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neo-Malthusian

A pessimist view of the relationship between population, economic growth, and resources, based on the ideas of Thomas Malthus, who argued that population growth and economic growth would ...

neo‐Malthusian

neo‐Malthusian   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...‐Malthusian A pessimist view of the relationship between population , economic growth , and resources , based on the ideas of Thomas Malthus , who argued that population growth and economic growth would eventually be checked by absolute limits on resources such as food, energy, or water. This viewpoint grew in popularity particularly between the 1940s and the 1960s, when population growth and economic development were particularly strong in many countries. Many experts concluded that rapid population growth would eventually be checked by some absolute...

Malthusian and Neo-Malthusian Theories

Malthusian and Neo-Malthusian Theories   Reference library

Ran Abramitzky and Fabio Braggion

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Economic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics
Length:
3,367 words

...were negatively related to income. Regarding the Malthusian comparison between demographic trends in France and England, Weir estimated the elasticity of the response of birthrates and death rates to wheat price shocks in France and Britain for the period 1670–1869 . If the neo-Malthusian prediction is correct, a higher response of birthrates to wheat price shocks in Britain and a higher reaction of mortality rates in France are expected as positive enters in action. Weir's results reject the Malthusian prediction in most cases. During the second half of...

neo-Malthusian

neo-Malthusian  

A pessimist view of the relationship between population, economic growth, and resources, based on the ideas of Thomas Malthus, who argued that population growth and economic growth would eventually ...
Malthusian and Neo-Malthusian Theories

Malthusian and Neo-Malthusian Theories  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Few economists have had such controversial ideas and generated a debate on such a scale as Thomas Malthus. In An Essay on the Principle of Population, published in 1798, the ...
neo-Malthusianism

neo-Malthusianism noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
41 words
neo-Malthusianism

neo-Malthusianism noun   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
45 words
neo-Malthusianism

neo-Malthusianism noun   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
26 words
Political Economy

Political Economy   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,138 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...that formed during the first decades of the nineteenth century advocated birth control within marriage. Neither Malthus nor any of the other *Anglican clerics who increasingly sought to combine their interest in political economy with natural theology could accept this neo-Malthusian remedy. Increase and multiply regardless of individual and social consequences was clearly a misreading of God's message, but the idea that God had designed a universe in which the struggle to overcome necessity was essential to optimal cultivation of the earth and man's...

Malthusianism

Malthusianism  

In 1798, ThomasRobert Malthus (1766–1834) published his Essay on Population in which he put forward the theory that the power of a population to increase is greater than that of the Earth to provide ...
Ultimate Resource

Ultimate Resource  

A controversial book by Julian Simon (1996) that attacks neo‐Malthusian thinking and supports continued population and economic growth, arguing that there are few physical limits to the availability ...
Limits to Growth

Limits to Growth  

A report written on behalf of the Club of Rome by Dennis and Donella Meadows in 1971. Using dynamic computer models of various possible future scenarios for world growth it predicted that serious ...
Malthusianism

Malthusianism   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...(1997) refers to the ‘great escape’ from the Malthusian trap by large chunks of humanity. Malthusian theory is deployed to underpin the theory of European historical superiority by arguing that Europeans, uniquely, have generally (and rationally) avoided the Malthusian disasters of overpopulation while non-Europeans (irrationally) have not done so and therefore not developed as Europe has. ‘While old-style Malthusians simply saw an inevitable tendency of human population to outgrow food production, neo-Malthusian scholars offered a more complicated, political...

Political Economy of Soil Erosion in Developing Countries, The

Political Economy of Soil Erosion in Developing Countries, The   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
68 words

...in Developing Countries, The One of the foundational studies in what was to be later termed political ecology . Based in part on his field research in Nepal, its author Piers Blaikie (1985) argued that soil erosion was not caused by mismanagement or overpopulation as neo-Malthusian theories would believe, but by the position of peasant farmers in a wider political...

Malthusianism

Malthusianism   Reference library

The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
833 words

...industrialized nations as evidence that such regulatory systems exist among humans. However, in the West, Malthusian Darwinism has remained dominant and can be traced through ecologists such as Ernst Haeckel ( 1834–1919 ) to the eugenicist policies of twentieth-century America and Germany. India's sterilization projects in the 1970s and China's single-child policy can likewise be linked to governments acting under Malthusian preconceptions. Neo-Malthusian warnings that populations were outstripping food supplies resurfaced in the 1940s and 60s, as represented...

Malthusianism

Malthusianism   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
335 words

...ideas of human perfectibility arising from the French Revolution and the Enlightenment . Hence they have been characterized as pessimistic. Malthus’s ideas were debated and contested at the time, but a revived Malthusianism took shape from the 1950s onwards in response to the rapidly growing world population. Often termed ‘neo-Malthusianism’, such views stressed the necessity for robust population planning and fertility control in order to avert looming disaster. Malthus himself had scorned the use of contraception. These arguments crystallized around...

carrying capacity

carrying capacity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
103 words

...been applied to a planetary scale. The Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) suggests that humanity would need three Earths to sustain the whole world’s population at current Western levels of resource consumption. The carrying capacity idea has been criticized because of its neo-*Malthusian overtones and reliance on the idea that nature places fixed limits on economic...

limits to growth

limits to growth   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
206 words

...to growth A perspective on human population and resources use that advises radical steps to avoid catastrophic consequences. Although it shares much in common with long-standing Malthusian and neo-Malthusian positions, the argument crystallized around a report by the Club of Rome published in 1972 . The Limits to Growth was authored by US environmental scientist Donella H. Meadows and three colleagues. Its innovation was to mathematically model variables at the world scale and explore feedback mechanisms among them. In addition to population and...

overpopulation

overpopulation   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...each of which is nested as a subsystem interlinked with other territorial, economic, cultural and social systems’ ( Faus-Pujol and Higueras-Arnal (2000) Applied Geog. 20, 3 ). Perhaps the foremost diagnoses of overpopulation come from P. Ehrlich (with A. Ehrlich 1990). Neo-Malthusians support the argument; see Lempert (1987) E. Afr. Econ. Rev. 3, 1 . Marxists, however, view overpopulation as the result of the maldistribution and underdevelopment of resources (Marx, Capital , vol. iii; see also Y. S. Brenner 1969). In the developed world, some would...

deforestation

deforestation   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
458 words

...land for subsistence or commercial agriculture, followed by commercial logging and for fuel wood; sometimes these occur together. What lies behind these causes is debated. Deforestation has become a key issue for the different explanations of human resource use, from neo- Malthusianism to political economy . Among the root causes advanced are population pressure, the absence of private property arrangements ( see tragedy of the commons ), political corruption and the power of landed classes, ruling elites and military allies, and market failure. ...

Demography

Demography   Reference library

Daniel Scott Smith

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Social History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...movement—that is, fertility, mortality, and migration. Historically, American demography fits into a three-stage progression characteristic of societies that now have low birth- and death rates. Convenient labels for these three stages are “Malthusian-frontier,” “neo-Malthusian,” and “post-Malthusian.” (The term “Malthusian” comes from the name Thomas Robert Malthus, a pioneering English theorist of demography.) Originating in the theory of demographic transition, this periodization scheme locates, between two periods of relative stability, a turbulent...

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