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onomatopoeic theory

A theory of the origins of language, according to which words originated as imitations of natural sounds in the environment. US onomatopeic theory. Also (dismissively) called the bow-wow ...

onomatopoeic theory

onomatopoeic theory n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... theory n . A theory of the origins of language, according to which words originated as imitations of natural sounds in the environment. US onomatopeic theory . Also (dismissively) called the bow-wow theory or ding-dong theory . [From onomatopoeia the formation of words that are imitative of the sounds of the concepts...

onomatopoeic theory

onomatopoeic theory  

A theory of the origins of language, according to which words originated as imitations of natural sounds in the environment. US onomatopeic theory. Also (dismissively) called the bow-wow theory or ...
ding-dong theory

ding-dong theory  

A dismissive name for the onomatopoeic theory of the origins of language. Also called the bow-wow theory. [From the sound of bells ringing]
bow-wow theory

bow-wow theory  

A dismissive name for the onomatopoeic theory of the origin of language. Also called the ding-dong theory. [From the sound of a dog barking]
bow-wow theory

bow-wow theory n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...theory n. A dismissive name for the onomatopoeic theory of the origin of language. Also called the ding-dong theory . [From the sound of a dog...

ding-dong theory

ding-dong theory n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...theory n. A dismissive name for the onomatopoeic theory of the origins of language. Also called the bow-wow theory . [From the sound of bells...

onomatopoeic

onomatopoeic   Reference library

Garner's Modern English Usage (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
307 words

...theory is that words imitated natural sounds, such as the cries of animals or the noises made by rapidly moving or colliding objects. Words that had this origin are sometimes said to be onomatopoetic , but the term echoic is to be preferred as being shorter, easier to spell, and more obviously descriptive of what is intended.” G.L. Brook , A History of the English Language 17 ( 1958 ). Onomatopoeic is pronounced /on-ә-mat-ә- pee -ik/ . Take care not to use the sloppy pronunciation /on-ә-mon-ә- pee -ik/ . Current ratio in print ( onomatopoeic ...

Qing

Qing   Reference library

Alan R. Thrasher

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
683 words

...Qing . Lithophone employed in Han Chinese Confucian rituals. The name (pronounced ‘ching’) is onomatopoeic; its earliest written character is a pictograph of a suspended stone. Constructed of resonant limestone or marble, the instrument hangs from a cord through a hole near its apex and is struck at one end with a wooden beater. Single stones are known as teqing (‘special’ qing); sets of tuned stones are known as bianqing (‘arranged’ qing). Dozens of ancient proto-qing have been unearthed in Shanxi province and other areas of North China, dating to about...

stuttering

stuttering   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Body

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
992 words

...Stuttering (or stammering , as it is often called in Britain) is probably the best known and most researched speech disorder, but perhaps the most difficult to define, to explain, and to treat, especially in adults. Both names are onomatopoeic: the essential features of stuttering are frequent repetitions and prolongations of sound or syllables. Other problems of fluency may also characterize stuttering, including blocking of sounds or interjection of words or sounds. However, the sudden sensation of a loss of control over the ability to produce an...

Pascoli, Giovanni

Pascoli, Giovanni (1855–1912)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Italian Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
962 words

...poetic language, discarding lofty diction in favour of a more conversational idiom and exploiting, for the first time in the history of Italian poetry, words for commonplace objects, from agricultural machinery and domestic utensils to flower-names and bird-names, as well as onomatopoeic representations of bird-calls and other sounds. His technical precision may be a source of incomprehension even for an Italian reader. He even borrowed non-Italian words (for instance, ‘chicken-house’, ‘pie’, ‘flavour’ in his poem ‘Italy’, about Italian emigrants returning...

arbitrariness, principle of

arbitrariness, principle of   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Semiotics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
711 words

...a decision to exclude such phenomena from the theoretically privileged domain of langue . For Saussure, such expressions “are never organic elements of a linguistic system” ( 1971 , 101) because langue is a system of purely internal relations of value. To the extent that onomatopoeic words are truly imitative and not, therefore, conventional, they are motivated by extralinguistic phenomena that do not fall within the province of langue . Thus, the purely system-based criterion of arbitrariness is compromised. It is ironic that Saussure, in order to...

Russolo, Luigi

Russolo, Luigi   Reference library

Flora Dennis and Hugh Davies

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
1,070 words

...assistant Ugo Piatti, he constructed intonarumori (noise intoners) between 1913 and 1921 with which he put his theories into practice. These instruments were mostly based on the principle of the hurdy gurdy: the instrument was housed in a brightly painted box and the performer turned a crank or pressed an electric button at the rear to operate it; pitch was controlled by a lever on the top. By the end of 1913, 15 such machines, bearing onomatopoeic names such as the scoppiatore (exploder) and ululatore (howler), had been constructed and demonstrated in...

Xiao

Xiao   Reference library

Alan R. Thrasher

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
1,574 words

...Xiao . Vertical notched flute of the Han Chinese. The name xiao (pronounced ‘hsiao’) is onomatopoeic. Regional names include dongxiao , chiba , and yuping xiao . The xiao is constructed of bamboo, with an inward-sloping notch at the upper end, five fingerholes plus one thumbhole, and two or more vent holes near the lower end, through which colourful tassels are sometimes attached. Overall lengths vary regionally. For flutes pitched in D (all holes closed), the sounding length, defined by the vent holes, is about 50 to 52 cm, depending upon bore size...

Zheng

Zheng   Reference library

Han Mei

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
1,113 words

...back more than 2500 years. The Chinese character for zheng has two portions: zhu , the radical for ‘bamboo’, above, and zheng, the icon for ‘fight’, below. The 2nd-century ce dictionary Shuowen jiezi states: ‘The zheng has plucked strings and a bamboo body. [Its music onomatopoeically] sounds “zheng”’. This suggests that the name is a phonetic complex: the bamboo radical refers to the material used to construct the instrument during its early development, while zheng, the lower portion, is a representation of its sound when played. However, the lower...

Poetry

Poetry   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Language reference, History of English, Linguistics
Length:
1,062 words

...adds the aesthetic effect of lines grouped on a page, or even of poems shaped in a visual pattern, like George Herbert ’s ‘Easter Wings’. Other phonic features are added to the basic metrical pattern of verse, with or without rhyme. Thus, the sound of words may be directly onomatopoeic or may give a less overt effect of sound symbolism. Both are heard in Tennyson ’s ‘Come Down, O Maid’ ( 1847 ): The moan of doves in immemorial elms And murmuring of innumerable bees. Slow or rapid movement can be suggested by a deliberate pattern of sounds and syllables as...

meaning

meaning   Reference library

J. E. Tiles

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
3,861 words

...overcome this problem by finding a natural relation holding between things that have meanings (i.e. signs) and the things they mean (or signify). The idea that meaning is, or needs to be, founded upon a natural relation is responsible for the lure of causal, picture, and onomatopoeic theories. Cause and effect and similarity of shape are thought to be relations which hold independently of being recognized by a mind. Plato ( Cratylus , 432–5 ) argued against the idea that the meaning relation could be founded purely on a natural relation of similarity. No...

Literature

Literature   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
3,952 words

...and variations. This may explain why theories of literature have tended to emphasize one or the other group of features as literature's defining properties, since it has so far not proven easy to identify what all of these features have in common. Literature as a Verbal Art The features of the first type rely on the inventive use of language's physical or signifying dimensions. Sound patterning is essential to verse, if not literature in general. Poets have occasionally utilized aural elements, such as the onomatopoeic mimicry of natural sounds, as a...

Old English

Old English   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to Literature in English Translation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
1,599 words

...as is E. Talbot Donaldson's prose translation of Beowulf . Burton Raffel has produced free versions of Beowulf and other short poems, and has also published on the theory of translation, especially from Old English. Kevin Crossley-Holland's work is a happy combination of faithful translating by an established poet. The very first word of Beowulf —‘Hwæt!’—a (possibly onomatopoeic) call for attention, immediately presents difficulties for translators of the poem; as well as Thorpe's ‘Ay’, it has been rendered by ‘Lo!’ (dignified, but inappropriately...

Futurism

Futurism   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
3,993 words

...together in their prosody. Instead we employ very brief anonymous mathematical and musical symbols and we put between parentheses indications such as (fast) (faster) (slower) (two beat time) to control the speed of the style. These parentheses can even cut into a word or an onomatopoeic harmony.… My revolution is aimed at the so-called typographical harmony of the page, which is contrary to the flux and reflux, the leaps and bursts of style that run through the page. On the same page therefore, we will use three or four colours of ink, or even twenty...

Biblical instruments

Biblical instruments   Reference library

Joachim Braun

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
7,678 words

...and can be regarded as ritual instruments.(vi) Metziltayim and tzeltzelim (metziltayim : Ezra iii.10; Nehemiah xii.27; 1 Chronicles xiii.8, xv.16, 19, and 28, xvi.5 and 42, xxv.1 and 6; 2 Chronicles v.12–13, xxix.25; tzeltzelim : 2 Samuel vi.5; Psalm cl.5). Onomatopoeic in nature (from Heb. tzltzl : ‘to clink’, ‘to jingle’), the word metziltayim (an idiomatic Hebrew dual form) appears only in the post-Exile books of the Old Testament. All written sources confirm the interpretation of the instrument as cymbals ( kimbalon in the Septuagint,...

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