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p20

1. p20-ARC One of the subunits of ARP2/3. 2. p20-CGGBP (CGG-binding protein1) A protein that binds to the unmethylated form of the trinucleotide repeat ...

Parker, Thomas

Parker, Thomas (1787–1866)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
117 words

...heard him sing as early as 20 July 1829 , at a major concert of sacred music in Haworth church. He often sang at the annual vocal and instrumental concert of the Haworth Philharmonic Society (founded c. 1780 ), held in the Black Bull Inn. He and his musical family, all named after famous musicians, were professionals who helped foster community music (Barker, p. 210). On 22 December 1838 , Branwell completed an oil portrait of Parker, represented with a viola or cello as symbol of his profession ( Alexander & Sellars , p....

‘Lines on the Celebrated Bewick’

‘Lines on the Celebrated Bewick’   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
112 words

...the birds and their surroundings seem ‘pictured thoughts that breathe’, and recall the love and light of childhood days. Eloquent and picturesque despite occasional clichés of poetic diction, the 20 alternate‐rhymed quatrains move gracefully, and the intertwined description and emotion are satisfyingly framed by opening and closing elegiac stanzas. Neufeldt CBP , p....

Methodist Magazine

Methodist Magazine   Reference library

Carol A. Bock

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
126 words

...in Shirley as ‘mad Methodist Magazines, full of miracles and apparitions, of preternatural warnings, ominous dreams, and frenzied fanaticism’ (p. 440), the Methodist Magazine inspired some of the children's early supernatural tales. Joseph Benson , the editor from 1804 to 1821 , when the issues owned by Mrs Brontë were published, was a learned and conservative man who increased the magazine's circulation to 20,000. Carol A. Bock Althoz, Josef L. , The Religious Press in Britain, 1760–1900 (1989)....

‘Often rebuked, yet always back returning’

‘Often rebuked, yet always back returning’   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
323 words

...‘Often rebuked, yet always back returning’ , undated poem, of 20 lines by Emily Brontë , published by Charlotte in 1850 . Since no manuscript has been found and since all of the other sixteen poems published by Charlotte came from one of Emily's manuscript notebooks, the authorship of this poem has been called into question. Hatfield ( EBP , p. 255) believed it sounded more like Charlotte and others have suggested Anne ( BST ( 1982 ), 18. 92. 143). More recently, Gezari has supported the claim for Charlotte's authorship since resemblances to Emily's poems...

Haworth National School

Haworth National School   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
523 words

...to Haworth in May 1845 , but was perhaps on firmer ground when he implied that Nicholls's hard work helped to raise the numbers to ‘between two & three hundred’ pupils by January 1853 (Lock & Dixon, p. 457). The building of the Haworth Board Schools in 1896 brought about ‘the demise of the Church and Methodist day schools in Haworth’ ( BST ( 1991 ), 20. 3....

Noah o'Tims

Noah o'Tims   Reference library

Herbert Rosengarten

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
261 words

...of Noah's name follows the patronymic tradition that was still found in parts of the north of England at the end of the 19th century; another instance occurs in Shirley , p. 655 (‘John‐of‐Mally's‐of‐Hannah's‐of‐Deb's’) (Wroot, pp. 122–3). Noah is drawn as ‘a little dapper strutting man, with a turned‐up nose’ ( Shirley , p. 149), exhibiting ‘an exceedingly self‐confident and conceited air’ (p. 150). Through his exaggerated formality and pretentious diction, Charlotte Brontë seeks to portray the hypocrisy of professional agitators who manipulate ‘honest though...

Stancliffe's Hotel

Stancliffe's Hotel   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
412 words

...as a thriving industrial town. Although ostensibly in Africa, Charlotte's settings and background events are now based on a more realistic portrayal of the commerce and politics of England in the 1830s (Alexander EW , p. 177). The narrator Charles Townshend ( see wellesley, lord charles albert florian ), a self-opinionated young dandy of 20, plays an active part in his picaresque tale as he takes the reader on a journey through the new kingdom of Angria. The opening episode involves a comic satire on Methodism , as Charles reports on a visit to Ebenezer...

Brown family

Brown family   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
369 words

...weavers in factories. Branwell Brontë 's large portrait of William Brown is illustrated in Alexander & Sellars (p. 328). With the death of William in 1875 , the office of sexton of Haworth came to an end, and was replaced by that of verger. The Brown family had connections with the Three Graces Lodge in Haworth ( see freemasonry ). Emsley, Kenneth , ‘ The Browns, Sextons of Haworth, and their Families, 1807–1876 ’, BST (1992), 20...

Thorp Green Hall

Thorp Green Hall   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
289 words

...library were luxuriously furnished, and their walls hung with valuable paintings—unlike the schoolroom (probably on the second floor) with its drugget, old hearth rug, and painted bookshelves, though even here there were 20 pictures. Anne herself drew and painted while she was at Thorp Green (see for example Alexander & Sellars, no. 358 on p. 411). The library, schoolroom, and several other rooms housed a substantial collection of classical, theological, and other works. The outbuildings included a dairy, and there was stabling for fourteen horses. Mr Robinson...

Binns family

Binns family   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
312 words

...Binns family , tailors in Haworth at the time of the Brontës. Their name figures largely in the provenance of Brontë items, which were still being purchased for the BPM from Binns descendants well into the 20th century (for example, Branwell's oil painting of John Brown : Alexander & Sellars , p. 323). When Martha Brown (the Brontës' surviving servant) died in 1880 , she left her substantial collection of Brontë items (including a portfolio of pencil drawings and watercolour sketches) to her five sisters, all of whom soon sold their ‘relics’ to...

Dearden, William

Dearden, William (1803–89)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
418 words

.... After Elizabeth Gaskell 's biography of Charlotte, Dearden sprang to the defence of ‘this venerable clergyman’ and corrected a number of stories about Mr Brontë, at the same time recording his own memories of the family in letters to the Bradford Observer ( 20 Aug. 1857 , p. 8, and 27 June 1861 , p. 7). He interviewed the servant Nancy Garrs ( see servants of the brontës ) and reported that Patrick did not dine alone during her time at the Parsonage, that he taught his children ‘at stated times during the day’, and that ‘His children were the frequent...

finances of the Brontës

finances of the Brontës   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
769 words

...(£1 13 s. p.a.), and 14 s. from a Goodman exhibition. In addition William Wilberforce and Henry Thornton agreed to pay £10 each per annum. He must have welcomed the £60 p.a. of his Wethersfield curacy. The value of his Wellington, Shropshire , and Dewsbury curacies is not known; his Hartshead living was worth £62 p.a. plus a small lodging allowance. His living at Thornton was nominally £140 p.a., but in practice only £127, and he applied for help from Queen Anne 's Bounty on 27 January 1820 . The Haworth living was £170 p.a., with the...

Cricket on the Hearth, The

Cricket on the Hearth, The   Reference library

Paul Schlicke

Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
513 words

...launch the Daily News and published by Bradbury and Evans on 20 December 1845 , with illustrations by Leech , Maclise , Doyle , and Stanfield (the illustrators for The chimes ), plus an engraving of Boxer the dog by Landseer . Although Forster 's claim (5.1) that its sales ‘doubled’ those of the Carol and The Chimes is incorrect, reviews were generally favourable and it quickly went through two editions, which brought Dickens profits of £1,022 5s 5d ( Patten 1978 , p. 168). The Cricket on the Hearth. A Fairy Tale of Home concerns the...

Halifax Guardian

Halifax Guardian   Reference library

Carol A. Bock

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
344 words

...1841 ), ‘On Melbourne's Ministry’ ( 14 Aug. 1841 ), ‘Real Rest’ ( 8 Nov. 1845 ), ‘Penmaenmawr’ ( 20 Dec. 1845 ), ‘Letter from a Father on Earth to his Child in her Grave’ ( 18 Apr. 1846 ), ‘Speak Kindly to Thy Fellow Man’ ( 19 Sept. 1846 ), and ‘The End of All’ ( 5 June 1847 ). Conservative in its political orientation, the Halifax Guardian also printed Revd Patrick Brontë 's letter ‘on the ominous and dangerous vagaries of the times’ (quoted in Barker, p. 428) on 29 July 1843 . Emily's ‘Death Scene’ was reprinted in the Halifax Guardian five months...

Turner, Joseph Horsfall

Turner, Joseph Horsfall (1845–1915)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
343 words

...of C. K. Shorter and T. J. Wise , all but about twelve copies were burnt. Turner later bought numerous Brontë autographs from Wise. These, and a collection of photographs used in Haworth Past and Present , were acquired by the Brontë Society in 1974 . In BST ( 1990 ), 20. 1. 3–11 Juliet Barker used Turner's photograph of the ‘Gun Group’ portrait of the Brontës to prove that Branwell painted two, not three, group portraits...

post-colonial theory

post-colonial theory   Reference library

Carol A. Bock

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,359 words

...at Home ( 1996 ). Azim, like Spivak, criticizes the ‘implicit imperialism’ (p. 145) within the tradition of feminist literary criticism on the Brontës, and she faults critics for failing to notice ‘the theme of colonial adventure that lies at the heart of the juvenilia’ (p. 138). Azim's work is most original and enlightening in its claim that Charlotte gradually developed ‘the most important formal device that accrues to the novel [as a literary form] … the narrative subject’ (p. 145) by repeatedly invoking in her juvenilia a racial Other (like Quashia...

Mystery of Edwin Drood, The

Mystery of Edwin Drood, The   Reference library

Paul Schlicke

Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
3,631 words

... Book of Memoranda (Clarendon Introduction, p. xiii; Kaplan 1981 ). Dolby and Forster are agreed that Dickens was thinking hard about the novel later in the summer, and he compiled a list of trial titles on 20 August (Dolby 1885 , p. 434; to Forster, 6 August 1869 ; Clarendon Edition, Appendix A). He was, according to Dolby, ‘sorely puzzled’ over the title, but by 27 September The Mystery of Edwin Drood had been determined upon, and a little ‘christening party’ held in celebration (Dolby 1885 , p. 436). On 18 October Dickens reported to ...

Christmas Carol, A

Christmas Carol, A   Reference library

Paul Schlicke

Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
970 words

...revised it down to one and a half hours. It remained in his repertoire throughout his reading career, and was the principal reading in his final Farewell performance in 1870 (Collins 1975 , p. 1). Interestingly, it is the only one of Dickens's works in which ‘the vast majority’ of adaptations have appeared in the 20th rather than the 19th century ( Bolton 1987 , p. 234). There have been innumerable stage, radio, and film versions; Scrooge's name and his cry, ‘Bah! Humbug!’, are universally known. Philip Collins describes it as having ‘institutional...

Milton, John

Milton, John (1608–74)   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Hardy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
433 words

...numerous in his later work, especially Tess of the d'Urbervilles , Jude the Obscure , and The Dynasts . The last of these was conceived as an epic-drama, and at an early stage Hardy reread Milton, the most important epic poet in English (see LW 212). In a letter of 20 February 1908 (quoted LW 492) he links Milton's name and his own: ‘like Paradise Lost , The Dynasts proves nothing’. Joan Grundy , however, has argued that it is Tess rather than The Dynasts that is Hardy's Paradise Lost , and has noted in this novel a number of direct...

money and debt

money and debt   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to George Eliot

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
491 words

...( see will ), and enjoyed making appropriate gifts. The moral dimension of debt is poignantly acknowledged by Godfrey Cass , realizing that he must ‘pass for childless’ because ‘there's debts we can't pay like money debts, by paying extra for the years that have slipped by’ ( SM 20). Godfrey and his brother Dunstan are among a number of young men in George Eliot's fiction in whom the compounding difficulties of getting into debt are depicted. Many of them, like the Casses, are financially embarrassed when they trade on their expectations: other instances...

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