You are looking at 1-20 of 16,467 entries  for:

clear all

Did you mean Ports Ports

View:

Overview

port

Subject: History

Any port in a storm in adverse circumstances any source of relief or escape is welcome; saying recorded from the mid 18th century. port of call a place where a ship stops on a ...

port

port   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Mechanical Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...port An opening in an engine, a compressor, a pump, a hydraulic cylinder , etc. through which fluid enters (an inlet port ) or leaves (an outlet port ), usually controlled by a...

Port

Port   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...dark red wine gets its name from Oporto, Portugal (which is again Latin portus ), and ‘port’, the way of bearing oneself, is from Latin portare , ‘to carry’. Any port in a storm See under any . Cinque Ports See under cinque . College port See under college . Crusted port See under crust . On the port or starboard bow Within 45 degrees to the port or starboard of straight...

port

port   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Travel and Tourism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
15 words

... The left-hand side (facing forwards) of a ship. The word also generally means...

port

port   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...by long maturation into port. Hence in early years it was frequently called Oporto wine , or simply Oporto or porto (still the French term), or port wine , or—the version which finally won out— port . There are several styles of port. The simplest and cheapest is ruby port —the port of ‘port and lemon’, a pub drink once with a rather louche reputation—which is bottled for immediate consumption after only a very brief maturation in barrel, and whose colour, as its name suggests, is the prototypical deep crimson of port. Port that is kept longer in...

port

port 2 n.   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... 2 n. the side of a ship or aircraft that is on the left when one is facing forward: the ferry was listing to port | the port side of the aircraft. The opposite of starboard . v. turn (a ship or its helm) to port...

port

port 4 v.   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... 4 v. carry (a rifle or other weapon) diagonally across and close to the body with the barrel or blade near the left shoulder: Detail! For inspection—port arms! n. the position required by an order to port a rifle or other weapon: Parker had his rifle at the port . at port arms in the position adopted when given a command to port one's...

port

port   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Computer Science (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... 1. (I/O port) A connection point with associated control circuitry that allows I/O devices to be connected to the internal bus of a microprocessor. See also parallel port , serial port , communication port . 2. A point through which data can enter or leave a network , either on the network or the DTE (computer) interface. 3. To move software from one type of computer system to another, making any necessary changes en route. In a simple case little more than recompilation may be required, while in extreme cases the software might have to be...

port

port 1 n.   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... 1 n. 1 a town or city with a harbor where ships load or unload, especially one where customs officers are stationed. 2 a harbor: the port has miles of docks | an abundant water supply and port facilities. 3 (also inland port ) an inland town or city whose connection to the coast by a river or other body of water enables it to act as a port...

port

port   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law Enforcement (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Law
Length:
86 words

... A place or town with access to the sea to which ships may conveniently come and at which they may load and unload. Under the Customs and Excise Management Act 1979 a port for the purposes of the Act means any port defined as such by the Commissioners for Revenue and Customs . The Commissioners also determine the ‘limits of a port’ and have done so in such a way that the entire coast of the UK is within the limits of a port...

port

port   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law (9 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
63 words

...port n. A place or town with access to the sea to which ships may conveniently come and at which they may load and unload. In charterparties and marine insurance policies, the word is construed in this commercial sense, as understood in the shipping business. For pilotage or revenue purposes, a port may extend over a larger geographical area than the commercial port...

port

port   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Electronics and Electrical Engineering (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... An access point in an electronic circuit, device, network, or other apparatus where signals can be input or output or where the variables of the system may be observed or measured. See also two-port network . ...

port

port   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
80 words

... . 1 The place-name can mean either harbour, market town, or gate. 2 The Exchequer port books, housed at the Public Record Office under E 190, are an important source for the history of local overseas trade and of coastal traffic in the early modern period. They survive in large numbers for many ports for the period 1565–1799 , though there are gaps in the Civil War and Commonwealth and for some ports the records cease in the mid-18th...

port

port   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Chemical Engineering

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...port An access point to a process vessel and used for instrument probes and transfer lines, etc. ...

port

port 3 n.   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... 3 n. 1 a gunport. 2 a porthole. 3 an opening in the side of a ship for boarding or...

port

port   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
227 words

...in his Seaman's Dictionary ( 1625 ), indicates the use of the word for helm orders some 200 years earlier, and had: ‘Port. Is a word used in conding [ see con ] the Ship … they will use the word steddy a-port, or steddy a- starboard .’ The theory that the word port was chosen to replace larboard because a vessel burns a red light—the colour of port wine—at night on its left-hand side is demonstrably false, as the word port was used in this connection long before ships burned navigation lights at night. 2 A harbour with facilities for berthing...

port

port   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
471 words

... 1 The place‐name can mean either harbour, market town, or gate. 2 The Exchequer port books, housed at The National Archives in E 190, are an important source for the history of local overseas trade and of coastal traffic in the early modern period ( see docks, dockyards ; river traffic ). They survive in large numbers for many ports for the period 1565–1799 , though there are gaps in the Civil War and Commonwealth , and for some ports the records cease in the mid‐18th century. For a list of head ports and their subordinate ports, see N. J....

port

port   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
59 words

... Fortified wine produced in the Douro Valley, n Portugal. It may be white, tawny (translucent brown) or red, and contains 17–20% alcohol. A vintage port ages in oak casks for 15 to 20 years. From the 17th to the early 20th centuries, manufacture relied on trade with Britain, using ships sailing from Oporto on the Douro...

port

port   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
58 words

... [Ge] 1 Generally taken as a settlement situated on a river or coast whose occupants were engaged in water‐borne trade, commerce, and industry, including fishing. 2 In early medieval England a port was also a specialized kind of market town at which tolls could be collected and which was not necessarily on a river or the...

port

port   Quick reference

A Dictionary of the Internet (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

... A logical concept rather than a hardware concept. It represents a way of identifying a conduit through which data can flow into and out of a...

port

port   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
80 words

... A coastal or inland location with a harbour where people and cargo can be transferred between land and boats. The location provides shelter from storms and optimal access to fishing grounds, shipping routes, and markets. Given their importance to international trade, many ports have become the focal points around which large cities have developed. Deep water ports are key nodes in international flows of goods, able to handle the largest of ships. See also containerization ; gateway city ; transport geography...

View: