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mudrā

Subject: Religion

Term denoting gesture in Hindu dancing. Béjart chose Mudra as the name for his school in Brussels.

mudra

mudra   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Dance (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
18 words

...mudra Term denoting gesture in Hindu dancing. Béjart chose Mudra as the name for his school in...

mudrā

mudrā   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
198 words
Illustration(s):
1

... (Skt. a seal) 1 A symbolic gesture of the hands or bodily posture communicating a specific meaning. From the earliest artistic representations onwards, Buddhas are always depicted with their hands in certain standard mudrās, the most important being the ‘wheel of the Dharma ’ ( dharma-cakra-mudrā ), the first finger and thumb of each hand forming a circle; the earth-touching mudrā ( bhūmi-sparśa-mudrā ), the right hand touching the earth calling it to witness the Buddha's enlightenment ( bodhi ); and the gesture of protection or fearlessness (...

Mudra

Mudra   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
148 words

... (Skt., ‘seal’, ‘sign’). In both Hinduism and Buddhism, a sign of power, through the body, especially the hands. In Hinduism, the mudras of ritual worship ( pūjā ) are an outward and visible sign of spiritual reality which they bring into being. Thus mudras frequently appear in Hindu sculpture (as they do in Jain and Buddhist), especially dhyāna (meditation, hands linked in front of body with palms upward), abhaya, cf. abhaya-vacana (fear-repelling, hand lifted, palm outward), and varada (hand held out, palm upward, bestowing bounty). The añjali ...

Mudrā

Mudrā  

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Music

... Sanskrit term for a sign or symbol. In music it is a term placed in a song indicating the name of its composer, patron, rāga, tāla, or type of composition. The term mudrā is commonly used in Karnatik music. A composer may use his name as it is or a pen-name. Instances of pen-names or pseudonym mudrās are Guruguha of Muthuswāmi Dīkshitar and Daras-piyā of Mehboob Khan of...

Mudrā

Mudrā   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
323 words

... . The hand gestures in Indian classical dance are commonly known as mudrā , although the term used by dancers is hasta . The gestures form part of the system of aṅgīkabhinaya (body movement used to convey meaning and expression). The Nāṭyaśāstra treatises treat the topic of hasta s in detail. They are classified in three categories: asamyuta (single), samyuta (double), and nṛtta (pure dance). Their number varies according to different texts: the Nāṭyaśāstra enumerates twenty-four single, thirteen double, and twenty-seven nṛtta hasta s; the ...

mudrā

mudrā (P.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...mudrā . ( P. muddā ; T. phyag rgya ; C. yin ; J. in ; K. in 印 ‎ ). In Sanskrit, lit., “seal,” “mark,” or “sign”; but in Buddhist contexts it often refers to hand and arm “gestures” made during the course of ritual practice or depicted in images of buddhas, bodhisattvas, tantric deities, and other Buddhist images. Mudrās commonly associated with figures of the Buddha, such as the “gesture of fearlessness” ( abhayamudrā ), the “earth-touching gesture” ( bhūmisparśamudrā ), the “wheel of the dharma gesture” ( dharmacakramudrā ), and the “gesture of...

mudrā(s)

mudrā(s)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Hinduism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
153 words

...(s) (‘ seal ’, ‘ signet ring ’, ‘ image ’, ‘ sign ’, ‘ mark ’) 1 Hand gestures, usually accompanied by mantras . Considered to be the deity, or aspects of the deity, in the form of physical movement, mudrās are part of the means by which a new, or purified body is created in Tantric ritual. Various extended meanings are also commonly employed in Tantric texts and practices. 2 A gesture which protects or ‘seals’ the body; a protective sign: the palm of the hand, or its imprint (synonymous with hasta—‘hand’). 3 Hand gestures used in...

Abhaya-mudra

Abhaya-mudra   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
20 words

...mudra (Skt., ‘fearlessness’ + mudra ). The gesture of being without fear (only acquired in full in the condition of mokṣa...

Jñāna-mudra

Jñāna-mudra   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
42 words

...mudra . The Hindu mudra (hand symbol) encapsulating knowledge: the index finger and thumb are joined, with the fingers outstretched; the finger ( jīva ) is united with the thumb ( ātman ), in the truth which points (outstretched fingers) beyond itself to what is...

varada-mudrā

varada-mudrā   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Hinduism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
36 words

...mudrā (‘ wish-giving gesture ’) A common iconographic mudrā , displayed as a hand with the palm turned towards the viewer and the fingers pointing down, indicating the deity's ability to give boons or grant the devotee's...

abhaya-mudrā

abhaya-mudrā   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Hinduism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
42 words

...mudrā (‘ gesture of fearlessness ’) In iconography a hand gesture ( mudrā ) in which the palm of a deity's or teacher's right hand is raised towards the devotee to inspire trust and dispel fear. Frequently represented on Hindu , Buddhist , and Jaina ...

abhaya-mudrā

abhaya-mudrā   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
102 words
Illustration(s):
1

...mudrā (Skt., gesture of fearlessness). Iconographic hand gesture ( mudrā ) whose purpose is to dispel fear and communicate protection, benevolence, and peace. Commonly found in representations of the Buddha and celestial Bodhisattvas, where the figure is usually depicted standing with the right arm bent, the palm raised and facing forwards, and the fingers joined. This gesture is rare among figures of lower status. There are many variations in which the left hand is also used, such as the double abhaya-mudrā found in south-east Asia, or in...

samaya-mudrā

samaya-mudrā   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
44 words

...mudrā (Skt.) Seal of Symbols; one of the four meditation seals ( mudrā ) according to yoga-tantra . It refers to the process of imaging the Buddhas in transformational meditation practice by way of symbolic emblems which correlate to their mind aspect ( see body, speech, mind...

dharma-mudrā

dharma-mudrā   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
47 words

...mudrā (Skt.). Seal of Dharma ; one of the four meditational seals ( mudrā ) according to the yoga-tantra . It refers to the process of imaging the Buddhas in transformational meditation practice by way of seed-syllables ( bīja ) which correlate to their speech aspect ( see body, speech and mind...

karma-mudrā

karma-mudrā   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
55 words

...mudrā (Skt.) 1 Action Seal; one of the four meditational seals ( mudrā ) according to the yoga-tantra . It refers to the process of imaging the Buddhas in transformational meditation practice by way of hand-gestures and so forth, which correlate to their ‘action’ aspect. See anuttara-yoga-tantra . 2 In anuttara-yoga-tantra , a female partner used in sexual...

khecarī mudrā

khecarī mudrā   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Hinduism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
31 words

...mudrā A haṭha-yogic practice, involving the bending of the tongue backwards into the space above the throat, in order to retain, through drinking, the accumulated nectar of immortality ( amṛta...

Vajroli mudra

Vajroli mudra   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
40 words

...mudra (Skt.). A Tantric practice of reabsorbing, into the penis, semen discharged during intercourse. Semen ( bindu ), breath ( prāṇa ), and thought ( citta ) correspond in Tantrism , and through reabsorbing the semen, the Tantric adept seeks to arrest breath and...

añjali(mudrā)

añjali(mudrā)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Hinduism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
64 words

...mudrā) (‘ gesture of honouring /salutation ’) The typical gesture of the devotee before an image of a god, or a living guru , and the gesture of respectful greeting in general. It involves placing the hands together, palms slightly hollowed, and holding them in front of one's chest. They may be raised to the forehead (a gesture known as añjalibandhana) as a mark of...

añjali[mudrā]

añjali[mudrā] (T.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...añjali[mudrā] . ( T. thal mo sbyar ba ; C. hezhang ; J. gasshō ; K. hapchang 合掌 ‎ ). In Sanskrit and Pāli, “gesture of supplication” or “gesture of greeting.” The añjali is a traditional Indian gesture of salutation and respect wherein the palms of the hands are pressed together with fingers pointing up, usually at the level of the heart or the forehead. As a specific type of gesture ( mudrā ), añjali is used to symbolize thusness ( tathatā ). In Buddhist iconography, this is one of the principal mudrās of Avalokiteśvara , who in several forms...

bhūmi-sparśa-mudrā

bhūmi-sparśa-mudrā   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
112 words
Illustration(s):
1

...mudrā (Skt., earth-touching gesture). A mudrā , or iconographic posture, in which the Buddha is depicted seated in the lotus posture (padmāsana) touching the earth with his right hand. Usually all the fingers are extended and the tips touch the earth while the left hand remains resting in the lap. This posture depicts the moment when the Buddha was seated under the Bodhi Tree at Bodhgayā on the night of his enlightenment. He called upon the earth to witness his right to sit upon that seat as a result of the practices of pāramī ( see ...

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