh and last contrast ( 19:5 ), from Ex 14:1–15:19 , is between the doom that justly filled up the torments of the ungodly by a strange death in the Red Sea ( vv. 1, 4–5 ), and the safe passage of God's people amidst a series of wonders ( vv. 6–12 ). The same interchange of elements...

Richard III

Richard III   Reference library

Randall Martin and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,559 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...1984 the RSC’s Antony Sher recreated Richard as a ‘bottled spider’: a pair of crutches and a medieval gown with hanging sleeves gave the impression of six legs, as Sher scuttled rapidly about. Michael Bogdanov and Michael Pennington reverted to Barton’s condensed cycle format for their eclectic and politicized production in 1986–9 for the English Shakespeare Company , in which a strikingly bald and northern-accented Andrew Jarvis, initially in 1930s dress, finally appeared in a pinstriped suit before a computer screen. This production influenced...

Acts

Acts   Reference library

Loveday Alexander and Loveday Alexander

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
42,037 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...waters for a future visit: the earlier sense that the Spirit had forbidden mission in Asia ( 16:6 ) appears to be still in his mind ( v. 20 ). Luke seems to have no inside information on Paul's motivation for this visit. He clearly wants to touch base with the home church in Syrian Antioch ( v. 22 ), but appears to have paid a brief visit to Jerusalem as well: the Greek has simply ‘he went up’, but this is a reasonable construction given that he then goes ‘down’ (normal idiom for a journey away from Jerusalem) to Antioch. A brief note ( v. 23 ) shows Paul going...

Humanity and Islam

Humanity and Islam   Reference library

‘Ali Shari‘ati

Liberal Islam: A Sourcebook

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
6,585 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...to this line of reasoning: “In animals essence precedes existence, while in humans existence precedes essence.” For instance, if I ask a carpenter, “What are you making?” he would respond, “A chair.” “What is a chair?” I ask. He continues, “A chair has four legs, a seat,” and so on. Such descriptions are the essence of the chair, although it is not in existence yet. However, according to Sartre, humankind is unlike a chair. Its existence emerged first. But what is it now? Nothing! We do not know yet! Humankind's “how-ness and who-ness” will emerge later;...

Dutch Family Names

Dutch Family Names   Reference library

Leendert Brouwer, Peter McClure, and Charles Gehring

Dictionary of American Family Names (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Names studies
Length:
11,476 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...man, and de Kever ‘the beetle’, perhaps for a short, stubby person. Metonymic names (based on contiguity rather than similarity) are even more common, but it is often difficult to be sure what the original bearers’ associations were with the objects or incidents from which their name derived. poot ‘paw, leg’ no doubt referred to something physically remarkable but there is no way of knowing exactly what this was. Did the bearer have long legs or a crippled leg? Nicknames invite questions that we are rarely able to answer. Were names such as Pannekoek ...

Extra-canonical early Christian literature

Extra-canonical early Christian literature   Reference library

J. K. Elliott and J. K. Elliott

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
30,133 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the Twelve Apostles to the Gentiles ). It is a short manual of church discipline prefaced by a section on morals. The only complete extant Greek MS is from the eleventh century, and this was rediscovered only in 1873. Its publication in 1883 by P. Bryennios generated great interest. Since then a fourth-century Greek fragment (P. Oxy. 1782 containing Did. 1:3 b –4; 2:7 b –3:2 a ) has come to light and this helps prove that the Didache was known in Egypt by that time. The Greek Apostolic Constitutions, which shows knowledge of the Didache, also comes from...

English, Scottish, and Anglo-Irish Family Names

English, Scottish, and Anglo-Irish Family Names   Reference library

Peter McClure and Patrick Hanks

Dictionary of American Family Names (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Names studies
Length:
13,029 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...The exact sense of some names of this type can be elusive. legg and foote may have alluded to someone with a bad leg or foot but there are other possibilities, such as a reference to long or short legs or to large feet. Complimentary and uncomplimentary names look straightforward enough but it would be a mistake to take them only at face value. goodfellow is literally ‘good fellow’ but the phrase was sometimes used in Middle English to denote a rascal. Nicknames then, as now, could be meant ironically, and disparaging ones are often given in good-natured...

John

John   Reference library

René Kieffer and René Kieffer

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
52,850 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...later additions to the soldiers' action in vv. 31–4 a and to the fulfilment of the scripture in vv. 36–7 . Others think that even vv. 34 a and 37 are additions. All these reconstructions are merely hypothetical. The evangelist himself distinguishes between two actions: the breaking of the legs in vv. 31–3 and the piercing of the side in v. 34 . In vv. 35–7 he comments on both actions. vv. 31–3 , the sabbath coincides with 15 Nisan ( cf. v. 14 ). According to Deut 21:23 a corpse hanged on a tree must be buried before nightfall. For purity reasons...

The Necessity of Renewing Islamic Thought and Reinvigorating Religious Understanding

The Necessity of Renewing Islamic Thought and Reinvigorating Religious Understanding   Reference library

Nurcholish Madjid

Liberal Islam: A Sourcebook

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
7,874 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...which already existed there. A greater interest in Islam is being shown by people in the higher social classes; even if they do not practice it themselves they at least show such an interest in their official attitudes. But we have a question that still needs to be answered, that is, to what extent is that development a result of genuine attraction to the ideas of Islam as presented by its leaders, verbally or in written form? Or can this Islamic quantitative growth be regarded as nothing more than a phenomenon of social adaptation...

Proverbs

Proverbs   Reference library

K. T. Aitken and K. T Aitken

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
20,819 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...carry it through to a successful end ( cf. v. 15; 6:6–11 ). ( 20:1–30 ) Drunkenness. Excessive drinking turns a person into a mocker and a brawler ( v. 1; cf. 23:29–35 ). It befuddles the senses and excites belligerence. The last phrase may mean to drink to excess is not wise or that it makes a person act unwisely. Laziness . v. 4 shows again the inevitable step from laziness to want ( cf. 12:27; 13:4 ). Perhaps citing the wet and the cold of autumn (‘in season’) as his excuse for not ploughing ( cf. 26:13 ), the farmer foolishly expects a harvest for which...

Ecclesiasticus, or The Wisdom of Jesus Son of Sirach

Ecclesiasticus, or The Wisdom of Jesus Son of Sirach   Reference library

John J. Collins and John J. Collins

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
38,105 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...has no occasion to buy a field, and her labour is not needed outside the house. Instead she is portrayed as an ornament in his home. This is the only passage where Ben Sira shows an appreciation of physical beauty (contrast 25:21 ). It is characteristic of ancient Near-Eastern love poetry to single out parts of the body for praise. Cf. Song 4:1–7 ; 1Qap Gen 20:2–7 . The description of Sarah in the latter passage comments on the perfection of her legs. Ben Sira differs from the other passages however in drawing his analogies from the furnishings of the...

Leviticus

Leviticus   Reference library

Lester L. Grabbe and Lester L. Grabbe

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
22,756 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...fellows but love them ( vv. 17–18 ); avoid mixtures ( v. 19 ); if a man has sex with a betrothed slave woman ( vv. 20–2 ); the first fruits of a fruit tree ( vv. 23–5 ); do not eat blood ( v. 26 ); do not practice divination ( v. 26 ); do not disfigure yourself for the dead ( vv. 27–8 ); do not make your daughter a prostitute ( v. 29 ); keep the sabbaths and honour the sanctuary ( v. 30 ); do not seek to contact spirits of the dead ( v. 31 ); show respect for the elderly ( v. 32 ); love the resident alien ( vv. 33–4 ); have honest scales and measures ( vv....

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