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Muristus

Muristus   Reference library

James W. McKinnon

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
108 words

...Muristus . Inventor of organ-like instruments. His name appears, in various forms, only in medieval Arabic sources and he has been inconclusively identified with Ctesibius of Alexandria and with various Greek writers. Two devices were attributed to him. One had 12 pipes, their valves operated in an unspecified fashion and supplied with wind by the lung power of four men; the other was a primitive quasi-siren, with a hydraulic wind apparatus similar to that of the hydraulis and therefore looked upon by some as its forerunner. See J. Perrot : L’orgue de ses...

Archaeology of instruments

Archaeology of instruments   Reference library

Robert Anderson, Arturo Chamorro, Ellen Hickmann, Anne Kilmer, Gerhard Kubik, Thomas Turino, Vincent Megaw, and Alan R. Thrasher

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
8,311 words

... bce ) with the invention of the hydraulis and the Roman historian Ammianus Marcellinus confirms that it was played in the circus in the 3rd century ce . In the 8th and 9th centuries Arab scholars translated the writings of Classical antiquity, especially those of the Greeks. Muristus gives an account of the organ accompanied by a drawing showing its construction, but no archaeological evidence indicates whether it still existed. The depiction in the 9th-century Utrecht Psalter might not be organologically accurate. A good example of the way in which archaeology...

Organ

Organ   Reference library

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
67,540 words
Illustration(s):
11

...seen one. A famous source, the Epistle to (or from) Muristus, describes two organs, one of which is a kind of siren or signal-organ; the sources containing Muristus’s writings are also interesting in that two of them (in Beirut and in the British Library) show how a diagrammatic plan can become, under the scribe’s hand, an unintelligible pattern of abstract design. Nothing is known of Muristus, and the graphic similarity of his name in Arabic to Qatasibiyus (Ctesibius) was pointed out by Farmer; Muristus appears to have been a Greek (or Byzantine), and in...

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