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p20

1. p20-ARC One of the subunits of ARP2/3. 2. p20-CGGBP (CGG-binding protein1) A protein that binds to the unmethylated form of the trinucleotide repeat ...

‘SALMON’. taboo word

‘SALMON’. taboo word   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Superstitions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Society and culture, Customs and Traditions
Length:
201 words

...speak of a salmon, a circumlocution was used, and it was often named after the tax-man of the fishings nearest the villages … Sometimes it was called ‘The beast’. 1898 A. C. HADDON Study of Man 419–20. A fisherman told me that in Aberdeen the salmon is called ‘the red fish’ … it bringing bad luck for [it] to be called by [its] proper designation. 1930 P. F. ANSON East Coast of Scotland 40. I was on a Buckie drifter on Loch Ness when one of the crew … asked me if I did much fishing there. Without thinking, I replied: ‘Oh yes, plenty of … ’ But before I...

SATURDAY, beginning on: unlucky

SATURDAY, beginning on: unlucky   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Superstitions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Society and culture, Customs and Traditions
Length:
252 words

...Wales 242. A Welshman of the past would not begin a new undertaking on a Saturday if he could possibly avoid it. 1923 [Wellington, Som.] If you start work on a Saturday you will either marry or run away. 1930 P. F. ANSON East Coast of Scotland 40–2. Work begun on a Saturday was sure to ‘see seven Saturdays before completion.’ 1943 Woman, 20 [Thurso, Caithness] I'd move house any day but a Saturday, because ‘Saturday flittin's short...

EGGS after sunset

EGGS after sunset   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Superstitions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Society and culture, Customs and Traditions
Length:
246 words

...each day at noon; neither should they be sold or set under the hen after nightfall. 1923 P. S. JEFFREY Whitby Lore 138n. In some remote villages it is still considered unlucky to buy eggs after sunset, and any enquiry for eggs at this advanced hour is resented as bringing ill-fortune to the house. 1932 C. IGGLESDEN Those Superstitions 83. Duck's eggs should never be brought into a house after sunset if they are to be set, or they will never hatch. 1982 Woman, 20 [Cleveland, Yorks.] In the country, it is considered bad luck to bring eggs into the house...

CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS (evergreens), burning

CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS (evergreens), burning   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Superstitions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Society and culture, Customs and Traditions
Length:
372 words

...DECORATIONS (evergreens), burning ante 1072 Exeter Book (ed. G. P. Krapp et al. , maxim 2, ll. 79–80) Holly must be burned, a dead man's legacy divided. Good fame is ever best. 1648 HERRICK Hesperides 146 ‘New-yeares gift’. A jolly Verse crown'd with Yvie, and with Holly; That tels of … cracking Laurell, which fore-sounds, A Plentious harvest to your grounds. 1719 – 20 Hist. mss Commission Reports mss of Duke of Portland VII 269 [Christ Church, Oxford] It has been usual for our choristers to burn the day before Candlemas the greens...

VALENTINE: first person seen

VALENTINE: first person seen   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Superstitions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Society and culture, Customs and Traditions
Length:
393 words

...his haire was not pouderd and his Cloths were but ordinary. 1698 misson Voyage en Angleterre ( 1719 , 321) There is another kind of Valentine; which is the first young Man or Woman that Chance throws in your way, in the Street, or elsewhere on that Day. 1755 Connoisseur 20 Feb. Mr Blossom was my man: and I lay a-bed and shut my eyes all the morning [Valentine's Day], till he came to our house; for I would not have seen another man before him for all the world. 1812 J. BRADY Clavis Calendaria 1212–13 . The first person of the opposite sex who is...

‘PIG’. taboo word

‘PIG’. taboo word   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Superstitions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Society and culture, Customs and Traditions
Length:
440 words

... taboo word 1726 C. ELLISON Benwell Village 20 [Northumb.] Neither did here, In sight appear Of Swine, foul, dreadful Nomen; Which common Fame, Will oft proclaim Of Luck, dire, wretched Omen. 1861 E. B. RAMSAY Scottish Life 31–2 [E. coast, Fife] It was arranged that his friend [a visiting minister who could not believe the taboo] was to read the chapter relating to the herd of swine into which the evil spirits were cast. Accordingly, when the first verse was read … a slight commotion was observable among the audience, each one of them putting his...

‘HARE’ OR ‘RABBIT’ taboo word

‘HARE’ OR ‘RABBIT’ taboo word   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Superstitions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Society and culture, Customs and Traditions
Length:
514 words

...to it as a ‘Wilfred’ or ‘One of them furry things’. But if one person is very angry with another and really wishes them bad luck he will say ‘Rabbits to you’. 1963 Daily Express 20 Nov. 10 . On the Isle of Portland, near Weymouth, there is a superstitious fear of even the word ‘rabbit’. The local paper makes a solemn check to keep the word out of its Portland edition. 1965 P. F. ANSON Fisher Folk-Lore 131 n. Rabbit Island … was usually called ‘Gentlemen's Island’ by the Buckie [Banff.] fishermen to avoid using the unlucky word. 1981 Man, 60 [Norfolk]...

unicorns

unicorns   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...many diseases, including plague, epilepsy, and the bite of a mad dog. Various objects were sold as such, at very high prices; one kept in the Tower of London was officially valued at £600 in 1649 , though one visitor in 1635 had estimated it at £18,000 or £20,000 ( Travels of Peter Mundy , III, I, p. xx). Most were narwhal tusks; a slice from one, mounted in enamelled gold and dating from about 1560 , known as the Campion Pendant, has been partly pared away on the reverse, presumably so that the parings could be taken as medicine. Walrus tusks and...

Lagin

Lagin   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...Masters set this after 431 bc , the Book of Leinster after 307 bc . Contemporary scholarship suggests a much earlier date. They brought with them the Domnainn and the Galióin . See Thomas F. O'Rahilly , Early Irish History and Mythology (Dublin, 1946), 17–24, 101–20; Alfred P. Smyth , Celtic Leinster (Dublin,...

tig

tig   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...had, so I had to be he’, or even ‘If she hads a person when she is he the person she hads becomes he’. Of all the names noted by the Opies, ‘tick’ seems to be the oldest, being found in Drayton's Poly-Olbion (1622), p. xxx), whereas ‘tag’ is found from the 18th century, and ‘tig’ and ‘touch’ from the 19th century. Opie and Opie , 1969: 20–3,...

teeth

teeth   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...form of the superstition. A milder version gives it as a sign of a very bad temper; and in some districts it has been watered down to a vague prophecy of simple bad luck [ Folklore 68 (1957), 413] . By 1987 , a correspondent writing to the Daily Mirror [28 August 1987, p. 20] reports being puzzled by two contrasting beliefs—one, that such a child will be extremely clever, the other that he or she is born to be hanged. If a child was having difficulty cutting its first teeth, a little bag containing animal's teeth or adult human teeth might be hung...

ballads

ballads   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... remained extremely popular and were noted time and again by 19th- and 20th-century folk-song collectors on both sides of the Atlantic. Ballad scholarship has embraced many analytical perspectives, following the intellectual fashions of the day, including various linguistic, psychological, and literary approaches, and engendered a number of its own bitter controversies, starting with Ritson 's acerbic attack on Percy's editorial standards, and continuing with the ‘ballad war’ in the early 20th century between the communalists and the individualists who argued...

Imram Curaig Maíle Dúin

Imram Curaig Maíle Dúin   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...and medieval bestiaries. Whitley Stokes, ‘The Voyage of Mael Duin’, Revue Celtique , 9 ( 1889 ), 452–92, and 10 ( 1889 ), 50–94; A. G. van Hamel, ‘Immram Curaig Maíle Dúin’, in Immrama (Dublin, 1941 ), 20–77; H. P. A. Oskamp, The Voyage of the Máel Dúin: A Study (Groningen, 1970 ); M. Aguirre, Études Celtiques , 27 ( 1990 ), 203–20. P. W. Joyce's translation, ‘The Voyage of Maildun’, in Old Celtic Romances (London, 1879 ), inspired Alfred Lord Tennyson's late poem ‘The Voyage of Maeldune’. Twentieth-century poets adapting the narrative are...

cunning men, women

cunning men, women   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...Cunning-Woman, as they are termed, is to be found near every town, and though the laws are occasionally put in force against them, still it is a gainful trade’ ( Letters from England , p. 295). It is impossible to arrive at any figures, but anecdotal evidence indicates that they were quite common throughout the 19th century, and in some country areas in the first half of the 20th century. There were various popular names for them: wizards, conjurers, sorcerers, charmers , wise men/women, cunning men/women, the latter two being the most widespread. ‘White...

gremlins

gremlins   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

.... A subspecies of goblin which evolved early in the 20th century, probably during the First World War; certainly their existence was acknowledged (with dismay) by members of the RAF during the 1920s. They are reported to be anything from six inches to two feet in height, greenish or grey, sometimes with horns or hairy ears, and wearing a wide variety of colourful and eccentric clothing. Their original speciality was causing otherwise inexplicable malfunctions in the engines, electrical circuits, and other operational parts of aircraft, drinking up...

souling

souling   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

.... A visiting custom carried out in the 19th and 20th centuries mainly by children, but previously by adults, in the Shropshire, north Staffordshire, Cheshire, and Lancashire area, on All Saints Day (1 November) and All Souls Day (2 November). The soulers visited houses, sang a song, and collected money, food, drink, or whatever was given to them. The songs vary somewhat from place to place, but they all follow the same basic pattern:Soul, soul for a souling cakeI pray you, missis, for a souling cakeApple or pear, plum or cherryAnything good to make...

Ireland

Ireland   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...centuries hundreds of other collectors would fill libraries with narratives, many of which are rooted in the oldest documents of Irish literary tradition. The voluminous files of the Irish Folklore Commission, compiled in the 20th century, are more extensive than collections from any other western European country. At the end of the 20th century, the wellsprings of this oral tradition had by no means been exhausted. Oral tradition has survived the calamitous decline of the Irish language. The 1911 census recorded that only 17.6 per cent of the population...

Folklore Society

Folklore Society   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... Allan Gomme , Folk-Lore 63 (1952), 1–18; Sona Rosa Burstein , Folklore 69 (1958), 73–92; E. O. James , Folklore 70 (1959), 382–94; Katharine M. Briggs , in Animals in Folklore , ed. Hilda R. Ellis Davidson and W. M. S. Russell (1978), 4–20; J. R. Porter , in Folklore Studies in the 20th Century , ed. Venetia Newall (1978): 1–13; Davidson , 1986: 143–7; Folklore 98 (1987),...

Hebrew Creation

Hebrew Creation  

A Dictionary of Creation Myths

...that P describes—a structure that establishes this as a historical text, a precursor to a continuing forward movement of history—another structure emerges in the form of a series of phrases that are repeated before, during, and after acts of creation: “Let there be …,” “God said,” “And it was so,” “God called,” “God saw that it was good,” “And there was evening and there was morning.…” This is a god in total command, creating from thought and ex nihilo ( see also Creation by Thought ; Creation from Nothing ). In an almost pedantic style, P describes...

sword dance

sword dance   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...indicate possible dances in Cumberland. In these counties, the dancers are mentioned frequently by 19th-century folklorists and other writers as an essential part of Christmas or New Year celebrations, visiting homes and farms and performing in town and village streets. The 20th century found the traditions in definite decline. Many teams had ceased to function completely, and others performed intermittently. It is certainly true that the interest engendered by the work of Sharp and others enthused by his example resulted in the survival or revival of a...

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