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Overview

print culture

A conceptual term that identifies the distinct cultural impact made by print technology. The term was popularized by McLuhan, who believed that print culture exemplifies the triumph of the ...

print culture

print culture   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
204 words

...qualities within print itself, instead arguing that print culture is constructed by the complex social networks of the medium’s users. Theorists of print culture emphasize print’s revolutionary nature, thus assuming that new technologies displace old ones. From the 1990s onward, however, interest in early modern *manuscript culture has complicated this belief in technological displacement, and scholars such as *Love have stressed the interactions among media rather than the separation and homogeneity of media-defined cultures. Stephen Karian E. L....

Print Culture

Print Culture   Reference library

Calhoun Winton

The Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of the American Enlightenment

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...in that colony and in New Jersey. Among other things, he printed there a prayer book in Algonquian ( 1715 ) for the use of Church of England missionaries in the wilderness. Thus print culture, quite unwittingly, had worked for the extension of religious variety and against the domination of opinion by one denomination. Another enlightening influence of print culture derived from books and other printed materials that the colonists brought with them. Like the press itself, printed materials were relatively heavy and represented a significant choice...

Print Culture

Print Culture   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Enlightenment

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945)
Length:
2,546 words

... Culture . In all countries of Enlightenment Europe, three markets for books constituted the world of “print culture”: the market for new titles, that for littérature du colportage (chapbooks), and that for the works collected by bibliophiles. Each implied a particular form of book sales (the librairie d'assortiment , traveling peddlers, and public sales), specific repertories (the bookseller-publisher's selections and editions, “popular” collections, collector's books), and the differing expectations and potentials of the printed book. The growth of...

Print Culture

Print Culture   Reference library

Scott E. Casper and Joan Shelley Rubin

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Cultural and Intellectual History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...American History and Culture, 1997. Learned and popular cultures of print and manuscript in the eighteenth century: how interaction with reading and writing helped shape modes of civility. Soltow, Lee , and Edward Stevens . The Rise of Literacy and the Common School in the United States: A Socioeconomic Analysis to 1870 . Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981. Sweet, Leonard I. , ed. Communication and Change in American Religious History . Grand Rapids, Mich.: W. B. Eerdmans, 1993. Essays on American religious print culture and media. Tebbel, John ....

Bibles and Tracts in Print Culture in America

Bibles and Tracts in Print Culture in America   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Religion in America

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Religion
Length:
9,106 words

...and Tracts in Print Culture in America The history of print culture and religion in the United States can be told through several of the most important kinds of print publication that religious groups and individuals used. Polemical and catechetical religious works, but also the Bible translated for missions work, were commonly issued from colonial presses. The early 19th century saw the rise of two major religious institutions, each with its own characteristic form of religious literature. The American Tract Society and similar publishers raised the...

Late 19th-Century Periodical Print Culture in the US-Mexico Border Region

Late 19th-Century Periodical Print Culture in the US-Mexico Border Region   Reference library

Donna M. Kabalen de Bichara

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latina and Latino Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...of Popular Print Culture, 1860–1920 , Kirsten Silva Gruesz’s “Mexican / American: The Making of Borderlands Print Culture” contributes information related to the history of the Spanish-language press in the border region of the United States. The collection of articles in El Periodismo en México: 450 Años de Historia , 74 edited by Salvador Novo, includes pieces by three specialists in the field: María del Carmen Ruíz Castañeda, Luis Reed Torres, and Enrique Cordereo y Torres. This invaluable source reviews the history of periodical print culture beginning...

The History of Latin American Print Culture in the Colonial Period: 16th and 17th Centuries

The History of Latin American Print Culture in the Colonial Period: 16th and 17th Centuries   Reference library

Blanca López de Mariscal

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latina and Latino Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Literature, Literary texts, Literary theory and cultural studies
Length:
14,428 words
Illustration(s):
12

...in the world.” This overview suggests that print culture is a subject that demands study from an interdisciplinary approach and that reading practices are very similar in the viceroyalties of both New Spain and Peru. The books that circulated and those that were published focused on multiple recipients, from the indigenous population to the highest scholarly levels. Printed texts were presented in a wide range of languages that coexisted with Castilian. This study highlights the complex world of print culture in which all types of booksellers and publishers...

Print Culture and Censorship from Colonial Latin America to the US Latina/o Presence in the 19TH Century

Print Culture and Censorship from Colonial Latin America to the US Latina/o Presence in the 19TH Century   Reference library

Matthew J. K.Hill

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latina and Latino Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Literature, Literary texts, Literary theory and cultural studies
Length:
30,368 words
Illustration(s):
9

...in the Latin American colonial context, prior to the existence of the United States. But what is print culture? The term “print culture” refers to the production, distribution, reception, and use of printed material. 3 Print culture is related to but distinct from a culture of writing in that print culture specifically denotes the use of those items created with the typographical press or related technologies such as xylography (woodcut printing), lithography, or other graphic arts. In contrast with the latter technologies, which are designed primarily...

The History of Latin American Print Culture: 18th and Early 19th Centuries (Censorship and Public Sphere Before and After Independence War)

The History of Latin American Print Culture: 18th and Early 19th Centuries (Censorship and Public Sphere Before and After Independence War)   Reference library

Dalia Valdez Garza

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latina and Latino Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...(Summer 1982): 67; See the recovery Barbara Leckie makes of ideas “prácticas” (“practices”) and “representaciones” (“representations”) for Chartier on pp. 896 and 901 and their ties to what he develops as the concept of “print culture” in the article “ On Print Culture: Mediatio, Practice, Politics, Knowledge ,” Victorian Literature and Culture 43, no. 4 (2015): 895–907; see Roger Chartier, “ Du livre au lire ,” Sociologie de la communication 1, no. 1 (1997), 271–290. 53. See Sarah Elizabeth Luck et al., “ The Book: Production and Participation ,” ...

print culture

print culture  

A conceptual term that identifies the distinct cultural impact made by print technology. The term was popularized by McLuhan, who believed that print culture exemplifies the triumph of the visual ...
14 Printed Ephemera

14 Printed Ephemera   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
7,034 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...distinct on the shelf, is itself an inherently insecure component of *print culture . The book as a form is usually placed at the top of a hierarchy of print, standing at the pinnacle of a pyramid of output that broadens out to the flat base of printed ephemera. However, this seems less than realistic, given the ephemeral nature of many books ( see survival rates ); moreover, their own boundaries with other forms are often insecure, blurring and fading over time. Within print culture, there has been a continuous process of reassessment, which (mainly...

36 The History of the Book in the Balkans

36 The History of the Book in the Balkans   Reference library

Aleksandra B. Vraneš

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
3,947 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...lost in the 18 th century. Christian Orthodox, Latin, and oriental cultures influenced Romania’s culture. Tîrgovişte and Braşov became noteworthy centres for early Cyrillic and Romanian printing. The Romanian language finally established itself as part of written culture in the 17 th century. The first collection of laws printed in Wallachia, the Pravila de la Govora , appeared at Govora in 1640 . Other printing centres of note were Iaşi, where *Varlaam ’s Cazania was printed; Alba Iulia (the Bălgrad New Testament, 1648 ), and Bucharest (the first...

42 The History of the Book in Japan

42 The History of the Book in Japan   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
8,089 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
4

...History of the Book in Japan P. F. Kornicki 1 Scribal culture 2 Print up to 1600 3 Print 1600–1868 4 Print since 1868 1 Scribal culture Japan first became acquainted with both writing and the book from China, at some time in the first half of the first millennium ad . There can be no doubt that Chinese, as the language of Buddhism in East Asia, as the language of the intellectual tradition that is now termed Confucianism, and as the language of scholarly discourse in East Asia, was central to book production in Japan from its beginnings right up to...

37 The History of the Book in Sub-Saharan Africa

37 The History of the Book in Sub-Saharan Africa   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
5,157 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...Amharic MSS were printed. In 1922 , the Berhanena Selam Printing Press began publishing Amharic school texts locally. Soon, the power of the press superseded that of the continent’s oldest surviving scribal culture. 2 The impact of slavery and evangelism Seminal ‘movements’ in the development of African *print cultures include slavery, and the forces that opposed and finally achieved its abolition—Christian evangelism, and the mission-facilitated literacy it spread across broad swathes of the continent ( see 9 ). The arrival of print and the book...

45 The History of the Book in New Zealand

45 The History of the Book in New Zealand   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
3,017 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...print heritage despite its geographic isolation. From 1848 , would-be colonists could peruse E. J. Wakefield ’s Hand-Book for New Zealand for a recommended list of books on practical topics such as cooking, ornithology, and astronomy. Early settlers, conscious of a non-literate aboriginal population far larger than their own, deliberately recorded their efforts to establish a local *print culture . Jim Traue, a former chief librarian of the *Turnbull Library , has argued for two histories (aboriginal and colonial) of New Zealand print culture and...

39 The History of the Book in the Indian Subcontinent

39 The History of the Book in the Indian Subcontinent   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
10,044 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...up printing presses. Consequently, a commercial print culture in western India first developed in Gujarati, rather than in Marathi. Veena Naregal has suggested that the slow growth of a Marathi print culture was largely due to high-caste repugnance towards the manual labour associated with the print trade. In the mid-19 th century, two men changed the face of Marathi printing. In 1840 , Gaṇpat Kṛsṇājī built a wooden hand press and started experimenting with ink-making and type design. In order to print the Hindu almanacs that were his stock-in-trade, he...

6 The European Printing Revolution

6 The European Printing Revolution   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,082 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...by later scholars (especially in the case of Eisenstein by Needham [review], Grafton , and Johns ). Although many bibliographers and book historians now understand printed texts and MSS as coexisting, and even sometimes having a mutually complementary relationship—especially during the *incunable period —it is a fact that within a generation the role of the MS book and of *manuscript culture was fundamentally changed. The continuing existence of MS publication, in certain fields, is a historical phenomenon amply documented by *Love ( see 13 ). 2 MS...

33 The History of the Book in Poland

33 The History of the Book in Poland   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
4,081 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...also marketed Polish books abroad through firms in Amsterdam, Paris, and Berlin, and presented translations of Polish writers at the *Leipzig *book fair . 5 Book culture in partitioned Poland After 1795 , when Poland ceased to be a sovereign state and was partitioned between Russia, Prussia, and Austria, the fate of the Polish book was subject to the vagaries of the occupying powers. The printed word became a force that united Poles living in the tripartite partition with their fellow countrymen who sought asylum abroad, and kept a Polish national identity...

9 Missionary Printing

9 Missionary Printing   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
4,077 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...new lands but also to spread their faith. From *Gutenberg they had learned the power of the printed word, and were determined to use this revolutionary new technology to Christianize Asia. The impact of these efforts varied depending on a number of circumstances. The two most significant variables were the ability to wield control as a colonial power (e.g. in the Philippines, but not in Japan or China) and the pre-existence of a widespread *print culture (e.g. in China), or lack thereof (e.g. in India and Malaya). This summary account of missionary...

40 The History of the Book in China

40 The History of the Book in China   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
8,923 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
3

...M. Heijdra , ‘Technology, Culture and Economics: Movable Type Versus Woodblock Printing in East Asia’, in Studies of Publishing Culture in East Asia , ed. A. Isobe (2004) P. Hu , Visible Traces (2000) International Dunhuang Project , www.idp.bl.uk , consulted Dec. 2007 J. McDermott , A Social History of the Chinese Book (2006) [ Nihon Shoshi Gakkai (Japan Bibliographical Society) ,] Naikaku Bunko sôhon shoei (Illustrations of Song Editions in the Naikaku Bunko Library) (1984) C. Reed , Gutenberg in Shanghai: Chinese Print Capitalism, 1876–1937 ...

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