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oxymoron

Subject: Literature

(from two Greek words meaning ‘sharp’, ‘dull’), a rhetorical figure by which two incongruous or contradictory terms are united in an expression so as to give it point; e.g. ‘Faith ...

oxymoron

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
25 words

... [ɒksɪˈmɔːrɒn] Term in rhetoric for the deliberate coupling of words that are strictly contradictory: e.g. in a devout atheist , or I am relaxing strenuously...

oxymoron

oxymoron n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n . A figure of speech involving the combination of semantically contradictory elements, thus forcing a figurative interpretation, as in Milton’s living death or, according to some, British intelligence . oxymoronic adj . [From Greek oxys sharp + moros ...

Oxymoron

Oxymoron   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... A rhetorical figure in which effect is produced by the juxtaposition of contradictory terms, such as: ‘Make haste slowly’, ‘Faith unfaithful kept him falsely true.’ The word is the Greek for ‘pointedly...

oxymoron

oxymoron   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
44 words

... [from two Greek words meaning ‘sharp’, ‘dull’] A rhetorical figure by which two incongruous or contradictory terms are united in an expression so as to give it point, for example ‘Faith unfaithful kept him falsely true’ (Tennyson, Idylls of the King )....

oxymoron

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The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
44 words

... [from two Greek words meaning ‘sharp’, ‘dull’]  A rhetorical figure by which two incongruous or contradictory terms are united in an expression so as to give it point, for example ‘Faith unfaithful kept him falsely true’ (Tennyson, Idylls of the King...

Oxymoron

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F. J. Warnke, A. W. Halsall, and T.V.F. Brogan

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...Miltonic oxymoron “darkness visible,” “‘darkness’ imposes the classeme obscure , which is cancelled by visible .” Thus, oxymoron is a “ coincidentia oppositorum in which the antithesis is denied and the contradiction fully assented to.” Oxymoron differs from antiphrasis, a “metalogism [figure of thought] by repetition ( A is not A ),” because oxymoron “violates the code and belongs de facto to the class of metasememes [tropes].” Group μ ‎ does not discuss the difference between oxymoron and paradox. Dupriez distinguishes between oxymoron (words),...

Oxymoron

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The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...Oxymoron [From Greek oxúmōros sharp and dull. Stress: ‘awk-si-Mo-ron’] . A term in rhetoric for bringing opposites together in a compact paradoxical word or phrase: bitter-sweet ; a cheerful pessimist . The term is often used for social comment, humorously or cynically (such as in reference to military intelligence , conceived as a contradiction in terms) and dramatically, as in ‘It has become an oxymoron to speak of the Lebanese nation’ ( Jim Hoagland , The Washington Post , Apr. 1989 ). ...

oxymoron

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Chris Baldick

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... , a compressed paradox, in which complete opposites qualify one another: Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health ( Romeo and Juliet 1.1.177) This figure of speech is particularly associated with Petrarch , and became a cliché among his English imitators. Chris...

Oxymōron

Oxymōron   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
297 words

... is a metasememe that consists of a collocation of two and more logically contradictory lexemes or sememes bound together by a hypersememe as a common semantic denominator, such as “weight” in the constituents “heavy” and “light” of the oxymōron “heavy lightness” ( Shakespeare , Romeo and Juliet , 1.1.178). Oxymōra can be realized in the following syntactic constructions: (1) adjective (or participle) plus noun: “living death” ( Milton , Samson Agonistes , 1671 , v.100); (2) adjective (or participle) plus adjective (or participle) plus noun:...

oxymoron

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The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... [ oksi- mor -on ] ( plural -mora ) A figure of speech that combines two usually contradictory terms in a compressed paradox , as in the word bittersweet or the phrase living death . Oxymoronic phrases, like Milton ’s ‘darkness visible’, were especially cultivated in 16th- and 17th-century poetry. Shakespeare has his Romeo utter several in one speech: Why then, O brawling love, O loving hate, O anything of nothing first create; O heavy lightness, serious vanity, Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms, Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold...

oxymoron

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An A-Z Guide to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... A figure of speech which yokes opposites together, e.g. ‘Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health’ ( Romeo and Juliet , I. i....

oxymoron

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
24 words

... (rhet.) figure in which contradictory terms are conjoined. XVII. — Gr. oxúmōron , n. sg. of oxúmoros pointedly foolish, f. oxús sharp + mōrós ...

oxymoron

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New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
140 words

... • Agamemnon , Memnon • ninon , xenon • noumenon • Trianon • xoanon • organon • Simenon • Maintenon • crampon , kampong, tampon • Nippon • coupon • Akron , Dacron, macron • electron • natron • Hebron • positron • Heilbronn • micron • boron , moron, oxymoron • neutron • interferon • fleuron , Huron, neuron • Oberon • mellotron • aileron • cyclotron • Percheron • Mitterrand • vigneron • croissant • Maupassant • garçon • Cartier-Bresson • exon • frisson • Oxon • chanson • Tucson • soupçon • Aubusson • Besançon • penchant • torchon •...

oxymoron

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Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
228 words

...Canadian’ was an oxymoron, but that Eric was obviously an exception— M. Atwood, 1990 . 2 The name is properly used of a deliberate literary device, and should not be used to mean simply an accidental or casual contradiction in terms: * Robert proves why it’s no oxymoron to be known as a creative producer — Take One (magazine), 2003 ; * The divide is between man-centered worship (surely an oxymoron) and God-centered worship—religious website , 2004 . In neither of these sentences is there an oxymoron in the proper sense: contradiction in terms ...

oxymoron

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Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
162 words

...an oxymoron ) and God-centered worship —religious website, 2004 [ OEC ]. In neither of these sentences is there an oxymoron in the proper sense. The offence is even worse when the contradiction is not contained within a term at all: ☒ It seems like an oxymoron, but rock has benefited enormously from singers who really shouldn’t have been singing — Pitchfork Media album reviews , 2004 . The word wanted here is paradox...

oxymoron

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The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

... a figure of speech in which apparently contradictory terms appear in conjunction (e.g. faith unfaithful kept him falsely true ). Recorded from the mid 17th century, the word comes from Greek oxumōron , neuter (used as a noun) of oxumōros ‘pointedly foolish’, from oxus ‘sharp’ + mōros ...

oxymoron

oxymoron noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
73 words
oxymoron

oxymoron noun   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
70 words
oxymoron

oxymoron noun   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
40 words
oxymoron

oxymoron noun   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
50 words

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