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nonmaleficence

The ethical principle of doing no harm, expressed in the ancient medical maxim primum non nocere (first do no harm). Its approximate counterpart in population health is the precautionary ...

nonmaleficence

nonmaleficence ((in ethics))   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Nursing (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
15 words

... [non-mal- ef -i-sĕns] n. ( in ethics ) the duty to avoid causing harm to...

nonmaleficence

nonmaleficence   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...nonmaleficence The ethical principle of doing no harm, expressed in the ancient medical maxim primum non nocere (first do no harm). Its approximate counterpart in population health is the precautionary principle . ...

nonmaleficence

nonmaleficence n.   Quick reference

Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
91 words

... n. one of the four principles and common to many theories of medical ethics: doctors should avoid causing harm to patients ( see primum non nocere ). As almost all medical interventions carry some risk of harm, however small, in practice a doctor should avoid risking unnecessary harm or any harm that is disproportionate to the benefit intended. Consequently, risks should be minimized and considered along with the intended benefits when evaluating specific interventions. Harm can include psychological, emotional, or social harm as well as...

NonMaleficence

NonMaleficence   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Epidemiology (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...NonMaleficence The ethical principle of causing no harm. 59 , 73 , 74 , 75 , 76 , 77 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 259 , 260 , 263 , 264 , 265 See also precautionary principle . ...

non-maleficence

non-maleficence   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...non-maleficence The ethical principle that health care professionals should do no harm. This is potentially challenging in health care when some procedures may be harmful in the short term, or have significant risk attached, and yet the long-term/potential benefits are positive. See also ethics...

nonmaleficence

nonmaleficence  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The ethical principle of doing no harm, expressed in the ancient medical maxim primum non nocere (first do no harm). Its approximate counterpart in population health is the precautionary principle.
primum non nocere

primum non nocere  

Reference type:
Overview Page
An ancient dictum of medical ethics, usually translated from the Latin as “first do no harm”. This statement of the principle of nonmaleficence is often mistakenly believed to form part of the ...
four principles

four principles  

Reference type:
Overview Page
An approach to medical ethics, proposed by Tom Beauchamp and James F. Childress, that identifies four basic tenets of ethical practice, namely: autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice. ...
beneficence

beneficence  

(bi-nef-i-sĕns)(in health care) the duty to do good and avoid doing harm to other people, which includes acting to promote their interests and protecting the weak and vulnerable. It includes the duty ...
risk–benefit analysis

risk–benefit analysis  

Strictly speaking, an economic analysis in which the direct and indirect costs of an action or intervention are set out in a balance sheet with the economic benefits in the opposing columns, but in ...
exploitation

exploitation  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
Originally the term has no moral connotations, referring simply to the use or development of resources. In moral and political philosophy it now applies specifically to the unjust economic and social ...
consequentialism

consequentialism  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
(kon-si-kwen-shăl-izm)an ethical approach that stresses the importance of taking account of the objective effects or consequences of one's actions on other people and on the overall situation. ...
four principles

four principles   Quick reference

Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
65 words

...principles an approach to medical ethics, proposed by Tom Beauchamp and James F. Childress, that identifies four basic tenets of ethical practice, namely: respect for autonomy , beneficence , nonmaleficence , and justice . Although the four principles are often used as a framework for decision-making in Western medical ethics, there may be problems when principles conflict or their application is contested in...

primum non nocere

primum non nocere   Quick reference

Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
59 words

...non nocere Latin for ‘first do no harm’, a traditional medical aphorism, similar to the Greek for ‘abstain from doing harm’ in the Hippocratic Oath and also to the prima facie principle of nonmaleficence . It is a reminder to first consider whether a proposed medical intervention risks causing more harm than good. See also risk–benefit analysis...

risk–benefit analysis

risk–benefit analysis   Quick reference

Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
54 words

...analysis an analytical process used to weigh up the probability of foreseeable risks and benefits of an action or policy. In medical ethics, it provides a means of reconciling the principles of beneficence and nonmaleficence where a particular intervention has dangers as well as benefits. Compare cost–benefit analysis . See also consequentialism...

precautionary principle

precautionary principle   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...“better safe than sorry” approach that wisdom dictates should be the rule when there is any doubt about long-term consequences of irreversible decisions affecting control of the environment or a situation. It is a variation on the theme of the ethical principle of nonmaleficence, primum non nocere , or first do no harm. ...

Precautionary Principle

Precautionary Principle   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Epidemiology (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...a relevant risk exists, prudence and ethical norms warrant that action be taken to reduce or eliminate the risk, even if the evidence is not conclusive. 13 , 267 Similar in some ways the medical maxim primum non nocere (“first do no harm”) and the ethical principle of Nonmaleficence . 17 , 59 , 73 , 74 , 75 , 76 , 77 , 116 , 213 , 360 See also costs of inaction . ...

beneficence

beneficence n.   Quick reference

Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
90 words

...ethics. The obligation to act in patients’ best interests at all times is recognized in ancient and modern codes of professional conduct, e.g. the Hippocratic oath . Benefits in health care, and therefore beneficence, must commonly be balanced against risks or harms (i.e. nonmaleficence ). The courts have been clear that beneficence extends beyond medical interests. Respect for autonomy requires that professionals determine what the patient considers to be doing good in any given...

ethics

ethics   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... bce ). Some of Aristotle's virtues, including truthfulness, integrity, compassion, are the basis for one approach to applications of ethics in the health sector. Other approaches include principle-based ethics, based on the four principles respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and equity or justice; and duty-based ethics or deontology, which means behaving according to tenets defined by beliefs, usually in a particular religious faith. See also bioethics ; virtue-based ethics . ...

exploitation

exploitation n.   Quick reference

Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
104 words

... n. taking unfair advantage of another’s misfortune, weakness, or vulnerability . In medical ethics, the principle of nonmaleficence means that doctors have an active duty to avoid any exploitation of their patients. This is usually held to require that professional boundaries are maintained and to prohibit personal or sexual relationships between professionals and their patients. Another example of potential exploitation is the practice of holding clinical trials and conducting research in developing countries when the treatments being tested...

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