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radio

Subject: Literature

Originally developed by Nikola Tesla (1856–1943), Guglielmo Marconi (1874–1937), and others as ‘wireless telegraphy’, and first demonstrated publicly in Oxford in 1894. Early uses included ...

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A Dictionary of Nursing (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
9 words

...- combining form denoting 1. radiation. 2. radioactive...

radio-

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Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
9 words

...- combining form denoting 1. radiation. 2. radioactive...

radio

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A Dictionary of Media and Communication (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
85 words

... 1. The first electronic mass medium of communication , involving an audio signal broadcast wirelessly in the form of radio waves from a high-power transmitter to a low-power receiver ( radio set ). Radio shares many of its representational and institutional characteristics with television . See also live ; radio genres . 2. A means of interpersonal communication over short distances which uses transmitter/receiver devices that use a low-power half-duplex radio signal . http://genome.ch.bbc.co.uk/ BBC Radio Times archive ...

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A Dictionary of Electronics and Electrical Engineering (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...radio circuit, or radio link. 2. Short for radiofrequency. Denoting electromagnetic radiation in the radiofrequency range or any device, component, or other apparatus used to transmit or receive information at frequencies within this range, as in radio telephony, radio telemetry, or radio astronomy. 3. A radio receiver . ...

radio

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The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
166 words

... Originally developed by Nikola Tesla ( 1856–1943 ), Guglielmo Marconi ( 1874–1937 ), and others as ‘wireless telegraphy’, and first demonstrated publicly in Oxford in 1894 . Broadcast programmes began in many countries in the early 1920s. In Britain, the BBC became an important commissioner of talks, by such writers as E. M. Forster and J. B. Priestley , and of original radio drama. Ezra Pound 's pioneering radio opera The Testament of François Villon was transmitted by the BBC in 1931 , and W. H. Auden and Christopher Isherwood included...

Radio

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Kathy M. Newman

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
1,319 words

...development of radio in the United States hinged on the relationship between hardware (radio receivers) and software (radio programming). The Westinghouse corporation started one of the first American radio stations—KDKA in Pittsburgh—and it was also one of the first producers of radio receivers. Other stations had similar origins, such as WLS ( World's Largest Store ) in Chicago, which was founded by Sears, Roebuck, and WEAF in New York City, which was owned and operated by AT&T. Radio stations increased the demand for radio receivers by creating...

radio

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The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
241 words

...BBC in 1931 , and W. H. Auden and Christopher Isherwood included radio bulletins and songs in their experimental verse play The Ascent of F6 ( 1937 ). Working with Louis MacNeice and other writers, Dallas Bower ( 1907–99 ) would create a new form of epic radio drama in the 1940s, attuned to propaganda needs, which would lead to a post-war golden age of radio drama on the BBC's Third Programme, which broadcast Dylan Thomas 's Under Milk Wood ( 1954 ), and the inventive ‘radio ballads’ that began with Singing the Fishing in 1960 , produced by...

Radio

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Bruce Lenthall

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Social History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... Across the twentieth century, radio broadcasting transformed the ways in which Americans communicated with each other and understood their society. Radio connected Americans both with each other and with worlds beyond their doorsteps, and it amplified particular voices. The nature of those connections and of the voices on the airwaves fluctuated through the century and beyond. Origins, 1900 to 1927 . In radio’s earliest years, many of those most concerned with radio envisioned it as a wireless medium for point-to-point communication. Around the time of...

radio

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Douglas J. Allen

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
424 words

...the tone for radio in Britain over the next 40 years—a paternalistic diet of information and education, with some concessions to entertainment in the form of light musical and variety items. Challenges from the more populist fare of other radio stations—Radio Luxembourg from 1933 , American Forces Radio in the Second World War, and offshore pirate radio stations in the 1960s—brought gradual revision to programming policy. The biggest changes to British radio however came in the early 1970s with government legislation to permit commercial radio, under the name...

Radio

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Encyclopedia of African American History 1896 to the Present

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,725 words
Illustration(s):
1

...WOL to become a highly successful radio station. After obtaining his MBA degree from the University of Pennsylvania, Liggins joined his mother to help expand Radio One. In 1999 Liggins convinced Hughes that Radio One should become a publicly traded company. By 2008 , Radio One owned and/or operated seventy radio stations in over twenty urban markets in the country. Additionally, Radio One owned 51 percent of Reach Media, Inc., owner of the Tom Joyner Morning Show and other businesses associated with the leading radio personality Tom Joyner . Joyner's...

Radio

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The Oxford Companion to Australian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
889 words

...commercial stations, this meant that radio broadcasting was a profitable affair with none of the financial uncertainties of the 1920s and early 1930s. The high point of the radio listening week is dealt with in The Golden Age of Australian Radio Drama (1994) by Richard Lane . While there was limited overlap between press and radio ownership, the dominant force in commercial radio was nevertheless the large advertising agencies that controlled the airwaves on behalf of major clients, and frequently forced individual radio stations to act as network affiliates...

Radio

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Christopher H. Sterling

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Business, Labor, and Economic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Business and Management, Economics
Length:
1,555 words

...focused on radio's lifesaving role in such disasters as the 1912 Titanic sinking. Edwin Howard Armstrong, another key American inventor, patented several circuits widely used in radio receivers and fought lengthy patent battles with de Forest and others. Thousands of soldiers learned to use radio during World War I, but postwar development was slowed by the cancellation of government manufacturing contracts and by the fact that the patents needed to make radios were held by competing firms. Cooperation was imperative, and the Radio Corporation of...

Radio

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Goodman David

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Cultural and Intellectual History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

.... Radio was also expanding rapidly. There were 930 AM stations in 1945 ; by 1970 there were 4,292 AM and 2,597 FM stations—commercial FM began in 1941 , and this time frequencies were reserved for educational stations. Radio receivers became smaller and cheaper in the postwar era, and most households had several. Portable transistor radios transformed radio listening from the mid-1950s. Car radios became more important; drive time became radio's focus as evening prime time was increasingly ceded to television. The Age of Television. Radio networks...

Radio.

Radio.   Reference library

Christopher H. Sterling

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,423 words

..., Selling Radio: The Commercialization of American Broadcasting, 1920–1934 , 1994. Ray Barfield , Listening to Radio, 1920–1950 , 1996. Robert L. Hilliard and Michael C. Keith , The Broadcast Century: A Biography of American Broadcasting , 2d ed., 1997. Michele Hilmes , Radio Voices: American Broadcasting, 1922–1952 , 1997. John Dunning , On the Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio , 1998. Donald G. Godfrey and Frederic A. Leigh , Historical Dictionary of American Radio , 1998. Christopher H. Sterling , ed. Encyclopedia of Radio , 2001....

Radio

Radio   Reference library

Christopher H. Sterling

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the History of American Science, Medicine, and Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...The Radio Act of 1927 created the Federal Radio Commission to license stations “in the public interest” and provided industry stability, which encouraged national networking (interconnection) of stations (using telephone lines), which began at the same time. Many companies were developed to manufacture radio equipment and receivers. From its formation in 1919 well into the 1960s, the Radio Corporation of America (RCA) was dominant, manufacturing the whole range of radio equipment—vacuum tubes, transmitters, and receivers. Amplitude-modulated (AM) radio...

Radio

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The Oxford Companion to Italian Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
590 words

...for radio: the first purpose-written Italian radio play was Luigi Chiarelli 's L'anello di Teodosio , broadcast in 1929 . Pirandello 's Il piacere dell'onestà was broadcast in 1934 , despite his reservations about plays on radio. By the early 1930s the Fascist regime had come to recognize the potential of radio as a means of mass communication, and consequently exerted more direct control over schedules and programme content, subsidized sets for use in schools and other public places, and attempted to increase the penetration of radio in rural...

Radio

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John Holl

Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover’s Companion to New York City

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... There are dozens of commercial, public, community, Internet, and satellite radio stations broadcasting from the New York metropolitan area. The first broadcast in New York can be traced to 1907 , from an experimental station in the Parker Building then located on Fourth Avenue and Nineteenth Street. On both the AM and FM band, as well as through SiriusXM, the satellite radio service with studios in Manhattan, there is great diversity in content to be found over the airwaves. While it is not uncommon to hear chefs and other food experts on radio shows, few...

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
272 words

... Broadcasting or reception of electromagnetic radiation in the form of radio waves. A transmitter generates a radio signal of fixed frequency (the carrier wave). A microphone converts the sound to be broadcast into a varying electrical signal that combines with the carrier by means of modulation . Frequency modulation ( FM ) minimizes interference and provides greater fidelity than amplitude modulation ( AM ) (varying the frequency or amplitude of the carrier). The modulated carrier wave passes to an aerial , which transmits it into the...

radio

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Everett Frost, Everett Frost, Everett Frost, Everett Frost, Everett Frost, and Everett Frost

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
6,144 words

...than selling radio sets. Thus began the sponsorship of radio programmes or commercial broadcast, the dominant form of radio in the United States. In Europe similar experimentation was severely inhibited by the First World War. Radio broadcasting was taken over by the various militaries, and private broadcasting (with its obvious potential for breaching security) was forbidden. After the war radio expanded rapidly in Europe, with significant inroads into Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Like the invention itself, the development of radio proceeded most...

radio

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The Oxford Companion to Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...period, smaller, more robust radio sets, some with crystal tuning, were developed. This meant that vehicles and aircraft could be equipped with radios, giving both the army and air force true mobile radio communications. It was quickly appreciated that voice radio was the only realistic way to control large numbers of personnel and vehicles. Higher frequencies were developed which improved reception. The armoured warfare of WW II would have been impossible without the installation of lightweight and reliable radios in the majority of fighting...

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