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Overview

navigation

Subject: History

N. 1 the process or activity of accurately ascertaining one's position and planning and following a route. 2 the passage of ships. ...

navigation

navigation n.   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... n. 1 the process or activity of accurately ascertaining one's position and planning and following a route. 2 the passage of ships. navigational ...

navigation

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A Dictionary of Marketing (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences, Business and Management
Length:
26 words

... The facilitation of movement from one web page to another, or from one type of online content to another. See also broad and shallow navigation...

navigation

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
78 words

... Determining one's position and course, often while in a road vehicle, ship, or aircraft. Five main techniques are used: dead reckoning, piloting, celestial navigation, inertial guidance, and radio navigation. The last includes the use of radio beacons, loran , radar navigation, and satellite navigation systems. Instruments and charts enable the navigator to determine position, expressed in terms of latitude and longitude , direction in degrees of arc from true north, speed, and distance travelled. See also compass ; gyrocompass ; ...

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A Dictionary of Law (9 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
34 words

...navigation n. 1. The science of directing the course of a vessel or aircraft. Loss occasioned by improper navigation may arise even though a vessel is moored. 2. A right to navigate inland waters....

navigation

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A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... The science of planning/plotting and following a course of travel, particularly used for directing ships and...

navigation

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A Dictionary of Space Exploration (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...navigation The science and technology of finding the position, course, and distance travelled by a ship, plane, or other craft. Satellite navigation uses satellites that broadcast time and position signals. The US global positioning system ( GPS ) was introduced in 1992 , featuring 24 Navstar satellites. The same year, 85 nations agreed to take part in trials of a new navigation system known as FANS, or Future Navigation System, using 24 Russian Glonass satellites and the 24 US GPS...

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A Dictionary of Zoology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
28 words

... The orientation of itself by an animal towards a destination, regardless of its direction, by means other than the recognition of landmarks. Compare compass orientation ; pilotage ....

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A Dictionary of Business and Management (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences, Business and Management
Length:
35 words

... On the Internet, the process of finding and moving between different information and pages on a website. It is governed by menu arrangements, site structure, the layout of individual pages, and, sometimes, searching...

navigation

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A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
79 words

... The practice of travelling from one place to another following a prescribed route. Such navigation requires the accurate monitoring of position and direction. It is a key maritime and aerial skill for sailing or flying efficiently across oceans and continents, in order to arrive safely at a destination. Prior to the development of modern technologies such as GPS , navigators would use techniques such as dead reckoning, taking celestial measurements, or identifying key landmarks to plot their...

navigation

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A Dictionary of Biology (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
174 words

...navigation The complex process that enables animals to travel along a particular course in order to reach a specific destination. Navigation is an important aspect of behaviour in many animals, particularly those, such as birds, fish, and some insects, that undergo migrations . Landmarks, such as coastlines and mountain ranges, are important reference points for navigation but many animals can navigate successfully without the aid of these, by using the sun, stars, magnetic fields, odours, and polarized light. For example, birds use the sun and stars as...

navigation

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Mike Richey

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
3,068 words
Illustration(s):
2

... , from the latin navis (a ship) and agere (to drive), the art and science of conducting a craft as it moves about its ways. See celestial navigation ; coastal navigation ; hyperbolic navigation ; inertial navigation ; satellite navigation . What follows is a short history of navigation. Navigation Without Artefacts. When James Cook discovered Oceania in the 18th century the cultures were still at a Neolithic stage of development. But to Captain Cook, perhaps the most illustrious of all scientific navigators , it was a matter of wonder the...

navigation

navigation   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the History of Modern Science

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Science and technology, History of Science
Length:
804 words

...development of a satellite-based positioning system with navigation radio beacons transmitting from orbits in space. The Global Positioning System (GPS), under construction since the 1970s, came on line with twenty-four satellites in 1995 . Eva G. R. Taylor , The Haven-Finding Art: A History of Navigation from Odysseus to Captain Cook (1956). Charles H. Cotter , A History of Nautical Astronomy (1968). W. E. May , A History of Marine Navigation (1973). Jean Randier , Marine Navigation Instruments (1977). Jim...

navigation

navigation   Reference library

Philip de Souza

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
490 words

... can be defined as the art of taking a ship successfully from one chosen point to another. From a very early stage the relatively calm, tideless waters of the Mediterranean encouraged travel by sea. Seagoing ships were not normally used in the winter months, because storms and poor visibility made navigation hazardous, but Hesiod ’s suggestion that sailing be limited to July and August is overcautious (Hes. Op . 663–5 ), the period between the vernal and autumnal equinoxes being the best season, with some leeway at either end. Ancient vessels were...

navigation

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The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
420 words

... is the art of guiding a ship at sea. The relatively calm, tideless waters of the Mediterranean encouraged travel by sea. Seagoing ships were not normally used in the winter months, because storms and poor visibility made navigation hazardous, but Hesiod 's suggestion that sailing be limited to July and August is overcautious, the period between the vernal and autumnal equinoxes being the best season, with some leeway at either end. Ancient vessels were either paddled, rowed, or sailed. Their speed depended upon size, type of propulsion, and the...

navigation

navigation   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
684 words

...with the calendar were irrelevant because the measurements were not very exact. Contemporary literature is much concerned with improved instruments for navigation, such as the cross-staff , long used by astronomers but introduced onto ships in the early fifteenth century, or the backstaff ; the uses of new instruments, usually ones obtainable from the author, are found in many treatises on navigation, for instance one by the well-known instrument-maker Michel Coignet ( 1549–1623 ), Onderwysinghe op de principaelste puncten der navigatien ( 1580 ). The...

Navigation

Navigation   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
343 words

... was restricted by climate and Byz. control of the sea; naval technology remained limited. Since the Byz. ship was usually small with a shallow keel, designed essentially for coastal cruising, the Byz. remained cautious mariners, “touching dry land with the oars” ( Theophylaktos of Ohrid, ed. Gautier , 2:139.28–29). Sailing speeds reached 6 to 8 knots. The introduction of the triangular lateen sail by the 7th C. provided easier handling in bad weather and greater flexibility in catching the wind, but steering by compass, developed in the 13th C.,...

navigation

navigation   Reference library

Philip de Souza

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
539 words

... can be defined as the art of taking a ship successfully from one chosen point to another. From a very early stage the relatively calm, tideless waters of the Mediterranean encouraged travel by sea. Seagoing ships were not normally used in the winter months, because storms and poor visibility made navigation hazardous, but Hesiod 's suggestion that sailing be limited to July and August is overcautious ( Hes. Op. 663–5), the period between the vernal and autumnal equinoxes being the best season, with some leeway at either end. Ancient vessels were...

navigation

navigation   Reference library

Aaron Beek

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... Ancient Mediterranean ships utilized a pair of side rudders (technically called quarter-rudders), while North Sea ships used a single side rudder. The stern rudder was not unknown, but generally appears to have been reserved for river craft. Both square sails (for sailing with the wind) and triangular lateen sails (for tacking against the wind) were in widespread use. Mediterranean sailors long navigated by the simple system of pilotage, not sailing out of sight of land and even pulling up on the shore every night. Warships had difficulty carrying...

navigation

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A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... The orientation of itself by an animal towards a destination, regardless of its direction, by means other than the recognition of landmarks. Compare compass orientation ; pilotage...

navigation

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A Dictionary of Animal Behaviour (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
644 words

...birds use the sun and stars as a compass, but a compass alone is not sufficient for bicoordinate navigation. Similarly, there is evidence for use of a magnetic compass by animals, but this alone is not sufficient for bicoordinate (i.e. map and compass) navigation. Despite much research, there is no convincing evidence for the use of a map analogue by animals. Navigation by non-bicoordinate methods is possible in theory, especially in the case of return navigation to a location previously experienced. Information gained on the outward journey can be used to...

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