Update
The Oxford Biblical Studies Online and Oxford Islamic Studies Online have retired. Content you previously purchased on Oxford Biblical Studies Online or Oxford Islamic Studies Online has now moved to Oxford Reference, Oxford Handbooks Online, Oxford Scholarship Online, or What Everyone Needs to Know®. For information on how to continue to view articles visit the subscriber services page.
Dismiss

You are looking at 1-4 of 4 entries  for:

  • All: rule in Wilkinson v Downton x
clear all

View:

Overview

rule in Wilkinson v Downton

Subject: Law

The principle that where a defendant has wilfully committed an act or made a statement calculated to cause physical harm, and which does cause physical harm (including psychiatric injury), ...

rule in Wilkinson v Downton

rule in Wilkinson v Downton   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Law
Length:
95 words

... in Wilkinson v Downton The principle that where a defendant has wilfully committed an act or made a statement calculated to cause physical harm, and which does cause physical harm (including psychiatric injury), it is actionable. The tort requires actual intention to injure or a reckless disregard as to the consequences. This tort can be differentiated from trespass to the person as the cause of harm is indirect ( Wainwright v Home Office [ 2003 ] UKHL 53, [ 2004 ] 2 AC 406; C v D [ 2006 ] EWHC 166...

rule in Wilkinson v Downton

rule in Wilkinson v Downton  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
The principle that where a defendant has wilfully committed an act or made a statement calculated to cause physical harm, and which does cause physical harm (including psychiatric injury), it is ...
abuse, civil liability for

abuse, civil liability for   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
1,707 words

...fall within the strict parameters of traditional torts. In some cases, claimants have sought to use tort law creatively to deploy an existing cause of action to a new abuse‐related situation. In Khorasandjian v Bush ( 1993 ), for example, (decided before the 1997 Act was enacted), a claimant successfully invoked the rule in a relatively obscure case, Wilkinson v Downton ( 1897 ) (dealing with a practical joker who injured a woman by telling her, falsely, that her husband had been seriously harmed in an accident), to secure an injunction against a stalker...

Evatt, Herbert Vere

Evatt, Herbert Vere (born 30 April 1894)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the High Court of Australia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Law
Length:
2,901 words
Illustration(s):
1

...duty only. But he maintained in sole dissent that equity could preclude the land owner from revoking the licence or relying on its revocation. He followed the English decision in Hurst v Picture Theatres ( 1915 ), noting the Law Quarterly Review's praise of that decision for remedying an injustice in trespass law. In Bunyan v Jordan ( 1937 ), Evatt alone applied Wilkinson v Downton ( 1897 ) to permit recovery by a plaintiff whose terror at her employer's drunken threats had induced a neurasthenic illness, even though she did not apprehend physical...

View: