You are looking at 1-16 of 16 entries  for:

  • Public Health and Epidemiology x
clear all

View:

Overview

p20

1. p20-ARC One of the subunits of ARP2/3. 2. p20-CGGBP (CGG-binding protein1) A protein that binds to the unmethylated form of the trinucleotide repeat ...

deadly nightshade

deadly nightshade  

The common garden plant Atropa belladonna, the flowers of which contain hyoscine and scopolamine, two drugs that in overdoses cause flushing, dilated pupils, rapid heart rate, hallucinations, coma, ...
smoking

smoking  

Unqualified, this word refers to tobacco smoking, which became popular and socially acceptable among European and American men in the 18th and 19th centuries. During and after World War I, cigarette ...
prevention

prevention  

Policies and actions to eliminate a disease or minimize its effect; to reduce the incidence and/por prevalence of disease, disability, and premature death; to reduce the prevalence of disease ...
endocrine system

endocrine system  

In vertebrates, the system of ductless glands which secrete into the blood stream hormones which act on a target elsewhere in the body. See also pituitary ...
syndrome

syndrome  

(sin-drohm)a combination of signs and/or symptoms that forms a distinct clinical picture indicative of a particular disorder.
pharmaceutical

pharmaceutical  

Syn: drugs. A class of manufactured chemicals with medicinal properties. Some, including digitalis, quinine, morphine, are purified chemical extracts of naturally occurring traditional herbal ...
index case

index case  

The initial case in a communicable disease outbreak that spreads person to person. In genetics, the propositus, i.e., the individual whose condition first draws attention to a genetic trait.
SARS

SARS  

(severe acquired respiratory syndrome)an atypical pneumonia caused by a virus, SARS coronavirus (SARS CoV), that first appeared in November 2002 in China and subsequently spread to more than 20 ...
carcinogenesis

carcinogenesis  

(kar-sin-oh-jen-ĕ-sis)the evolution of an invasive cancer cell from a normal cell, a process resulting from successive genetic mutations caused by carcinogens.
quarantine

quarantine  

(kwo-răn-teen)the period for which a person (or animal) is kept in isolation to prevent the spread of a contagious disease. Different diseases have different quarantine periods.
Proportion

Proportion   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Epidemiology (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...Proportion A type of Ratio in which the numerator is included in the denominator. The ratio of a part to the whole, expressed as a “decimal fraction” (e.g., 0.2), as a “common fraction” (1/5), or as a Percentage (20%). By definition, a proportion (p) must be in the range (decimal) 0.0 ≤ p ≤ 1.0. Since numerator and denominator have the same dimension, any dimensional contents cancel out, and a proportion is a dimensionless quantity. Where numerator and denominator are based on counts rather than measurements, the originals are also...

Frequentist Statistics

Frequentist Statistics   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Epidemiology (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...Frequentist Statistics The most common type of statistical method during the 20th century and continuing today. Called frequentist to reflect the fact that the probability statements in the models it uses, and in the inferences it produces, refer to the relative frequencies of observations or data under different possibilities for or hypotheses about the underlying parameters under study (such as exposure effects). The most prominent examples are p Values and Confidence Intervals . A procedure is sometimes said to be properly calibrated or ...

spurious correlation

spurious correlation   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...spurious correlation ( nonsense correlation ) A relation between two variables that is statistically significant but lacks biological, clinical, social, or other plausibility. If statistical significance is accepted at the level of 5% (i.e., p <0.05), one in 20 correlations will be “statistically significant” by the operation of chance alone. See also correlation, nonsense . ...

statistical significance

statistical significance   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...it is statistically significant. In the biological and medical sciences and in clinical epidemiology, it is a matter of judgment, but events that would be unlikely to occur by chance more than once in 20 times (i.e., with a probability p <0.05) are often accepted as statistically significant. A more rigorous test requires a probability of less than 1 in 100 ( p <0.01). See also random ; risk . ...

p

p   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...p ( P ) 1. The abbreviation for the estimated probability of a result equal to or more extreme than that observed in a study, usually appearing in publications together with the symbol<for “less than” and familiar to all who read articles containing statistical analyses. Conventionally, a probability of less than 1 in 20 (i.e., p <0.05) is considered unlikely to have occurred by chance in many situations arising in medicine; e.g., results of clinical trials. Confidence intervals usually convey more information about the uncertainty attaching to an...

epidemiology

epidemiology   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...English in 1873 by J. P. Parkin to describe the science that deals with epidemics. At that time, a related word, epidemiología , had been used in Spanish for about 100 years. Epidemiology was one of three powerful scientific methods deployed against public health problems of 19th-century industrial Britain, rest of Europe, and the United States (the others were bacteriology and physical sciences). Epidemiology burgeoned as an increasingly rigorous science based on observation, inference, and experiment around the middle of the 20th century , with...

View: