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sensory conflict theory

A proposed explanation for motion sickness according to which passive movement creates a mismatch between information relating to orientation and movement supplied by the visual and the ...

sensory conflict theory

sensory conflict theory n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... conflict theory n . A proposed explanation for motion sickness according to which passive movement creates a mismatch between information relating to orientation and movement supplied by the visual and the vestibular systems, and it is this mismatch that induces feelings of...

sensory conflict theory

sensory conflict theory  

A proposed explanation for motion sickness according to which passive movement creates a mismatch between information relating to orientation and movement supplied by the visual and the vestibular ...
motion sickness

motion sickness n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...nausea, and sometimes vomiting. It is often associated with vehicular transport, people suffering from it being described as being airsick , carsick , or seasick , and antihistamine drugs or scopolamine are often prescribed for its prevention. See also sensory conflict theory...

motion sickness

motion sickness   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Body

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
741 words

...has been called the sensory conflict theory of motion sickness. This is based on the notion that the stimuli which cause motion sickness are those that generate sensations that do not conform with a repertoire of expected sensations that has been built up and stored in the brain on the basis of past experience of the sensory stimulation associated with motion. Two major sources of sensory conflict are recognized: intra-vestibular and visual–vestibular. Intra-vestibular conflict arises from the fact that there are two types of sensory organ in the vestibular...

Abstractive and Intuitive Cognition

Abstractive and Intuitive Cognition   Reference library

The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
1,432 words

...heart of all late medieval theories of sense-perception and intellectual knowledge. It was introduced by John Duns Scotus as a result of his dissatisfaction with the Aristotelian understanding of sense-perception and knowledge, in particular with the Thomistic interpretation of it, which relied on the so-called theory of species . After Scotus, the distinction was further developed by William of Ockham . Fourteenth-century discussions of abstractive and intuitive cognition deal to a great extent with the conflicting theories of Scotus and Ockham. In...

Rivers, William Halse Rivers

Rivers, William Halse Rivers (1864–1922)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
323 words

...to the expedition, Rivers was particularly active in measuring sensory thresholds and visual illusions in what was probably the first cross-cultural study ever carried out. Notwithstanding his concern with anthropology, Rivers never wholly forsook his physiological interests, collaborating with the neurologist Henry Head in an important study of the changes in tactile sensation resulting from the severance of a cutaneous nerve, Head himself being the subject. Their findings led them to the theory that there are two forms of cutaneous sensation, one...

pain

pain   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,588 words

...It further proposes that the sensory input is modulated at successive synapses throughout its projection from the spinal cord to the brain areas responsible for pain experience and response. Pain occurs when the number of nerve impulses that arrive at these areas exceeds a critical level. Melzack and Wall ( 1982 ) have recently assessed the present-day status of the gate control theory in the light of new physiological research. It is apparent that the theory is alive and well despite considerable controversy and conflicting evidence. Although some of the...

von Hayek, Friedrich August

von Hayek, Friedrich August (1899–1992)   Reference library

The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
3,929 words

...of “experience” or “learning”’ ( The Sensory Order , p. 53). Furthermore, he drew a distinction between the physical order of external events (or ‘the macrocosm’) and the sensory order of the mind (or ‘the microcosm’) and asserted, first, the impossibility of acquiring direct knowledge of the former (since in the process of cognition the mind, using its classificatory apparatus, would always proceed by constructing theoretical models of the external world: thus all knowledge of the external world would always be theory-laden), and second, the necessarily...

Gestalt theory

Gestalt theory   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,956 words
Illustration(s):
7

...theory . A theory developed in opposition to the classical theory of psychology best represented by J. S. Mill and H. von Helmholtz . In the classical account of perception , our sensory receptors analyse the energies provided by the physical world into independent, simple, but unnoticeable sensations, and the world teaches us to perceive those objects and events that would, under normal conditions, most probably have produced any given set of sensations. Many perceptual phenomena, however, seem at first to defy analysis in terms of such ‘atomistic’...

Turner, Victor

Turner, Victor (1920–1983)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Semiotics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
1,540 words

...“sensory” (or the orectic). The ideological pole indexes cognitive referents to moral and social order, and the sensory that of referents to the body, emotions, and nature. In the tribal rituals that Turner studied, these two poles coalesce within dominant symbols, enabling the exchange of their meanings within these symbols. Therefore, these symbols are media of transformation. Among the Ndembu, rites of passage, rites of affliction, and rites that treated infertility were all characterized by this transformative interchange between ideological and sensory...

Bawden, Henry Heath

Bawden, Henry Heath (1871–1950)   Reference library

The Dictionary of Modern American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
996 words

...Significance of the Terms ‘Sensory' and ‘Motor', ” Psychological Review 7 (1900): 390–400. “ The Psychological Theory of Organic Evolution, ” Journal of Comparative Neurology 11 (1901): 251–76. A Syllabus of Psychology (Poughkeepsie, N.Y., 1902). “ The Functional View of the Relation between the Psychical and the Physical, ” Philosophical Review 11 (1902): 474–84. “ The Meaning of the Psychical from the Point of View of the Functional Psychology, ” Philosophical Review 13 (1904): 298–319. “ Recent Tendencies in the Theory of the Psychical and the...

Molyneux's question

Molyneux's question   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Consciousness

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,463 words
Illustration(s):
1

...an intuitive physics, a rudimentary theory about the behaviours of objects. And, you might argue, it is the same physical theory that penetrates vision as penetrates touch. Whether perceived through vision or touch, round things roll, square things stack together without leaving gaps, and so on. We take the regularities governing the behaviours of objects of particular shapes to be the same, whatever the modality through which they are perceived. You might argue that this sameness of intuitive theory penetrating the sensory modality is all it takes for it to be...

touch

touch   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Consciousness

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,874 words

...judging the temporal order of tactile stimulations delivered on the crossed hands due to conflict between the body‐centred and the external frames of reference. The template of touch is not only proprioceptive, but also visual. These illusions raise a more important worry for the template theory: although they do not show that touch is completely independent of bodily awareness, they do point toward some possible dissociations between them. The template theory can account for the privileged relations between touch and the body, at the cost of forbidding...

Evolutionary Economics

Evolutionary Economics   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Evolution

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences, Social sciences, Anthropology
Length:
967 words
Illustration(s):
2

...A. The Sensory Order . Chicago, 1952. Hayek, F. A. Studies in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics . Chicago, 1967. Hayek, F. A. The Fatal Conceit . Chicago, 1988. Hirshleifer, J. “ Evolutionary Models in Economics and Law: Cooperation versus Conflict Strategies. ” Research in Law and Economics 4 (1982): 1–60. Hoffman, E. , K. McCabe , and V. Smith . “ Behavioral Foundations of Reciprocity: Experimental Economics and Evolutionary Psychology. ” Economic Inquiry 36 (1998): 335–352. McCabe, K. , S. Rassenti , and V. Smith . “ Game Theory and...

spatial coordination

spatial coordination   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
4,867 words
Illustration(s):
6

...Orientation . Jackson, C. V. (1953). ‘ Visual factors in auditory localization ’. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology , 5. Pick, H. L. , Warren, D. H. , and Hay, J. C. (1969). ‘ Sensory conflicts in judgements of spatial direction ’. Perception and Psychophysics , 6. Rock, I. , and Victor, J. (1964). ‘ Vision and touch: an experimentally created conflict between the two senses ’. Science ,143. Stratton, G. M. (1897). ‘ Upright vision and the retinal image ’. Psychological Review , 4. Templeton, W. B. , Howard, I. P. , and Lowman, A. E. ...

Music psychology

Music psychology   Reference library

Harold Fiske and Jack Heller

The Grove Dictionary of American Music (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
4,920 words

...validity of Information Theory, which leaves unanswered the question about the most valid choice. The unresolved problem of selecting a suitable observational perspective notwithstanding, Moles's theory is important for music psychology because, by demonstrating the conflicts between the three levels of observation, the problem of assessing music as an intact object is revealed. Moles unintentionally (and unknowingly) discovered the inadequacies of Copy paradigm, anticipating the purge of Copy theory in favor of Construction theory a decade or so later. This...

Feeling

Feeling   Reference library

Susan L. Feagin

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
1,879 words

...in novels, just as in life, may provide a kind of understanding that is irreplaceable by conscious thought. Contrary to theories that take feelings to be irrational, on this view feelings are potential grounds for judgments and action, so the lack of feeling is a psychological deficit. Theater is multi-sensory by nature; its “technologies” such as sound, lighting, costume, set design, and props are used to concentrate and heighten sensory effects and juxtapose sense experience and narrative for affective (and cognitive) purposes. Sound design, for example,...

Eisenstein, Sergei Mikhailovich

Eisenstein, Sergei Mikhailovich (1898)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
2,277 words

...of tragedy. Conflict For Eisenstein, collision was not simply a method of montage but the principle of art in general. In the twenties, he found conflict everywhere. Unlike most of modernist acting reformers of the twenties (Meyerhold, Kuleshov, Nikolai Forreger), Eisenstein's idea of expressivity foregrounded conflict rather than accord within the moving body (gravity vs. effort, volition vs. inertia, etc.). As musical analogy gained weight in Eisenstein's later aesthetics, he would instead use the term “counterpoint” to stress that conflict was a...

Eisenstein, Sergei Mikhailovich

Eisenstein, Sergei Mikhailovich (1898–1948)   Reference library

Yuri Tsivian

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
2,562 words

...tragedy. Conflict. For Eisenstein, collision was not simply a method of montage but the principle of art in general. In the 1920s, he found conflict everywhere. Unlike most of modernist acting reformers of the 1920s (e.g., Meyerhold, Kuleshov, and Nikolai Foregger), Eisenstein’s idea of expressivity foregrounded conflict rather than harmony within the moving body (e.g., gravity vs. effort and volition vs. inertia). As the musical analogy gained weight in Eisenstein’s later aesthetics, he would instead use the term “counterpoint” to stress that conflict was a...

Interpretive Archaeology

Interpretive Archaeology   Reference library

John C. Barrett and Matthew H. Johnson

The Oxford Companion To Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
2,222 words

...that is not theory-laden or somehow outside the purview of interpretation. Ian Hodder has spoken of “interpretation at the trowel’s edge,” and developed the work of his team at the site of Çatalhöyuk as a case study in reflexive and interpretive methodologies, and there is now a wide body of literature that examines fieldwork activities such as excavation technique and landscape survey as particular kinds of theoretically laden practice. [ See also Critical Theory ; Cultural Ecology Theory ; Culture Historical Theory ; Darwinian Theory ; Gender...

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