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SHEEP

Acronym for sky-high earnings expectations possibly: applied to investments that appear to offer an unusually high return but that may prove very unreliable.

sheep

sheep   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Idioms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
143 words

... sheep the black sheep : see black . count sheep count imaginary sheep jumping over a fence one by one in an attempt to send yourself to sleep. 1977 Harvey Pitcher When Miss Emmie was in Russia Did you know that if you count sheep, it is...

sheep

sheep   Quick reference

A Dictionary of the Bible (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Religion
Length:
99 words

... Domesticated by the time of * Jacob (Gen. 30: 37–42); sheep provided meat, wool, hide, and milk, and so were fundamental to human existence. Their shepherds were in constant search of suitable pasture (1 Chron. 4: 39–40). In the NT sheep are often used as a metaphor: thus, the people of Israel are compared to sheep without a shepherd (Matt. 9: 36) and Jesus is ‘a good shepherd’ who gives his life for his sheep (John 10: 7–9) but, also, he himself is compared to a sheep that is led to the slaughter (Acts 8:...

sheep

sheep   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Christian Art and Architecture (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
124 words

... are one of the commonest symbols of the faithful, deriving from Christ's charge to Peter ( John 21: 4–17) to ‘Feed my sheep’. Isaiah 53: 6 says, ‘And we like sheep have gone astray’; and in Matt. 25: 32 Christ says, ‘He will separate them … as a shepherd divides his sheep from the goats …’; and in the general confession of the Book of Common Prayer are the words, ‘We have erred and strayed from thy ways like lost sheep.’ The Apostles themselves are often represented by sheep in Early Christian mosaics, as, for instance in Sant' Apollinare in Classe, outside...

Sheep

Sheep   Reference library

Alexander Kazhdan

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
243 words

...might own up to 300 sheep and goats; the Vlachs were esp. active in sheep breeding. Sheep were particularly suited to the practice of transhumance ; the vita of Lazaros of Mt. Galesios describes large flocks guarded by dogs moving across Cappadocia. This led to the perennial conflict between settled agriculturists and migrating shepherds (J.G. Keenan, YCS 28 [ 1985 ] 245–59). Images of sheep and lambs occupied an important place in Christian allegory: they were a metaphor for Christ, the Lamb of God , and for his flock; sheep were the righteous at the...

SHEEP

SHEEP   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Business and Management (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences, Business and Management
Length:
24 words

... Acronym for sky-high earnings expectations possibly: applied to investments that appear to offer an unusually high return but that may prove very...

SHEEP

SHEEP   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Finance and Banking (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... Acronym for sky-high earnings expectations possibly: applied to investments that appear to offer an unusually high return but that may prove very unreliable....

Sheep

Sheep   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...a ‘draft-ewe’. Sheep dressed as lamb Said of a woman of some maturity who ‘dolls herself up’ to give the appearance of being much younger. See also mutton dressed as lamb . Sheepish Awkward and shy; bashful through not knowing how to deport oneself in the circumstances; embarrassed through shame. Sheep’s eyes A now rather dated term for an amorous or ‘come-hither’ look. See also make eyes at ( under eye ). As well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb See under as . Black sheep of the family, The See under black . Count sheep, To See under count...

sheep

sheep   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
117 words

...sheep [ME] We have had sheep in the language since Anglo-Saxon times, but perhaps surprisingly people did not start using the word to mean ‘someone too easily influenced or led’ until the 16th century. The expression to separate the sheep from the goats , ‘to divide people or things into superior and inferior groups’, is a biblical reference to the account of the Last Judgement in the Gospel of Matthew, which describes how all the nations of the world will be gathered before God and how ‘He shall separate them one from another, as a shepherd divideth his...

sheep

sheep ([Sp])   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
297 words

...ammon ), very large sheep found in the Himalayas, Mongolia, and western Siberia; snow sheep , large‐sized sheep found in Siberia; dall sheep , found in Alaska and the northern Rocky Mountains; and bighorns , found in the mountains of western parts of North America. The domestication of sheep appears to have taken place in the Near East before 7000 bc . At Ali Kosh , in the southern Zagros Mountains of Iran, an assemblage dating to about 7000 bc that includes hornless sheep is taken as clear evidence of flock manipulation. Sheep seem to appear in...

sheep

sheep   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
49 words

... Ruminants of the genus Ovis , and those of the less numerous genera Pseudois and Ammotragus . Domestic sheep, O. aries , are now bred for wool , fur (karakul), and meat. Wild species are found in the mountains of Europe, Asia, Africa and North America. All are of the Family...

sheep

sheep   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
292 words

...England and Wales had 11 million sheep in the late 17th century, and in 1741 an anonymous writer estimated the sheep population of Great Britain at 16–17 million. Meanwhile, Ireland was exporting sheep to Britain. See Clearances, Highland , for the expansion of sheep farming in the Scottish Highlands during the 18th and 19th centuries. By the end of the 18th century most rough pastures and much of the improved grasslands were grazed by sheep ( see foldcourse , for the practice of night‐time folding of sheep brought down from the pastures to manure the...

sheep

sheep   Reference library

Michael Decker

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... The most important livestock in ancient agriculture, outnumbering goats in all but marginal landscapes . Sheep remained vital in the post-Roman world. On Anglo-Saxon sites in Britain , in the 5th and 6th centuries , sheep comprised up to 50% of all domestic animals (Crabtree). Sheep provided wool, milk, and meat . They were grazed away from growing crops and gardens , generally in marginal areas, though their dung was important for fertilizing arable after the harvest had been gathered. Wool was the principal product for which sheep were...

sheep

sheep   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
211 words

...Already in the 17th century, flocks of up to 20,000 sheep were recorded, and Arthur Young described large areas of land as being set aside as sheep walks in the 1770s. However, overall numbers remained relatively low until the mid‐19th century, when a massive increase began, especially in upland areas. Depopulation and a long‐term swing towards livestock farming provided an incentive for many landlords to introduce large‐scale, systematic sheep rearing on marginal areas. By 1900 there were 4.4 million sheep in Ireland; by the 1990s this had risen to over 9.9...

sheep

sheep   Reference library

Rebecca J. H. Woods

The Oxford Companion to Cheese

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Society and culture, Cookery, Food, and Drink
Length:
1,518 words
Illustration(s):
1

...record. Sheep are gregarious animals that hew to a home range in hefts, or groups of related females; rams associate in age cohorts, interacting with females only during the rut, or mating season. The social structure of sheep—which includes deference to a single, dominant leader, and strong bonds between individuals—as well as relatively weak territorial instincts (unlike deer, sheep will not defend their home range), likely facilitated the process of domestication. A human herdsman could be substituted for a dominant animal, and as sheep are neither...

sheep

sheep   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Genetics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
67 words

... a mammal belonging to the genus Ovis and domesticated for its meat, milk, wool, and hide. The domestic sheep, Ovis aries ( q.v. ), is distributed worldwide, and common breeds are Merino, Rambouillet, Finn Dorset, Debouillet, Lincoln, Leicester, Cotswold, Romney, Corridale, Columbia, Romeldale, Panama, Montadale, Polwarth, Targee, Hampshire, Shropshire, Southdown, Suffolk, Cheviot, Oxford, Tunis, Ryeland, and Blackface Highland. The most famous member of this species was Dolly ( q.v....

sheep

sheep   Reference library

Laura Mason

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Society and culture, Cookery, Food, and Drink
Length:
1,069 words

...is possible that Romney Marsh sheep are descended from Roman imports. It was in comparatively recent times, following the start of the Industrial Revolution and the consequent increase in the demand for meat, that the breeding of sheep for meat made important advances in Britain. The coming of railways led to movement of sheep over long distances to urban markets, and began to erode strong regional preferences in the size and conformation of mutton carcasses. The 19th century also saw the beginning of a lively export trade of sheep for breeding from Britain (and...

sheep

sheep   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Agriculture and Land Management

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
409 words

...are numerous vernacular terms for sheep of various ages; for example, a ewe of eighteen months old as it is put to the tup may be described as a two-tooth. Breeds of sheep in the UK Beulah Speckled Face Hampshire Down Romney Blue Faced Leicester Hebridean Scottish Blackface Border Leicester Herdwick Shetland Charollais Jacob South Down Cheviot Kerry Hill Swaledale Clun Forest Lleyn Suffolk Cotswold Lonk Texel Dorset Down Masham Welsh Mountain Dorset Horn Oxford Down Wensleydale Traditional and not uncommon are crossbred sheep that have been reared in the...

sheep dip

sheep dip   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... dip A liquid disinfectant and insecticide in which sheep are immersed to protect them from pests and...

sheep-dip

sheep-dip   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Agriculture and Land Management

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
61 words

...-dip A chemical compound in which the sheep is immersed to control ectoparasites such as ticks , blowflies , mites , and lice. The active ingredient of most dips is an organophosphate chemical which is highly toxic, and thus use and disposal is strictly regulated. There has been controversy surrounding the illness of shepherds and other workers exposed to sheep...

Sheep Gate

Sheep Gate   Quick reference

A Dictionary of the Bible (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Religion
Length:
65 words

... Gate On the north side of the Temple in Jerusalem and built after the return from Exile (Neh. 3: 1). It was probably the best way into the city for sheep to be driven for the * sacrifices . The gate was apparently near the pool of Bethesda (John 5: 2), though the Greek text here is uncertain (the word ‘gate’ is absent in the...

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