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rime riche

Subject: Literature

[reem reesh] A kind of rhyme (also called ‘identical rhyme’) in which the rhyming elements include matching consonants before the stressed vowel sounds. Often this means the ...

rime riche

rime riche   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... riche [ reem reesh ] A kind of rhyme (also called ‘identical rhyme’) in which the rhyming elements include matching consonants before the stressed vowel sounds. Often this means the rhyming of two words with the same sound and sometimes the same spelling but different meanings, e.g. seen/scene . The term also covers word-endings where the consonant preceding the stressed vowel sound is the same: com pare /des pair . An even more excessive kind of rhyme is rime très riche , in which not only the preceding consonant but also the vowel sound before that...

rime riche

rime riche  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
[reem reesh]A kind of rhyme (also called ‘identical rhyme’) in which the rhyming elements include matching consonants before the stressed vowel sounds. Often this means the rhyming of two words with ...
pararhyme

pararhyme   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...A rhyming effect produced by ‘rich’ consonance ( see rime riche ) without assonance: thus the consonantal sounds before and after the stressed vowels of a rhyming pair are matched while the vowel sounds are not, e.g. love/leave . This unusual variety of half-rhyme is found in various traditions of poetry, especially in Welsh, but in English it was re-invented in 1917 by Wilfred Owen for some of his war poems, notably ‘Strange Meeting’ ( 1918 ). The term was coined by Edmund Blunden in the introduction to his edition of The Poems of Wilfred...

rhyme

rhyme   Reference library

Chris Baldick

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...syllables (e.g. vi ewest /ren ewest —Sonnet 3), it is ‘feminine’. Rarer forms departing from ‘full rhyme’ include ‘half-rhyme’, in which the vowels do not match (d umb /t omb —Sonnet 101); ‘eye rhyme’, in which spellings match but sounds do not (c are / are —Sonnet 112); and ‘rime riche’, in which the preceding consonants also match ( press /ex press —Sonnet 140). Chris...

rhyme

rhyme   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...feminine or triple rhyme uses more than one word ( famous /sh ame us ), this is known as a ‘mosaic rhyme’. The rhyming pairs illustrated so far are all examples of ‘full rhyme’ (also called ‘perfect rhyme’ or ‘true rhyme’); departures from this norm take four main forms: (i) rime riche , in which the consonants preceding the rhyming elements are also identical, even if the spellings and meanings of the words differ ( made/maid ); (ii) eye rhyme , in which the spellings of the rhyming elements match, but the sounds do not (l ove /pr ove ); (iii) ...

Versification

Versification   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Literature in French

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
2,338 words
Illustration(s):
2

...between different degrees of rhyme ( pauvre, suffisante, riche ), and between masculine and feminine rhymes, and their attendant ‘tonalities’. In recent verse‐analysis a classification of degrees of rhyme according to the number of phonemes involved, regardless of whether they precede or succeed the tonic vowel—thus, rime pauvre (one phoneme, the tonic vowel: beauté ‖ aimé), rime suffisante (two phonemes: père ‖ frère), rime riche (three or more phonemes: rêve ‖ grève), rime léonine (two or more syllables: majestueuse ‖ fastueuse)—has...

rhyme

rhyme   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
425 words

...than one word makes up one of the rhymed pair of sounds in a feminine or triple rhyme (dreamy/see me), this is called ‘mosaic rhyme’. All the rhyming pairs illustrated here are examples of ‘full’ or ‘true’ rhyme, a norm from which various other forms deviate. These include rime riche , in which the consonants preceding the stressed syllable also match (veil/vale); ‘eye rhyme’, in which spellings match but pronunciation does not (bough/through); half-rhyme, in which the stressed vowel sounds do not match but the consonants (and sometimes unstressed...

rhyme

rhyme   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
431 words

...than one word makes up one of the rhymed pair of sounds in a feminine or triple rhyme (dreamy/see me), this is called ‘mosaic rhyme’. All the rhyming pairs illustrated here are examples of ‘full’ or ‘true’ rhyme, a norm from which various other forms deviate. These include rime riche , in which the consonants preceding the stressed syllable also match (veil/vale); ‘eye rhyme’, in which spellings match but pronunciation does not (bough/through); half-rhyme, in which the stressed vowel sounds do not match but the consonants (and sometimes unstressed...

versification

versification   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (early and medieval)
Length:
2,804 words
Illustration(s):
22

...These identical rhymes are sometimes called rimes riches : they are more common in French than in English verse. The following is a Chaucerian example, elegantly bridging within the couplet the transition to what in Hengwrt and Ellesmere is marked ¶: ‘Therfore I passe as lightly as I may. | ¶ It fil that in that seventhe yeer, of May’ (I.1461–2). Rimes riches often involve words with identical stems, but one of the pair having a prefix; for example, forbede / bede , biholde / holde . Very rarely rime riche involves a form of rhyme in which one rhyme...

Bibliography, Selected

Bibliography, Selected   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
54,714 words

...Felix (London 1917) [London 1971] Richardson, Samuel Clarissa (London 1748) [rev. edn 2 vols. London 1810] —— Memoirs of the Life of Lady H (London 1741) —— Pamela, or, Virtue Rewarded 2 vols. (London 1741) —— Sir Charles Grandison 6 vols. (London 1753) [London 1812] Riche, Barnabe His Farewell to Military Profession (London 1581) [facsimile Ottowa 1992] Richler, Mordechai The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz (London 1959) [London 1964] Richmond, Harry My Young Wife and I Songster (New York 1868) Ridley, Bromfield Lewis Battles and...

Rich Rhyme

Rich Rhyme   Reference library

T.V.F. Brogan and E. Rettberg

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

..., Petit traité de poésie française (1872) ; P. Delaporte , De la rime française (1898); Kastner; Schipper, History , 273; C. von Kraus , “Der rührende Reim im Mittelhochdeutschen,” ZDA 56 (1918); Patterson; M. Ito , John Gower the Medieval Poet (1976) ; C. Smith , “On Sound-Patterning in the Poema de mio Cid ,” Hispanic Review 44 (1976); Scott; Mazaleyrat; D. Billy , “La Nomenclature des Rimes,” Poétique 15 (1984) ; B. de Cornulier , “Rimeriche’ et fonction de la rime,” Littérature 59 (1985); Hollander; Scherr; C. Scott , The...

Rhyme

Rhyme   Reference library

T.V.F. Brogan, S. Cushman, K. S. Chang, R.M.A. Allen, W. L. Hanaway, and C. Scott

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
10,692 words

...vowel and phonemic material preceding it: (a) rhyme of tonic vowel alone: rime pauvre or faible (b) rhyme of vowel + following consonant(s): rime suffisante (c) rhyme of vowel + preceding consonant(s): rime riche (d) rhyme of vowel + preceding syllable(s): rime léonine Under (c), the homophony of the rhyme words’ consonne d’appui (the consonant immediately preceding the tonic vowel) was a condition of rime riche ( see rich rhyme ). The incidence of rime riche increased with the romantic poets and became an important plank in the aesthetic...

Refrain

Refrain   Reference library

S. Burt

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...a line repeated verbatim within a poem, esp. at ends of stanzas; in song, a burden or chorus (through the 16th c., also called refreit ); a structurally significant repetend separated by at least one line of nonrepeating material (hence distinguished, in Eur. poetics, from rime riche, anaphora , and epistrophe). Refrains may be as short as one word or longer than the longest nonrepeated stanza. They may dispense with paraphrasable meaning entirely or become units of independent sense whose changing implications comment on the rest of a poem; most refrains...

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