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pons Mulvius

Carried the via Flaminia across the Tiber north of Rome; it is first mentioned in 207 bc. The existing bridge, the modern Ponte Milvio, was first built by M. Aemilius ...

pons Mulvius

pons Mulvius   Reference library

Ian Archibald Richmond, Donald Emrys Strong, and John Robert Patterson

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
147 words

... Mulvius carried the via Flaminia across the Tiber north of Rome; it is first mentioned in 207 bc . The existing bridge, the modern Ponte Milvio , was first built by M. Aemilius Scaurus (1) in 109 bc and there has been much later rebuilding. Of the four main 18-m. (60 ft.) arches, only the southern pair are ancient. Above the pointed cutwaters, both up- and downstream, there are arched flood-passages. The road makes a sloping approach on either side. The Allobroges were trapped here during the Catilinarian conspiracy in 63 bc ( see sergius...

pons Mulvius

pons Mulvius  

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Overview Page
Carried the via Flaminia across the Tiber north of Rome; it is first mentioned in 207 bc. The existing bridge, the modern Ponte Milvio, was first built by M. Aemilius ...
Milvian bridge

Milvian bridge   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
20 words

...bridge ( Pons Mulvius ) Near Rome, site of a battle in ad 312 when the emperor Constantine I defeated...

Milvian Bridge, Battle of

Milvian Bridge, Battle of   Reference library

Jon Coulston

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...I finally defeated and killed Maxentius so becoming sole ruler of Italy and Africa as well as Britain , Gaul , and Spain . After two victories in northern Italy Constantine overcame Maxentian forces again at Saxa Rubra on the Via Flaminia. Maxentius cut the Pons Mulvius but then faced Constantine on the right bank of the Tiber, having prepared a pontoon bridge in case he needed to withdraw back to the city. In the event, he was forced to do precisely this, but the temporary bridge collapsed, drowning Maxentius and many of his soldiers (...

bridges

bridges   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
382 words

...uncertain whether any surviving example of a stone bridge with true arches dates from before the Roman period. The wooden bridge is associated with the very existence of Rome, but the stone bridge is a late development, the earliest dated example being the pons Aemilius of 179 bc , followed by pons Mulvius in 109 . Typical of the state of affairs outside Rome is the statement of Augustus ( Res Gestae 20.5): ‘I repaired the via Flaminia …and all the bridges on it except the Mulvian and Minucian.’ Nearly all monumental bridges belong to the imperial age. In...

Caesar, (Gaius) Julius

Caesar, (Gaius) Julius (13 July ?102 bc)   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Classical Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Classical studies
Length:
353 words

... Julia, whose cult statue was by the sculptor Arkesilaos . The middle of the court was dominated by an equestrian statue of Caesar (now lost). A plan for the development of the city, possibly drawn up by an Athenian architect, called for a diversion of the Tiber from the Pons Mulvius (now Ponte Milvio ) to the foot of the Vatican hills, and for the building of the Campus Martius. The Campus Vaticanus was to be used for the military functions of the Campus Martius. The death of Caesar forestalled the realization of many of these works, but his...

Maxentius (RE 1), Marcus Aurelius Valerius

Maxentius (RE 1), Marcus Aurelius Valerius (b. c.ad 283)   Reference library

Raymond Peter Davis

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
366 words

...Constantine to sever his alliance with both men and ( 312 ) invade Italy. He killed Maxentius's prefect near Verona , marched on Rome and defeated Maxentius's forces (said to have been four times as numerous) at Saxa Rubra; Maxentius was drowned near the Mulvian bridge ( pons Mulvius ). He may have been no soldier, and his need for cash caused resentment among senators, but Constantinian propaganda gives a wholly misleading impression of him. He constructed a new basilica in the Roman Forum, later annexed by Constantine, along with other buildings and used...

Maximian

Maximian   Reference library

Raymond Peter Davis

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
505 words

...assumed the purple for the third time, but was quickly captured at Massilia ( see Massalia ) and died by his own hand ( c. July 310). Proclaimed Divus by Maxentius and the senate, his memory was damned ( see damnatio memoriae ) by Constantine; after the Mulvian bridge ( pons Mulvius ) his widow Eutropia swore that Maxentius had not been his son, and he was rehabilitated. See bibliog. under diocletian . Raymond Peter...

bridges

bridges   Reference library

Richard Allan Tomlinson

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
753 words

...built structures in stone being in fact Roman. For, while the wooden bridge is associated with the very existence of Rome, the stone bridge is a relatively late development, the earliest dated example being the pons Aemilius (Livy 40. 51. 4) of 179 bc , given an arched superstructure in 142 bc , and followed by pons Mulvius in 109 bc , and pons Fabricius in 62 bc . Typical of the state of affairs outside Rome is Strabo's description (4. 1. 12) of the Narbonese via Domitia or the statement of Augustus ( RG 20. 5): ‘I repaired the via Flaminia and...

Constantine I

Constantine I   Quick reference

Raymond Peter Davis

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,953 words

... looked for support to Maxentius , Constantine looked to Licinius . In 312 Constantine invaded Italy. Victorious over Maxentius's northern forces near Turin and Verona, he marched on Rome. Maxentius gave battle at Saxa Rubra, was defeated, and was drowned near the pons Mulvius. The senate welcomed Constantine as liberator and made him, not Maximin, senior Augustus. He took over the rule of Italy and Africa, and disbanded the praetorian guard which had supported Maxentius. Two years earlier it had been given out that Constantine had seen a vision of...

Constantine I

Constantine I (272)   Reference library

Raymond Peter Davis

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,996 words
Illustration(s):
1

...as Maximinus looked for support to Maxentius, Constantine looked to Licinius. In 312 Constantine invaded Italy. Victorious over Maxentius’s northern forces near Turin and Verona, he marched on Rome. Maxentius gave battle at Saxa Rubra, was defeated, and was drowned near the pons Mulvius, the Mulvian Bridge across the Tiber. The senate welcomed Constantine as liberator and made him, not Maximinus, senior Augustus. He took over the rule of Italy and Africa, and disbanded the praetorian guard which had supported Maxentius. Two years earlier it had been given out...

Constantine I, ‘the Great’

Constantine I, ‘the Great’   Reference library

Raymond Peter Davis

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
2,077 words

...as Maximinus looked for support to Maxentius, Constantine looked to Licinius. In 312 Constantine invaded Italy. Victorious over Maxentius's northern forces near Turin and Verona, he marched on Rome. Maxentius gave battle at Saxa Rubra, was defeated, and was drowned near the pons Mulvius . The senate welcomed Constantine as liberator and made him, not Maximinus, senior Augustus. He took over the rule of Italy and Africa, and disbanded the praetorian guard which had supported Maxentius. Two years earlier it had been given out that Constantine had seen a vision...

Roman architecture

Roman architecture   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
1,983 words

...e.g. aqueducts (good examples include the Pont du Gard , Nîmes ( ad C1—which carried the aqueduct and road over the river-gorge), and the Aqua Claudia , Rome ( ad 38–52—with its Sublime array of arches springing from massive stone piers )) and bridges (e.g. the Pons Mulvius ( c. 109 bc— which crosses the Tiber near Rome and carries the Via Flaminia )). Such a command of structure also enabled multi-storey apartment-blocks ( insulae ) to be built, with identical floor-plans throughout, and fire-resistant construction of brick with concrete...

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