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ode

Subject: Literature

In literature, a lyrical poem. In Ancient Greece an ode was recited to mus. acc. In its mus. sense, the term often means a ceremonial work, e.g. Purcell's Ode for St Cecilia's Day and ...

ODE

ODE   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Mathematics (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021

...ODE Short for ‘ordinary differential equation’. See differential equation...

ode

ode   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
19 words

... [Gk. ōdē , ‘song’] In Greek or Latin, a lyric poem in stanza form ( see strophe and triad...

ode

ode   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...), whereas Horace wrote literary odes in regular stanzas . Close English imitations of Pindar, such as Thomas Gray ’s ‘The Progress of Poesy’ ( 1754 ), are rare, but a looser irregular ode with varying lengths of strophes was introduced by Abraham Cowley ’s ‘Pindarique Odes’ ( 1656 ) and followed by John Dryden , William Collins , William Wordsworth (in ‘Ode: Intimations of Immortality’ ( 1807 )), and S. T. Coleridge , among others; this irregular form of ode is sometimes called the Cowleyan ode . Odes in which the same form of stanza is...

ode

ode   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
60 words

... Lyric poem of unspecific form but typically of heightened emotion or public address. The first great writer of odes was Pindar , but more simple were the lyrical odes of Horace and Catullus . In 17th-century England, it was taken up by Jonson , Herrick , and Marvell . Representative of the more personal type are the 19th-century odes of Wordsworth , Shelley , and Keats...

ode

ode   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Music (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music
Length:
62 words

... In literature, a lyrical poem. In Ancient Greece an ode was recited to music acc. In its music sense, the term often means a ceremonial work, e.g. Purcell’s Ode for St Cecilia’s Day and Elgar’s Coronation Ode , but sometimes the term is used for works with particular significance to the composer, e.g. Elgar’s The Music Makers and Stravinsky’s Ode: Elegiacal Chant...

ode

ode   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
546 words

...remarkable number of outstanding odes, including S. T. Coleridge 's ‘Dejection: An Ode’; William Wordsworth's ‘Ode: Intimations of Immortality…’ ; P. B. Shelley 's ‘Ode to the West Wind’ and ‘To a Sky‐Lark’; and Keats's ‘Ode to a Nightingale’ and ‘Ode on a Grecian Urn’ . With a few notable exceptions, such as Alfred Tennyson 's ‘Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington’ ( 1852 ), the Pindaric ode was not congenial to Victorian sensibilities. One of the most successful modern examples of the form is Allen Tate 's ‘Ode to the Confederate Dead’ ( 1927...

ode

ode   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
645 words

...odes, including S. T. Coleridge 's ‘Dejection: An Ode’; William Wordsworth's ‘Ode: Intimations of Immortality…’ ; P. B. Shelley 's ‘Ode to the West Wind’ and ‘To a Sky‐Lark’; and Keats's ‘Ode to a Nightingale’ and ‘Ode on a Grecian Urn’ . With a few notable exceptions, such as Alfred Tennyson 's ‘Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington’ ( 1852 ), the Pindaric ode was not congenial to Victorian sensibilities, nor was it revived with much success in the 20th century. One of the most successful modern examples of the form is Allen Tate 's ‘Ode to...

ode

ode   Reference library

Jane Bellingham

The Oxford Companion to Music

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Music
Length:
229 words

...Such works include odes for royal birthdays, coronations, funerals, banquets, the return of the monarch from a journey, and pieces for New Year and St Cecilia's Day; they were usually performed by the Gentlemen and Children of the Chapel Royal with instrumentalists from the royal household. Among the composers who wrote odes were Blow , Purcell (24, including Hail, bright Cecilia , 1692 ), Clarke , and Handel ( Ode for Queen Anne's Birthday , 1713 , and Ode for St Cecilia , 1739 ). After 1820 the practice declined, though occasional...

Ode

Ode   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Literature in French

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
375 words

... (from Greek ōdē , a poem to be sung, and thus a generic term for the lyric). In condemning the ballade and other medieval formes fixes as ‘épiceries’, Du Bellay recommended in the Défense : ‘Sing me those odes, still unknown to the French muse, with a lute well tuned to the Greek and Roman lyre, and let no sound be without some mark of rare and ancient learning.’ Ronsard 's five books of odes ( 1550–3 ) draw on the two large strains of odal inspiration: the Pindaric, with its mode of heroic celebration, its monumental triadic structures (strophe,...

Ode

Ode   Reference library

S. F. Fogle and P. H. Fry

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
2,348 words

...romantic ode that best suits the remark of Susan Stewart that “[o]des give birth to poets.” The Eng. romantic ode begins with S. T. Coleridge ’s “Dejection: An Ode” ( 1802 ) and William Wordsworth ’s pseudo-Pindaric “Ode: Intimations of Immortality” ( 1804 , pub. 1807 ). Wordsworth’s “Intimations” ode, with its varied line lengths, complex rhyme scheme, and stanzas of varying length and pattern, has been called the greatest Eng. Pindaric ode. Of the other major romantic poets, P. B. Shelley wrote the “Ode to the West Wind” and Keats the “Ode on a...

Ode

Ode   Reference library

Charles Jurgensmeier

The Grove Dictionary of American Music (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
316 words

...George W. Chadwick's Ode for the Opening of the Chicago World's Fair —a partial setting of the 400-line poem by Harriet Moore for the occasion), and the bicentennial of the founding of Yale University in 1901 (Horatio Parker's Hymnos Andron ) and Edward Burlingame Hill's Ode (for the Boston Symphony Orchestra's 50th Anniversary). Other odes include Parker's Ode for the Commencement Day at Yale University ( 1895 ) and Spirit of Beauty ( 1905 ) for the dedication of an art gallery, George Frederick Bristow's The Great Republic: Ode to the American...

Ode

Ode   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Dance (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
94 words

...Ode Ballet-oratorio in two acts with choreography by Massine , libretto by Kochno , music by Nabokov , designs by Pavel Tchelitchev (sets and costumes) and Pierre Charbonnier (projections). Premiered 6 Jun. 1928 by the Ballets Russes de Diaghilev at the Théâtre Sarah Bernhardt in Paris, with Irina Beliankina and Serge Lifar . The ballet, based on a visionary hymn to nature by the 18th-century Russian court poet Lomonosov , made use of the latest technology, including neon lights and film projections. Despite its spectacular stage effects, Ode ...

Ode, Toko

Ode, Toko   Reference library

Benezit Dictionary of Asian Artists

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Ode, Toko Japanese , 19th – 20th century, male. Painter . Ode Toko worked on silk. He exhibited at the Salon des Artistes Français in Paris and was awarded an honourable mention at the Exposition Universelle in 1900...

Ijebu-Ode

Ijebu-Ode (Ogun/Nigeria)   Quick reference

Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Place Names (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...Ijebu-Ode , Ogun/Nigeria For long the capital of the Ijebu people, a subdivision of the Yoruba, after whom the town is named....

ōdē'um

ōdē'um   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
142 words

...'um (Gk. ōdeion , Eng. odeon) In Greece, a theatre built for musical performances and, unlike other Greek theatres, provided with a roof supported by pillars. A famous odeum was built by Pericles c. 444 bc east of and near to the theatre of Dionysus at Athens, supposedly in imitation of the tent of Xerxes, for concerts and the musical contests of the Panathenaea . The proagon also took place here. The Athenians themselves set fire to this odeum before the invasion of Sulla in 86 bc so that the enemy would not find in it a ready supply of wood for...

Coronation Ode

Coronation Ode   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Music

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Music
Length:
86 words

...Coronation Ode . Choral work, op. 44, by Elgar , for four soloists, chorus, and orchestra, a setting of words by A. C. Benson . It was commissioned for the Covent Garden gala performance to celebrate Edward VII's coronation in June 1902 ; the gala was cancelled because of the king's illness and the work was given its premiere at the Sheffield Festival in October that year. The finale, ‘Land of Hope and Glory’, is to a melody adapted from the trio section of Elgar's first *Pomp and Circumstance ...

Coronation Ode

Coronation Ode   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Music (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music
Length:
68 words

...Ode Choral work, Op.44, for 4 soloists, ch, and orch by Elgar to words by A. C. Benson . Commissioned for CG gala perf for Coronation of Edward VII , June 1902 (cancelled because of King's illness). F.p. Sheffield Fest. Oct. 1902 . Finale is ‘Land of Hope and Glory’ , to melody from trio of Pomp and Circumstance March No.1, but with words differing from the song...

Ode to Death

Ode to Death   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Music (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music
Length:
23 words

... to Death Setting for chorus and orchestra, Op.38, by Holst of text by Whitman . Comp. 1919 . F.p. Leeds Fest. 1922 , London 1923...

‘Dejection: An Ode’

‘Dejection: An Ode’   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
72 words

...An Ode’ An autobiographical poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge , first published in the Morning Post , 1802 . It describes the loss of his poetical powers, the dulling of his responses to Nature, the breakdown of his marriage, and the paralysing effect of metaphysics (or opium). Paradoxically, this is achieved in verse of great emotional intensity and metrical brilliance. Wordsworth partly answered it in his ‘Intimations of Immortality’ ode...

‘Dejection: An Ode’

‘Dejection: An Ode’   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
86 words

...An Ode’ An autobiographical poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge , first published in the Morning Post , 1802 . Originally composed as a much longer verse letter to his beloved ‘Asra’ (Sara Hutchinson), it describes the loss of his poetical powers, the dulling of his responses to Nature, the breakdown of his marriage, and the paralysing effect of metaphysics (or opium). Paradoxically, this is achieved in verse of great emotional intensity and metrical brilliance. Wordsworth partly answered it in his ‘Intimations of Immortality’ ode...

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