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phratry

In Greek states, groups with hereditary membership and probably normally associated with specific locality(ies). The members were ‘phrateres’, related to words which in other Indo‐European ...

Phratry

Phratry   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
552 words

...woman was received into her husband's phratry. It is unclear how great a role kinship played in the phratry. Certainly many members were related, and the genos or clan was a subset of the phratry. Phratries also appear to have been locally based. Phratries were self-governing bodies, with an annually elected leader (the phratriarch), and several phratry laws have survived—from the Demotionidae at Decelea in Attica and from the Labyadae at Delphi; both have to do with the religious duties or the festivals of the phratries. [ See also Clubs and Associations,...

phratry

phratry   Reference library

Dictionary of the Social Sciences

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
57 words

... A form of organization or relation between a group of clans or other nominally related kinship groups. Phratry often revolves around a common narrative of origins, such as a claim of descent from a common ancestor, as among some extended tribal societies. The term was introduced into anthropology in the nineteenth century by Lewis Henry Morgan...

phratry

phratry   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Sociology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
193 words

... In many pre-industrial societies, social organization is based on kinship groups through descent in either the male or female line, but these kinship groups are then aggregated according to non-kinship principles into larger groups which (in some cases) the anthropologist Lewis H. Morgan termed ‘phratries’. Examples include several American Indian and Australian Aboriginal tribes. In other societies, extended kinship groups include the clan (usually a matrilineal descent group), and gens (patrilineal descent group). It is now common to designate as...

phratry

phratry noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
46 words
phratry

phratry noun   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
46 words
phratry

phratry  

Reference type:
Overview Page
In Greek states, groups with hereditary membership and probably normally associated with specific locality(ies). The members were ‘phrateres’, related to words which in other Indo‐European languages ...
phratries

phratries   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
480 words

...demes of women, who, while not normally regarded as phratry members, might sometimes be introduced to their fathers' phratries and were presented to their husbands' phratries at the gamēlia . While phratries might pursue common activities throughout the year, phratry admissions normally took place at the Apaturia, at which there was also religious observance, esp. cult of Zeus Phratrios and Athena Phratria , feasting and competitions. Phratries could own property, which provided a source of income to support cultic and other activities and for loans to...

phratries

phratries (‘brotherhoods’])   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
127 words

... [Gk. phratriai , ‘brotherhoods’] In many Greek cities, groups of related families or clans ( see genos ). Before the reforms of Cleisthenes (2) at Athens political power was based on family groups. The four original tribes were subdivided into phratries, membership of which probably qualified a man for Athenian citizenship and for having a political voice. After Cleisthenes citizenship depended upon membership of a deme and the phratries lost their political significance in Athens. They continued to exist but with only social and religious...

phratries

phratries   Reference library

Stephen D. Lambert

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,095 words

...male. The phratries seem to have taken greater account than the demes of women, who, while not normally regarded as phratry members, might sometimes be introduced to their fathers' phratries and were presented to their husbands' phratries at the gamelia . While phratries might pursue common activities throughout the year, phratry admissions normally took place at the annual phratry festival, Apaturia , at which there was also religious observance, especially cult of Zeus Phratrios and Athena Phratria, feasting and e.g. competitions. Phratries could own...

Apaturia

Apaturia  

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An Ionian festival. Acc. to Herodotus, Ionians are all those who ‘derive from Athens and celebrate the festival Apaturia. All Ionians celebrate it except Ephesians and Colophonians.’ Almost all ...
genos

genos  

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The word genos was widely and variously used in Greek of all periods to denote ‘species’, ‘genus’, ‘sort’, ‘category’, ‘birth’, ‘kin’, ‘race’, ‘lineage’, ‘family’, ‘generation’, ‘posterity’, etc. ...
Camarina

Camarina  

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A Syracusan (see Syracuse) colony founded c.599 bc at the mouth of the river Hipparis in southern Sicily, near modern Scoglitti. Its mid-6th cent. fortifications enclose a vast area of ...
Carnea

Carnea  

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The main festival of the Dorians, honouring Apollo Carneius. At Sparta it took place in late summer and lasted nine days. It was above all a choral and musical festival of panhellenic importance.
Decelea

Decelea  

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A small Attic deme with its centre at Tatoi in the foothills of Mt. Parnes and extensive views over the Attic plain. It is included in Philochorus' list of twelve ...
patrōoi theoi

patrōoi theoi  

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(πατρῳ̑οι θεοί), literally ‘gods associated with a father’, hence commonly ‘ancestral’ or ‘inherited gods’. There is a clear similarity between the use of the epithet here and in phrases such ...
thiasos

thiasos  

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(θίασος), a group of worshippers of a god. Permanent thiasoi are attested epigraphically from the Hellenistic period in much of the Greek world: they are associations centred, at least in ...
orgeōnes

orgeōnes  

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(ὄργεω̑νες) are members of a society devoted to the rites (ὄργια) of a particular hero or god; they are in effect confined to Attica. A group of orgeōnes was an ...
trittyes

trittyes  

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(‘thirds’), divisions both of the four old and of the ten new tribes at Athens. Little is known of the old trittyes; an ancient guess that they were identical with ...
phylai

phylai  

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The Greek word phyle, usually but misleadingly translated ‘tribe’, was widely but not universally used in the Greek world to denote the principal components or divisions of the citizen body. ...
Apellai

Apellai  

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Was a monthly festival of Apollo held at Sparta and elsewhere. On this day the stated meetings of the Spartan assembly (see ekklesia) were held. The assembly comprised all Spartiate male citizens in ...

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