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salt glaze

Subject: Archaeology

A type of glaze used on stoneware. Common salt was thrown into the kiln when it reached its maximum temperature. The salt combined with silicates in the clay to produce a thin, glazed ...

salt glaze

salt glaze   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
45 words

... glaze A type of glaze used on stoneware . Common salt was thrown into the kiln when it reached its maximum temperature. The salt combined with silicates in the clay to produce a thin, glazed surface with the texture of orange...

salt glaze

salt glaze noun   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
51 words
salt glaze

salt glaze noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
51 words
salt-glaze

salt-glaze noun   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
28 words
salt glaze

salt glaze  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
A type of glaze used on stoneware. Common salt was thrown into the kiln when it reached its maximum temperature. The salt combined with silicates in the clay to produce a thin, glazed surface with ...
salt‐glazed stoneware

salt‐glazed stoneware   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
87 words

...‐glazed stoneware [De] In the 14th century ad it was found that the addition of salt to the kiln gases during the firing of stoneware meant that the salt volatilized and the resultant sodium chloride vapour fluxed with the silicas in the body of the vessels to form a soda‐glass glaze. As a further refinement, a brown‐coloured surface could be achieved by coating the vessels in a thin iron wash before firing. A patent was granted for the manufacture of such saltglazed wares in England in 1671...

glaze

glaze  

Reference type:
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A transparent or semi-transparent layer of paint applied over another layer so as to modify its colour; the light passing through is reflected back by the under surface and altered by the glaze. The ...
Doultonware

Doultonware  

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High-fired vitrified non-porous salt-glazed ceramic made of a hard grey-brown material (stoneware) on which designs were drawn, a part or the whole then being richly coloured. Produced in the Doulton ...
Knütgen

Knütgen  

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German family of potters, active in late 16th-century Siegburg, where they made salt-glazed stoneware. Anno Knütgen (fl1564–83) was ducal governor of the monastery in Siegburg from 1564 to 1575. The ...
David Rhodes

David Rhodes  

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(d 1777).English pottery and porcelain enameller. In about 1760 he established a workshop in Leeds with Jasper Robinson, where they enamelled cream-coloured earthenware from the Leeds Pottery and ...
Rhenish brick

Rhenish brick  

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Salt glazed brick made in the Rhineland from the medieval period, and especially in C16 and C17, notably in Cologne. It was widely exported, and often decorated.
Martin

Martin  

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Overview Page
English family of potters. The first Martinware, a hard, salt-glazed stoneware, was produced in 1873 at the Fulham Pottery, London. From 1877 to 1914 it was made at Southall, London. ...
Pew group

Pew group  

Reference type:
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In ceramics, a group of figures on a high-backed settle, usually in salt-glazed stoneware. Pew groups date from the mid-18th century (e.g. of 1745–50; Kansas City, MO, Nelson–Atkins Mus. A.) ...
Martinware

Martinware  

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The name given to the type of pottery produced in the late 19th century by Robert Wallace Martin and his three brothers, Charles, Walter, and Edwin at their studio in Southall, Middlesex. Robert ...
sodium sulphate

sodium sulphate  

A white crystalline compound, Na2SO4, usually known as the anhydrous compound (orthorhombic; r.d. 2.67; m.p. 888°C) or the decahydrate (monoclinic; r.d. 1.46; which loses water at 100°C). The ...
black ice

black ice  

1 A popular name for glaze, often used in connection with its occurrence on roads, where it may form a significant hazard to traffic.2 Thin ice on fresh or salt water that is transparent and thus ...
potassium carbonate

potassium carbonate  

A translucent (granular) or white (powder) deliquescent solid known in the anhydrous and hydrated forms. K2CO3 (monoclinic; r.d. 2.4; m.p. 891°C) decomposes without boiling. 2K2CO3.3H2O (monoclinic; ...
Siegburg

Siegburg  

Reference type:
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German centre of ceramics production. From the late 14th century a greyish-white, salt-glazed stoneware was produced in Siegburg in the Rhineland. Among the earliest Siegburg wares were Jakobakannen ...
stoneware

stoneware  

Reference type:
Overview Page
[De]Pottery fired to a high temperature, usually over 1200°C, at which the fabric of the vessel vitrifies. Stoneware seems to have been produced first at Siegburg in Germany about 1200 ad.
Staffordshire

Staffordshire  

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Is one of the counties most affected by the industrial revolution. The county town has never dominated the shire. In pre‐Conquest days, it was overshadowed by Tamworth and Lichfield, in modern times ...

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