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romance

Subject: Literature

Derived from the Medieval Latin word romanice, ‘in the Roman language’. The word roman in Old French was applied to the popular courtly stories in verse which dealt with three traditional ...

Romance

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The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
12 words

... , play by Edward Sheldon , produced in 1913 and published in 1914...

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A Dictionary of Media and Communication (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
107 words

... 1. n. In contemporary usage, a popular literary and film genre, designed primarily for a female target audience , with a plot revolving around love, and often seen as a form of escapism . Medieval romances included the Arthurian tales, and by the late 18th century romances had become associated with improbable plots and high-blown language . Romance is one of Frye’s four main literary genres : see also comedy ; satire ; tragedy . 2. A personal relationship involving both emotional and sexual attraction; see also affiliation . 3. (...

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The Oxford Dictionary of Music (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music
Length:
113 words

... ( romanza [ It .] , Romanze [ Ger .] ) Title implying an especially personal or tender quality but with no strict formal application. May be used in vocal or instrumental music. Mozart called the slow movt of his pf conc. No.20 in D minor (K466) a ‘Romance’. Schumann wrote Drei Romanzen . Vaughan Williams used the term several times: his The Lark Ascending for vn and orch is a ‘Romance’ ( 1914 ), he wrote a Romance for harmonica, str, and pf ( 1951 ), and the slow movt of the 5th Sym. ( 1943 ) is entitled Romanza . Elgar wrote a Romance ...

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The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...( see arthurian literature , chivalric romance ). Medieval romance is distinguished from epic by its concentration on courtly love rather than warlike heroism. Long, elaborate romances were written during the Renaissance , including Ludovico Ariosto ’s Orlando Furioso ( 1532 ), Edmund Spenser ’s The Faerie Queene ( 1590–96 ), and Sir Philip Sidney ’s prose romance Arcadia ( 1590 ), but Cervantes ’s parody of romances in Don Quixote ( 1605 ) helped to undermine this tradition. Later prose romances differ from novels in their preference for...

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
49 words

... (Old French romanz , ‘vulgar tongue’) Literary form, typically a heroic tale or ballad usually in verse. The form derives from the medieval narratives of troubadours . The romance spread throughout Europe during the 12th century, was used in English by Chaucer , and remained popular through to the 16th...

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The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
165 words

...English romances are mostly in prose, and some 16th-century examples were the inspiration for Edmund Spenser and Shakespeare . A new interest in medieval romance (in writers such as Walter Scott and John Keats ) contributed to the naming of 19th-century Romanticism , though the term was also applied to some sentimental novels from the 18th century onwards, as in the Mills and Boon romances of the modern...

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The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
165 words

...century, English romances are mostly in prose, and some 16th-century examples were the inspiration for Edmund Spenser and Shakespeare . A new interest in medieval romance (in writers such as Walter Scott and John Keats ) contributed to the naming of 19th-century Romanticism , though the term was also applied to some sentimental novels from the 18th century onwards, as in the Mills and Boon romances of the modern...

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An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

... , a term applied to various forms of verse and prose narrative displaying archaic or exotic subject-matter, imaginative freedom, and motifs or structural features derived from *medieval and Renaissance romances (collectively known as ‘old Romance’). Such forms, which included allegorical poems, *Gothic and historical novels, verse tales on historical, *mythological [36] , and *oriental themes, and more experimental forms of psychological quest romance, acquired enormous popularity in the period, and subsequently contributed to the labelling of its...

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The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...style. He had certainly read other kinds of romances. He would have come across examples of ‘hagiographic romances’, stories on the border between the genre of romance and that of the saint's life, a pattern which seems to underlie his own Man of Law's Tale . He also knew French romances, such as the Roman de Thèbes . Much more unusual was his acquaintance with the newer Italian romances (or narrative poems on the edge of that genre). Boccaccio's Teseida and Il Filostrato . Chaucer's attitude to romances and chivalry has been much debated. Modern...

Romance

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Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
975 words

...Toronto, 1986. W. R. J. Barron , English Medieval Romance , London, 1987. M. Stanesco , M. Zink , Histoire européenne du roman médiéval , Paris, 1992. D. Kelly , The Art of Medieval French Romance , Madison (Wis), 1992. B. Schmolke-Hasselmann , The Evolution of Arthurian Romance , Cambridge, 1998. Pierre-Yves Badel Byzantium After having enjoyed a brilliant rise at the end of Antiquity, the genre of the romance went to sleep for the first eight centuries of the Byzantine Empire: while the Greek romances of the imperial period continued to be read, no new...

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A Dictionary of Critical Theory

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

... ( 1604 ) by Miguel de Cervantes, is a parody of courtly romances that at once undermines the genre and at the same time frees it to evolve in new directions. Romance today refers to what is essentially a sub-genre of the novel whose thematic focus is love— Jane Austen 's Pride and Prejudice ( 1813 ) is often taken as the starting point for this modulation of the romance genre, which extends all the way to the popular romances of the variety Mills & Boon publish. This version of the romance genre tends to be shorn of the more adventurous elements, and...

romance

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Sonia Massai

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... . The category of Shakespearian romance includes Pericles , Cymbeline , The Winter’s Tale , and The Tempest . Despite similarities in chronology and concerns, The Two Noble Kinsmen is often excluded from this category, partly because of its collaborative authorship and partly because it has more in common with Fletcherian romance than with Shakespeare’s ‘canonical’ romances. Edward Dowden ( 1843–1913 ) first applied the term ‘romance’ to Shakespeare’s late plays, which are alternatively referred to as tragicomedies . Neither term, however, was...

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A Dictionary of Critical Theory (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... ( 1604 ) by Miguel de Cervantes, is a parody of courtly romances that at once undermines the genre and at the same time frees it to evolve in new directions. Romance today refers to what is essentially a sub-genre of the novel whose thematic focus is love— Jane Austen ’s Pride and Prejudice ( 1813 ) is often taken as the starting point for this modulation of the romance genre, which extends all the way to the popular romances of the variety Mills & Boon publish. This version of the romance genre tends to be shorn of the more adventurous elements, and...

Romance

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The New Oxford Companion to Literature in French

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
1,759 words

...rich variety of 13th‐c. romances. Some were frankly misogynistic ( Raoul de Houdenc 's La Vengeance Raguidel, Le Chevalier à l'Epée ), others burlesqued courtly conventions ( Joufroi de Poitiers , the chantefable Aucassin et Nicolette ), while romances such as Durmart le Gallois attempted to preserve chivalric values. Other 13th‐c. romances have been dubbed ‘romans réalistes’ because of their contemporary geographical setting, historical figures, realistic descriptions, and absence of marvellous events; these include the romances of Jean Renart , ...

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A Dictionary of Film Studies (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
507 words

...of 1930s Hollywood romance in such films as Grand Hotel ( Edmund Goulding , 1932 ) and Camille ( George Cukor , 1936 ). As well as being the raison d’être of the romance film, love has been and remains a commonplace subplot element in films of other genres, including—but not only—those (like the musical , the melodrama , the costume drama , and the woman’s picture ) that cater to the perceived tastes of female audiences: indeed it has been estimated that in classical Hollywood cinema a plotline involving heterosexual romance figured in more than...

Romance

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The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
125 words

... , generic name applied to prose fiction that is conceived in terms of the fanciful and idealistic, rather than in terms of observation and faithful description of fact. In his preface to The House of the Seven Gables , Hawthorne states that a novel “is presumed to aim at a very minute fidelity, not merely to the possible, but to the probable and ordinary course of man's experience.” A romance, on the other hand, while it must keep to “the truth of the human heart—has fairly a right to present that truth under circumstances …of the writer's own choosing...

Romance

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The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
587 words

... , or novel; a work of fiction that in the ancient and Byz. world narrates, with some attention to the characters' psychological states, the hazards that a pair of lovers successfully face. The ancient romances (e.g., those of Achilles Tatius , Chariton , Heliodoros , Longus), composed between the 2nd and 4th C. by writers well versed in rhetorical techniques and read, it seems, by a broad spectrum of the literate public, maintained an intermittent readership in the Byz. period. Byz. readers interpreted ancient romances as metaphorical descriptions of...

Romance

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The Concise Oxford Companion to American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Literature
Length:
126 words

...Romance , generic name applied to prose fiction that is conceived in terms of the fanciful and idealistic, rather than in terms of observation and faithful description of fact. In his preface to The House of the Seven Gables , Hawthorne states that a novel “is presumed to aim at a very minute fidelity, not merely to the possible, but to the probable and ordinary course of man’s experience.” A romance, on the other hand, while it must keep to “the truth of the human heart—has fairly a right to present that truth under circumstances … of the writer’s own...

romance

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Martin Wiggins

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
515 words

... By the fifteenth century, English drama had appropriated the popular literary genre of chivalric romance as a source of narrative material. The action of such plays is rarely confined to a single location: rather they are loosely structured around travel through an exotic landscape, often pseudo-classical or pseudo-Mediterranean; sometimes the chronological limits are similarly wide, with generations passing in the space of the performance. The story often deals with a heroic knight's adventures, fighting giants and monsters, encountering enchanters,...

Romance

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The Oxford Companion to Italian Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
599 words

...of the French romance became increasingly complex, and the fictitious world which it created correspondingly self-contained. The romance is thus an exceptionally fluid genre, both in form (a variety of verse forms, or prose) and content; and there is a recognizable continuity between the medieval romance and its modern descendant, the novel , still called roman in French and romanzo in Italian. The first extended narrative fiction in Italian, in the first half of the 14th c., draws on all the main bodies of French material as well as on classical...

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