You are looking at 1-20 of 72 entries  for:

  • All: motion-induced blindness x
clear all

View:

Overview

motion-induced blindness

A tendency for a stationary or slowly moving stimulus to disappear from sight when viewed against a pattern of moving elements. In a standard demonstration of this phenomenon, three ...

motion-induced blindness

motion-induced blindness n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...-induced blindness n. A tendency for a stationary or slowly moving stimulus to disappear from sight when viewed against a pattern of moving elements. In a standard demonstration of this phenomenon, three stationary or slowly moving yellow dots are viewed against a background of rotating blue dots or other shapes, and the yellow dots tend to disappear, singly or together, for several seconds at a stretch. The phenomenon is a form of simultanagnosia and may be related to change blindness , inattentional blindness , the Cheshire Cat effect , and the ...

motion‐induced blindness

motion‐induced blindness   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Consciousness

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,858 words

...to experimental investigation, and may be used to study the neural correlates of consciousness. Yoram S. Bonneh Bach, M. (2002). ‘Motioninduced blindness.’ In 80 Optical Illusions and Visual Phenomena . http://www.michaelbach.de/ot/mot_mib/ Bonneh, Y. , Cooperman, A. , and Sagi, D. (2000) ‘Motion induced blindness’ . http://www.weizmann.ac.il/home/bnbobbeh/MIB/mib.html —— —— —— (2001). ‘ Motioninduced blindness in normal observers ’. Nature , 411. Crick, F. and Koch, C. (2003). ‘ A framework for consciousness ’. Nature Neuroscience , 6....

motion-induced blindness

motion-induced blindness  

A tendency for a stationary or slowly moving stimulus to disappear from sight when viewed against a pattern of moving elements. In a standard demonstration of this phenomenon, three stationary or ...
change blindness

change blindness  

Failure to notice a change in the visual field occurring during a saccade or when vision is otherwise interrupted. Compare inattentional blindness, motion-induced blindness.
inattentional blindness

inattentional blindness  

Failure to register consciously a visual stimulus when attention is focused elsewhere. The term was coined in the title of the book Inattentional Blindness (1998) by the US psychologists Arien Mack ...
simultanagnosia

simultanagnosia  

Impaired ability to perceive more than one object or image at the same time, hence an inability to comprehend a whole picture even when its constituent elements can be recognized, often occurring as ...
artificial scotoma

artificial scotoma  

A scotoma induced by a pattern of randomly twinkling visual spots against a grey background, such as is produced by a television receiver tuned to an open channel, against which a small uniform grey ...
after-effect, perceptual

after-effect, perceptual  

Exposure to a sensory stimulus can produce illusory perceptual experiences immediately following this exposure period. The period of initial stimulation is typically called the adaptation period and ...
multistable perception

multistable perception  

For some objects or events, perception can fluctuate over time, with alternative perceptual interpretations replacing one another even though the physical conditions of stimulation remain unchanged; ...
Plateau spiral

Plateau spiral  

An Archimedes spiral or some other spiral that is attached to a circular disc and, when rotating, appears to be continuously expanding from its centre or contracting towards its centre depending on ...
change blindness

change blindness n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...blindness n. Failure to notice a change in the visual field occurring during a saccade or when vision is otherwise interrupted. Compare inattentional blindness , motion-induced blindness...

simultanagnosia

simultanagnosia n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...more than one object or image at the same time, hence an inability to comprehend a whole picture even when its constituent elements can be recognized, often occurring as a symptom of Bálint’s syndrome or a lesion in the left temporal lobe. See also agnosia , motion-induced blindness , Navon figure . [From simultan ( eous ) + agnosia...

inattentional blindness

inattentional blindness n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...own name or a non-inverted happy face, was usually noticed. This phenomenon may help to explain why motorists and train drivers sometimes go through red traffic signals and why certain other accidents occur. See also visual search . Compare change blindness , motion-induced blindness...

motion perception

motion perception   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
2,604 words
Illustration(s):
9

...scan across the retina and stimulate receptors to fire in sequence. This sequential firing is converted into a motion signal by neural motion detectors, first described by Werner Reichardt ( 1957 , 1961 ). 1. Models of motion perception 2. First- versus second-order motion 3. The correspondence problem 4. Biological motion 5. Physiology of motion perception 6. Motion blindness 1. Models of motion perception Reichardt's motion model for insect vision was applied to human vision by van Santen and George Sperling and others. If a spot moves...

change blindness

change blindness   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Consciousness

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,974 words

...detect changes to attended objects in motion pictures ’. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review , 4. ——, Momen, N. , Drivdahl, S. B. , and Simons, D. J. (2000). ‘ Change blindness blindness: the metacognitive error of overestimating change‐detection ability ’. Visual Cognition , 7. Mitroff, S. R. , Simons, D. J. , and Levin, D. T. (2004). ‘ Nothing compares 2 views: change blindness results from failures to compare retained information ’. Perception and Psychophysics , 66. Noë, A. (2005). ‘ What does change blindness teach us about consciousness? ’ Trends...

artificial scotoma

artificial scotoma n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...US psychologist and neuroscientist Vilayanur S. Ramachandran (born 1951 ) and the English psychologist Richard L(angton) Gregory ( 1923–2010 ) and reported in a letter to the journal Nature in 1991 . See also filling-in illusion , modal completion , motion-induced blindness , Troxler effect . [From English artificial + Greek skotoma dizziness, from skotos darkness + -oma indicating an...

Plateau spiral

Plateau spiral n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...spiral or some other spiral that is attached to a circular disc and, when rotating, appears to be continuously expanding from its centre or contracting towards its centre depending on the direction of rotation. After being observed for several seconds it induces a powerful opposite motion aftereffect in which an object or surface that is fixated appears to be contracting or expanding, so that a person's face (for example) appears to shrink or enlarge while remaining paradoxically the same size, and this aftereffect is called the spiral aftereffect...

blindsight

blindsight   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Consciousness

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
3,054 words
Illustration(s):
2

...fall on to the receptor‐free optic disc (the natural blind spot), visual functions continued to be demonstrated in the cortically blind field. In addition to saccadic and manual localization of blind‐field targets, they include detection and discrimination of stimuli differing in flux, contour, orientation, motion, spatial frequency, shape, and wavelength (for review see Weiskrantz 1996 , Stoerig and Cowey 1997 ). Humans and monkeys thus show largely similar visual functions in their cortically blind fields. Together with the similar functional...

after‐effects, perceptual

after‐effects, perceptual   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Consciousness

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,772 words
Illustration(s):
2

...stronger following longer periods of adaptation. Thus, for example, 60 s of adaptation to visual motion produces a more vivid, long‐lasting motion after‐effect than does 30 s of adaptation. Now suppose one adapts to motion for 60 s, but during that adaptation period one is unaware of the motion for a substantial portion of the time. (Awareness of an adapting stimulus can be abolished by any of several means, including *binocular rivalry , *motioninduced blindness , or visual crowding—see Kim and Blake 2005 .) Now, following adaptation without continuous...

transcranial magnetic stimulation

transcranial magnetic stimulation   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Consciousness

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,565 words
Illustration(s):
4

... Magnetically induced phosphenes in sighted, blind and blindsighted observers . NeuroReport , 11. Keenan, J. P. , Wheeler, M. A. , Gallup Jr, G. G. , and Pascual‐Leone, A. (2001). Self recognition and the right prefrontal cortex . Trends in Cognitive Sciences , 4. Pascual‐Leone, A. and Walsh, V. (2001). Fast backprojections from the motion area to the primary visual area necessary for visual awareness . Science , 292. Silvanto, J. , Cowey, A. , Lavie, N. , and Walsh, V. (2005). Striate cortex (V1) activity gates awareness of motion . Nature...

View: